Darkest Dungeon’s Shape-Shifting Abomination Class

You and me both.

Sure, your mighty heroes might have already become quivering wrecks who run screaming when they see a spider in the bathtub, but Darkest Dungeon [official site] can get darker yet. The fab roguelikelike (#34 on our list of best RPGs!) is still in Early Access, meaning more horrors and nasties are sure to come. Some of them might join your party. The ‘Inhuman Bondage’ update (ooh that’s dark!) this week added the new Abomination class, who can switch between human and beast form. Your party may not be wholly thrilled about that transformation.

The Abomination was designed by a Kickstarter backer. Oh, what mind could be darker than a Kickstarter backer’s! Developers Red Hook Studios explain the Abomination:

“A brooding and desperate man, the Abomination has been outcast, branded and imprisoned due to the ‘sickness’ that lies within him. Completely unlike any other hero to wander into the Hamlet thus far, the Abomination can switch between two forms during combat: human and beast. Each form has different combat skills, so you’ll need to figure out the strengths of each. But beware: the Abomination unsettles religious heroes so much that they refuse to serve with him. Additionally, the emergence of a beast in combat is a stressful event for other party members! Fortunately, they recover somewhat when the Abomination returns to his brooding (but human) self.”

The patch notes also detail two new Kickstarter-designed enemies, The Collector and The Madman. Would rather not know what The Collector collects. But who collects The Collectors? You’ll also find the patch notes go on about higher stress in high-level missions, a revision of heart attacks to tone down the insta-death, permanent debuffs for people who almost die, class balance tweaks, fixes, and other odds and ends. If you go delving into dungeons, you’ll probably want to read about these before playing.

Darkest Dungeon is due to properly launch on January 19th. Also, hey! You’ve got just over an hour to get it cheap in the Steam sale.

20 Comments

  1. MrFinnishDude says:

    Wow, that… certainly is a name for an update. Saucy.

    • MikoSquiz says:

      I suspect it’s an arbitrary reference to W. Somerset Maugham’s “Of Human Bondage”.

      Either that or they’re tying the “emergence of the beast” bit into Spinoza’s thoughts on self-control, but that seems going a bit far for the name of an update.

  2. Lord Custard Smingleigh says:

    Heroes descend into the depths. But which are deeper: The depths they delve, or the depths they reach at the limits of their despair? Only the cold, bitter soil knows.

  3. Coming Second says:

    Nice little update. The abomination’s a lot of fun to use and the Collector’s a superbly creepy invention.

    The economy is still in a state though, and they really need to look at that before the full release. The grind involved to upgrade the hamlet at the higher levels, and to decontaminate heroes, is absurd.

  4. Premium User Badge

    teije says:

    Can’t wait for this to reach full release. I’ve reached the self-imposed 20-hour limit on EA games long ago on this.

  5. Celerity says:

    I’m surprised by this one. They spent an entire patch doing nothing but make features that punish you for doing anything other than the one incredibly powerful thing (damage) and reward you for doing that. Their censorship has calmed down (mostly because they ran out of targets) but their design hasn’t improved. The best part about it is that even in the miraclous event they should finally make this game honestly advertised as difficult, the large casual audience they deliberately retained will just revolt instead.

    Of course, given that not a single one of their major features even functioned as intended on release, or after the 5th or so fix in the last day we’re still a long way off from that. Tedious, absolutely. But difficult? Roguelike? Difficult decisions? Tactics? We’re further from all those than we were 10 months ago, and that’s all the result of Early Access devs censoring critical feedback about the game mechanics.

    • Machinations says:

      No, its not due to censoring self-important people like yourself who harangued everyone who didnt conform to your opinion.

      Im glad you were banned, and Im not alone.

      • Celerity says:

        Of course you are. That is because the only support this game has left are shills who advocate censorship by Early Access developers, and people that don’t know better and don’t understand what sort of company they are supporting. Which makes my posts very useful as a warning, and yours very useful as an assist.

        • king0zymandias says:

          I have no horse in this race, haven’t even played the game. But what I will say is this, the developer has absolutely no responsibility to listen to criticism and feedback from the consumers or the critics. They might choose to, if it meshes with their artistic intent, but they absolutely don’t have to. It’s their game, they can do whatever they want. You don’t like it, great, don’t play it. Tell everyone why you don’t like it, that’s fine too. But don’t go around pretending like they owe you something and that they did something wrong by not listening to feedback.

          • Celerity says:

            You’d be right… if they did not enter both crowdfunding and Early Access. As they did, on both counts, and the purpose of both involves taking feedback, ignoring that feedback and still taking people’s money is therefore unacceptable. And that’s the first of many things they did wrong. And then censoring any feedback that makes them look bad (which is most of it)?

        • schuelertomas says:

          you clearly dont understand neither crowdfunding nor early access. the purpose of those two are: getting some money.

          will they, as a side product also get feedback? yeah. are they supposed to listen to any of the feedback? nope.

          really easy.

          it is as the person before me wrote: you took yourself to important. just take a step back and realise it is not your game. it is theire game. and they can do 100% whatever they wanna do, despite your feedback and YES, despite beeing on crowdfunding plattforms actively.

    • schuelertomas says:

      you clearly dont understand neither crowdfunding nor early access. the purpose of those two are: getting some money.

      will they, as a side product also get feedback? yeah. are they supposed to listen to any of the feedback? nope.

      really easy.

      it is as the person before me wrote: you took yourself to important. just take a step back and realise it is not your game. it is theire game. and they can do 100% whatever they wanna do, despite your feedback and YES, despite beeing on crowdfunding plattforms actively.

  6. Premium User Badge

    Ericusson says:

    This game looked promising but has become a chore and only a chore.
    One guy from Obsidian summed it up perfectly on the rpg-codex forums.

    In the end, the dev of this game have made a mess of what looked promising and it’s really a shame.

    • Premium User Badge

      Ericusson says:

      Also this post by Jeff Vogel summarises pretty well the flame warriors of early access “make it harder” dudes and where Darkest Dungeon kinda has fallen.

      A really good read for what can be found in DD forums but also in the nuclear throne community for example.

      • johntheemo says:

        Good reads, thanks for sharing. It’s good to see that this is a fairly common opinion. I was starting to think I was crazy for thinking the game wasn’t fun at all seeing all of the (largely positive) press it’s gotten, even post the corpse-update fiasco.

      • Machinations says:

        I like difficult games – you dont, and thats OK.
        What I dont understand is why people insist that the game be made to conform to their vision, as opposed to the developers.

        Honestly, this is all an argument against early access. Just find some outside investors, because dealing with entitled ‘fans’ and a supportive shit-stirring press must be a nightmare, IMO.

        • Celerity says:

          I love difficult games. What everyone hates however are tedious games. By doing all this stuff, they did not accomodate “difficulty fetishists”. Do I look accomodated? They might believe they are making the game difficult, but what they’re actually doing is turning both casual and hardcore against them through extreme tedium, grind, blandness, and one dimensional, lazy, uninspired decisions which they will then censor any critics of.

          As for the “largely positive press”, the game’s review fodder. It looks great for a few hours and then you see what it truly is after… 5. Since a typical review time is around… 3, the result is a lot of positive blind media attention. Likewise, their obsession with video content producers. The game seems kind of ok if you watch an unskilled, distracted gamer for a short time.

          Why do you see more negative attention? Jim Sterling Son, and Celerity Son. That’s honestly it, no one else is seriously calling them out. Yet.

      • LionsPhil says:

        Vogel’s writings are usually worth the time.

        (Also, ho ho, someone in the comments arguing he should have made the post more difficult to read.)

  7. Jakkar says:

    And things? Well, things… They tend to accumulate.

  8. Immobile Piper says:

    Quite excited for this. But still, I’d be a fool to buy this before it launches. That and read some post-launch reviews to make sure it’s worth it.

    Here’s hoping they do good.