Words And Swords: First Look At Game Of Thrones Ep. 2

Hoo boy. This is going to be tricky.

What we’ve got for you here is a first look trailer for episode two of Telltale’s Game of Thrones series. That’s fine in and of itself. You could give it a watch: it’s quite entertaining.

The problem is in saying anything about it. After all, the unofficial motto of Game of Thrones appears to be “spoiler warning!”

This is particularly an issue given that Telltale’s contributions to the world of A Song of Ice and Fire are set alongside the events of season four of the television series, so anyone not up to date on that isn’t going to be happy if I mention anything I shouldn’t.

Then there’s the fact that lots of you probably haven’t yet played episode one of this series, so I don’t want to go and spoil anything there either. Although the trailer itself might do that. Hmm.

What I can say about this trailer is that it includes three fights, two scenes involving torture or punishment, five weighty conversations and one flipped table. As to the context of these incidents: that, my friends, you will have to learn for yourselves.

Episode two is expected to arrive in early February, including with the £23 season pass.

22 Comments

  1. seroto9 says:

    If there’s no boobs or flappy weiners I’m not watching it.

  2. Monggerel says:

    So, Game of Thrones.

    I really don’t get the appeal. I get the big interlocking narrative with tons of characters, I get the drama of the characters, even the most narratively important ones, being under constant threat of death, I get the cool lines and the political facekarate going on, and I think I get the uncompromising commitment to presenting violence, conflict and general purpose human brutality in a full-spectrum approach. I see all that.

    I just can’t seem to find any interest in it. The medievo-fantasy universe doesn’t help, but I’d hardly qualify it as the root cause. I understand “enjoyment” might not necessarily be the right term (that’s why I went with “interest”) – you don’t read Uber to enjoy a comic book, either. Still. I follow the one and not the other and I’m sort of confused about it all because I see at least a bit of superficial similarity.

    (A similarity which I might be mistaken about. Also Game of Throones appears a tad indulgent to me, whereas Uber is obviously disgusted with itself and seethes with contempt for its own universe, a sentiment echoed by most of its characters. Hm. Maybe I’m just broken in the head.)

    • Nuno Miguel says:

      Your first paragraph (well, technically second) says you get the appeal, it’s just that sometimes understanding something does not equate to liking it.

      And you know what? That’s perfectly fine. But if you get the appeal of intrigue and cynicism/pragmatism, perhaps you could try House of Cards. It’s GoT minus the medievalesque environment and over the top blood fest.

      • Monggerel says:

        Is that the one where Kevin Spacey has a torrid secret relationship with the camera?
        Mmmnotsure if that’s my cup of tea. Thanks for the suggestion though.

        • dysomniak says:

          They’re called soliloquies. But hey, what did that hack Shakespeare know about drama?

          • Monggerel says:

            You’re right, Shakespeare IS a hack.

            That said, it’s not the asides part that I mind. That’s a classic thing to do and I like it very much when I feel it’s performed well (e.g. two pivotal scenes in STALKER are longform soliloquys adressed directly to the camera, and they’re incredible). It’s the entire rest of the show I found particularly uninteresting.

      • dethtoll says:

        Minus the weiners and rape, too, I presume? That’s been my sticking point with GoT.

        • Nuno Miguel says:

          There is sex/sexual innuendo, but it’s not graphic, like in GoT.

          • dethtoll says:

            So no weiners and rape, then?

            (Basically I’m saying GRRM is a fucking creep)

          • Distec says:

            While I respect the decision not to watch or read GoT due to the inclusion of that content, I do wonder how you reach the conclusion in your last statement.

    • aldo_14 says:

      I really don’t get the appeal. I get the big interlocking narrative with tons of characters, I get the drama of the characters, even the most narratively important ones, being under constant threat of death, I get the cool lines and the political facekarate going on, and I think I get the uncompromising commitment to presenting violence, conflict and general purpose human brutality in a full-spectrum approach. I see all that.

      I just can’t seem to find any interest in it. The medievo-fantasy universe doesn’t help, but I’d hardly qualify it as the root cause. I understand “enjoyment” might not necessarily be the right term (that’s why I went with “interest”) – you don’t read Uber to enjoy a comic book, either. Still. I follow the one and not the other and I’m sort of confused about it all because I see at least a bit of superficial similarity.

      I think eventually it boils down to whatever little bit of your brain decides ‘I like that’ in these cases. Sometimes there’s not a specific reason (or, rather, I can’t think of any specific determinant).

    • lylebot says:

      That’s OK! I feel the same way about Mad Men, a show that I am apparently the only person in the world to not really enjoy.

      • stele says:

        I’m white, and couldn’t get into The Wire, so I get what you’re saying.

      • RuySan says:

        I love Mad Men, and it’s not as if everyone adores it, because i feel that most people don’t even know it exists.

        It’s a shame, it’s brilliant.

    • Werthead says:

      GAME OF THRONES is fundamentally about power, what people will do to achieve it, why they want it and the consequences of them exercising it. It’s about people screwing up with the best of intentions, and the worst people sometimes being necessary for stability. It’s about politics and religion and the responsible use (and irresponsible misuse) of military power. It’s about trying to bring about progressive social change in a society totally unprepared for it and held back by ultra-conservative forces. The reason for the success of the books and the TV show is the universality of the themes which go beyond simply being a fantasy story, whilst also having those elements that people like, such as dragons, swordfights and stuff blowing up.

      Admittedly the TV show does lowball some of this in favour of boobs and gore, but the core appeal of the thing is that it’s a story about humanity and all of its flaws.

  3. Asdfreak says:

    The thing holding me back from these games is that I am always afraid that they are not going to be as good as the books. Which is not hard, because the books differ greatly from other fantasy, in that you DON’T know whats going to happen. I’m just afraid that I start playing and think “Meh, that was predictable” and that’s the point at which I will stop playing and resent having bought the games.
    I’m just not trusting the game creators to deliver a story worthy of a GRRM universe, so that it might destroy a bit of the fun I had with the universe. That’s the reason I stopped watching the show. It started great, but degraded more and more, and when a certain Jean d’Arc impersonater met a certain little girl in the show that she never met or even got close to in the books, I stopped for good.

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      Thirith says:

      There’s a bit of a contradiction in that, though. You mind things being predictable, yet you balk at the series changing things from the books, which should make it less predictable for someone who knows the novels.

    • Werthead says:

      Actually, both Telltale and even Cyanide have done good jobs of making the games similar to the books whilst having their own unpredictable, GRRM-ish plot twists (although the Cyanide RPG makes you wait quite a long time before you get to those scenes). We don’t know how the Telltale series will turn out, of course, but Episode 1 did a great job of hitting those marks of unpredictability without being derivative of the books or TV show.

  4. Ham Solo says:

    As good as the first one was, they should really stop lying about the “your choices matter” bullshit.

  5. Shadowcat says:

    “Episode 2” of royal musical chairs?