Latest Terraria Update Brings Mac And Linux Support

The amazing work of CraTeR, who you can find more stuff from on the media page of the Terraria site.

Mac and Linux support for indie games is sort of like the rolling spaceship from Prometheus. Everyone thinks you can just get it out of the way but it’s a little more difficult than that when you’re actually in the hotseat. Terraria [official site] first launched in 2011 as an adorable and fun 2D alternative to big boy creative juggernaut Minecraft. Since then it’s had numerous spin-offs and a sequel announced, plus three huge updates that make it almost unrecognisable from that initial product. But this week, finally, OSX and Linux players have access to the game.

Owning it on Steam will be enough to get you the correct versions. The announcement post also has links to where you can grab dedicated server tools for the newly supported operating systems. This is the area where it’s actually quite an important development, as the vast majority of always-on servers scattered across the world do not run Windows. Linux is the stable OS of choice for these machines and now they can host Terraria servers to their owner’s heart’s content. There’s also a few known issues and workarounds in that thread and details on exactly which Linux distro is supported.

This news is actually quite useful to me, as Terraria is exactly the sort of game that will run on my old Macbook and that I want to play in quick bursts while out of the house. Presumably, a SteamOS version is also on the way. If you’re considering revisiting the game, why not join our young but very lovely Terraria RPS community server?

Meanwhile, alternate universe spin-off Terraria: Otherworld [official site] is currently in development, focused on fighting back against an already corrupted world rather than Terraria’s more serene beginnings. Terraria 2, it’s said, will come afterwards.

9 Comments

Top comments

  1. rustybroomhandle says:

    "Presumably, a SteamOS version is also on the way."

    SteamOS is Linux with some gaming-specific optimisations and Steam Big Picture mode as the desktop environment. You will also notice that on the Steam Store, the Linux icon is no longer the little penguin, but the SteamOS icon.
  1. rustybroomhandle says:

    “Presumably, a SteamOS version is also on the way.”

    SteamOS is Linux with some gaming-specific optimisations and Steam Big Picture mode as the desktop environment. You will also notice that on the Steam Store, the Linux icon is no longer the little penguin, but the SteamOS icon.

    • Ben Barrett says:

      Oh. I thought because it specifically mentioned Ubuntu but not SteamOS in the announcement post, it wasn’t compatible.

      • SomeDuder says:

        It’s all Linux, so if it works on 1 distribution, it will work on any (with the massive caveat that not all distributions are equally friendly to videogames, hence the massive push for a dedicated distribution that lets you play games, aka SteamOS)

        • rmsgrey says:

          Weeeeeeell, a game that works on Linux should work on any flavour or version of Linux but, you know how some games just don’t work on some PCs because of driver issues, or the wrong anti-virus, or whatever? Linux makes Windows PCs look like consoles for having predictable specs.

          Okay, sure, when you install software on Linux, you generally use a package manager that installs all known dependencies – so to a first approximation, it should still just work – but then you get a dependency that clashes with something already on your machine, or an obscure dependency that isn’t available from your local repository…

          Under a lot of circumstances, sure, a Linux version will “just work” on your personal Linux install, but not always.

          • rustybroomhandle says:

            It’s not so bad, as long as you follow these basic rules:

            1. Use NVIDIA hardware (seriously AMD, get your shit together)
            2. Use the official NVIDIA drivers
            3. Preferably use a 64 bit distro. Games like XCOM and Shadow of Mordor need it.

            Steam uses its own isolated distribution of libraries on Linux called the Steam Runtime, the idea being that there’s as little as possible outside dependencies.

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    distantlurker says:

    I see that dragon had the fish.

  3. Skeletor68 says:

    Great news! I can finally do some multiplayer with the girlfriend.

  4. hungrycookpot says:

    No but seriously, why didn’t they just run SIDEWAYS when the ship was rolling onto them?

    • Spakkenkhrist says:

      That film deserves the all the criticism heaped upon it, however I could understand people not thinking straight when a massive object is falling towards them.