Homestuck Adventure Game Hiveswap Begins January

Hiveswap [official site], the adventure game spun off from mega-popular webcomic Homestuck, will launch its Act 1 in January 2017. That’s the word from developers What Pumpkin, who’ve popped back up after an extended silence. Hiveswap is not a direct adaptation of the comic, which… has itself been a sort of adventure game at times, directed by readers, but it’s… look, it’s fine, the idea was for folks to be able to enjoy it without knowing anything about Homestuck. That’s what I heard. I don’t know. I don’t have time to dive down this rabbit hole of different dimensions and universe reboots and… look, watch these moving pictures:

See? Easy to understand. There are monsters outside your house. Your brother is trapped in his treehouse. You’re in the house. And off you go: solve puzzles and bop monsters in the face. I can follow that.

January 2017 is when Hiveswap will kick off, and it’s been a long time coming. A Kickstarter in 2012 funded a Homestuck adventure game, which was originally being made by The Odd Gentleman. In-house studio What Pumpkin have since taken over. They went silent for a long while too, the game quietly delayed from a planned spring 2015 launch, but now we know: Hiveswap Act 1 is due in January 2017.

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  1. Senethro says:

    Last I heard about this some kind of scammer game development studio that “specialized” in making licensed properties stole their money, neil gaimans and other peoples money and ran off with it to hide behind out of court settlements and legal injunctions.

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      Jekadu says:

      Got any sources on the Gaiman thing? I think you might be mixing up stories. I’ve only heard rumours about this game getting stiffed.

    • Author X says:

      The rumour I saw (in a very extensive tumblr post that was later deleted at the request of What Pumpkin, so grain of salt etc) was that The Odd Gentlemen took their money to develop the game, spent that money making the new King’s Quest game because it’s more prestigious and the devs are KQ fans, and basically admitted that the few pieces of concept art they sent WP was all they’d done with it after some extensive period. They eventually came to a settlement where WP got the rest of the money that TOG hadn’t spent yet, in exchange for not suing them or telling anybody what happened.

      The result was that What Pumpkin then had to create their own in-house studio and start over, already late, from scratch with a portion of the money they started with. And the Homestuck Comic was on hold for a long time (and became infamous for stopping when it was supposed to be close to ending) while the author dealt with all this.

      I haven’t heard about Wayward Manor’s involvement in all this, but looking it up, it was also announced to be developed by The Odd Gentlemen. But the Steam store lists a different developer, Moonshark (and apparently it was also terrible, which is why I never picked it up). So it seems entirely possible they faffed around with that one too until it was taken to another studio to pick up the pieces behind-schedule and under-budgeted.

      edit: Looking around old internet rumour-mill someone pointed out Wayward Manor used to list The Odd Gentlemen as the developer, and Moonshark as only the publisher, but that was removed and TOG removed all their blog posts about developing WM from their site. Which suggests to me that either they wanted to remove the evidence of making a licensed game that bombed, or they were removed as part of some Homestuck-esque legal settlement.

  2. invitro says:

    “mega-popular webcomic Homestuck” — I hope you’re not using “mega-popular” just a tad too casually.

    • Sonntam says:

      Nah, mega-popular is okay. Mega-ultra-popular would have been a bit over the top, though.

    • Author X says:

      It certainly was during its active years, especially if you went to almost any fan-convention and saw the flood of trolls. The kickstarter itself, which was really more of a merchandise sales-drive than a donation fundraiser, raised $2.4 million in revenue. Obviously that wasn’t all profit for the game, but it is the amount of money that the fans poured into the project.

    • aliasi says:

      Between the $2.4 million, the fantroll horde at most geek-related conventions, and everything else… yeah, ‘mega-popular’ is quite accurate. It’s actually quite astonishing how amazingly popular Homestuck is yet never QUITE having made it into the ‘mainstream’.

  3. oyog says:

    Sometimes I feel bad for Andrew Hussie. I’m probably projecting but sometimes I wonder if he even wanted the fan base he got.

    He signed my copy of Problem Sleuth at a tiny “webcomicon” in Easthampton, MA around the time Homestuck was getting internet popular and he seemed legitimately uncomfortable with the whole situation.

    That could have been because my friend asked Hussie to sign a bucket though.

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      Jekadu says:

      I’m not entirely sure I should be admitting that the last sentence makes complete sense to me.

    • Tendehka says:

      Oh hey, I think I was at that exact same “convention”. It was at Topatoco offices and KC Green left in a huff for some reason.

      The reception of Homestuck really does make me feel bad for him. Hussie made some really good works, but the one that takes off is the one that gets him forever associated with some of the worst of the worst con-goers/internet types. (Okay, so a little bit of hyperbole there, but they’re not a popular crowd.)

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