Inkle’s Sorcery! Adaptation Finally Hits PC In February

Ever since I played globetrotting adventure 80 Days I’ve been looking forward to Inkle’s other adaptation, Sorcery! [official site], finally hitting PCs. Earlier this week we said parts one and two were on the way “very, very soon.” Now we can amend that to a real date: February 2nd.

Part three is set to follow this spring, while part four will see a simultaneous cross-platform release “later this year.” It’ll all be on Windows and Mac.

If you’re unfamiliar, Sorcery! is an adaptation of Steve Jackson’s adventure gamebooks of the same name, hailing from the Fighting Fantasy series of the 1980s. If you’re too young to know what a gamebook was, think of it like a cross between a tabletop RPG and a choose-your-own-adventure. And if you’re too young to know what a choose-your-own-adventure was, think of it like a video game… in a book.

Kids these days.

So yes, Inkle have been adapting these video-games-in-a-book into proper video games, and from what I’ve heard they’ve done a brilliant job. Blending the studio’s knack for interactive fiction and some light combat, parts one through three have been out on phones for a while now. According to Inkle, the desktop release “will retain the masterful storytelling, artwork, and production values of the mobile originals, with larger text, new music, and a refined user interface providing a comfortable playing experience on bigger screens.”

It’s basically the same thing they did with 80 Days, and I’m excited. For more on Sorcery!—like, much more—be sure to check out our extensive interview with Inkle heads Jon Ingold and Joseph Humfrey earlier this week.

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8 Comments

  1. anHorse says:

    Yay

    Perfect timing too, get to play it to death before XCOM 2

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    caff says:

    Great – really looking forward to this!

  3. Nereus says:

    I’m very please Inkle are bringing their series to PC, while I think they make much better tablet-in-bed gameplay, they are one of my favourite developers and I’ll be picking these up just to support them.

  4. Telemikus says:

    Oh my days! As I scrolled down Facebook I caught a glimpse of the image out of the corner of my eye and saw ‘Shamutanti Hills’. This stopped my scrolling dead in it’s mouse notch. That was a name I thought I’d never see written anywhere ever again.

    Oh my days. Really excited for this, especially as ’80 days’ was so well received by the RPS crew.

    Even after reading… err playing… through all of the Fighting Fantasy books (up to about the early forties editions) many times as a kid ‘Sorcery’ was the one that stoked up my imagination the most.

    I still have no idea what a ‘Throben door’ is though.

    Actually, after typing that I Googled it and now do. Gotta love them interwebs

  5. chuckieegg says:

    By Courga’s grace and Fourga’s Pride,
    One lock made of Golem’s Hide,
    Tumblers two sealed deep inside,
    I bid you Portals open wide.

    I still remember all these years later. I hope they don’t include the horrible statue kissing puzzle though.

    • syllopsium says:

      They do, but if you’ve had the right hint, it’s easy.

  6. syllopsium says:

    It’s absolutely fab on tablet, so I’m looking forward to it hitting the PC. Crucially, the games are much improved over the books, and represent the way everyone actually played them : with one finger between the pages in case you wanted to go back to a prior decision, and ignoring the stipulation that you couldn’t study the spellbook after the opening of the first book..

  7. TheAngriestHobo says:

    “If you’re too young to know what a gamebook was, think of it like a cross between a tabletop RPG and a choose-your-own-adventure. And if you’re too young to know what a choose-your-own-adventure was, think of it like a video game… in a book.”

    If you’re too young to know what a book is, it’s like a Kindle made of trees. If you’re too young to know what a tree is, you should know that global warming is the previous generation’s fault.