Crytek’s Dinosaur Island VR Demo Now Dinoloadable

After some foolish experiments in the ’90s left dozens of people dead, scientists have mostly stopped trying to resurrect dinosaurs. It’s fine, don’t worry, now dinofans are only resurrecting them electron-sized within the secure confines of computers. Look at Crytek and their Back to Dinosaur Island, a tech demo with a dino nest safely inside y- wait, what? You have to put on virtual reality goggles and get shrunk down and travel inside your PC to confront the dinosaurs? Reader dear, do not do this – it is not safe.

Crytek today released the tech demo for all to nab through Steam, eight months after first showing it. Do not download it and enter with your cybergoggles. It cannot be safe.

This is perhaps offered in comisseration after Crytek announced that the full game this tech demo inspired, Robinson: The Journey, will not be coming to PC. I’m glad I’ve now got to re-use the post intro I’d originally written for that. Efficient use of #content here.

You’ll need Oculus Rift DK2 cybergoggles or newer to poke your head inside Back to Dinosaur Island, mind, as well as a respectable PC to keep the framerate flowly freely. Jittery VR is not a pleasant experience.

17 Comments

  1. WHS says:

    ugh THAT’S NOT WHAT DINOSAURS LOOKED LIKE

    • ninjapirate says:

      Once you know, there’s no turning back. Facts can be such a party pooper!

    • golem09 says:

      They sure did…
      in the 80s.

    • tnzk says:

      Honestly not a fan of this internet outrage “that’s not what dinos looked like” crap.

      Paleontologists change their opinions of what dinos looked like more so than they change their own underwear. Now before someone wants to rebut me with an article link from a freshly opened Chrome tab, take a deep breath and wait ten seconds, because in that time there will be another published opinion from a professional nobody who will tell us all what dinosaurs really looked like.

      TL;DR the nigh-moral outrage for dino depictions for entertainment purposes is silly. Could it be corrected? Yeah, and so could medieval dramas that depict the Middle Ages as backwards and superstitious. But no one cries foul about Game of Thrones because it’s just plain good to watch. I think. I don’t know, I’ve never seen it, because UGH THAT’S NOT WHAT THE MIDDLE AGES WERE LIKE.

      I dunno if I justified my point or voided it. Goodnight.

      • Holden McGroin says:

        Sir, thanks to you i finally made an RPS comment account.

        So i could tell you this;
        your TL:DR is as long as the section above it! hah haa! I comment on your comment. oh internet, how you truly keep us all busy busy busy little bees! :D

        Be well!

      • Premium User Badge

        particlese says:

        I think you made two different points, which makes the lengthy “tldr” pointed out by McGroin all the more amusing.

        Your first point seems to be that paleontologists are fickle creatures who might as well be ignored. I don’t know much about this supposed dinosaur physiology whingefest, so I could be wrong, buuuuuuut I reckon the dinosaur flavour of the month gets more accurate as the science and available evidence improves.

        Your TLDR point, on the other hand, seems to be “Who cares? 80s dinosaurs were awesome!” and I enthusiastically support this sentiment. You have also apparently not watched Game of Thrones, which is a crime punishable by high-five. I’ve also heard that it’s good, to be fair, but *Internet high-five* anyway.

        Good night.

      • rsf says:

        To the first point that models of the past are constantly being updated.

        Yes, that’s how science works. It’s an ongoing procedure where new data is used to make new, more refined, models. What science can tell you is not whether something is completely and exactly the same way as the previous model, but it can tell you absolutely that the previous model was wrong.

        It’s like someone saying the world was not flat a long time ago. If the ancient entertainment people had made a story about going around a cube world in 80 days, would that not be better than what we have now?

        > “the nigh-moral outrage for dino depictions for entertainment purposes is silly. Could it be corrected? Yeah, and so could medieval dramas that depict the Middle Ages as backwards and superstitious. But no one cries foul about Game of Thrones because it’s just plain good to watch. I think.”

        The difference is where the central entertainment factors needs a world that is mechanically different from reality to be more dramatic. The important entertainment factors in a ‘historical’ medieval drama is different to one about a fantasy drama.

        A central aspect of a dinosaur game is the setting, and the fact the setting corresponds to what we know about the past. Otherwise they could have easily set this on another planet with even more fantastic creatures, or parallel universe.

  2. CoreTechs says:

    That looks awesome!

    +10 Strong Bad points for the tile.

  3. Clavus says:

    Just gave it a spin. Need to change my pants. Very intimidating demo!

  4. Tinotoin says:

    Curse you ramming speed dragonfly!

  5. raiders says:

    for what those googles cost, you better show me a f*** more than THAT!

  6. Premium User Badge

    Serrit says:

    Hah I was wondering why the article seemed so familiar – “I’m sure I’ve read this already, but I haven’t checked RPS yet today and it’s not a Supporter post brought forward so I must be going mad…”.

  7. DanMan says:

    Queen Pun has stricken again.

    See what I did there? No? Me neither.

  8. roothorick says:

    That T-Rex they really put a lot of work on. His SINUSES have their own individual bones. Holy crap.

  9. tonicer says:

    Wow … but what’s with that overly aggressive dragonfly? I have lots of dragonflies in my garden each year and i’m lucky if i can get close to them.