Spaceship-builder Nimbatus seeks funding, offers demo

Nimbatus

What do we even call a game like this? The Banjo Kazooie: Nuts & Bolts of this world. The Besieges, the Space Engineers and similar. There’s enough of them now to feel that we need some kind of definition. I’ll leave that up to you lot to debate in the comments.

Whatever the designation name, it seems a growth field, and now there’s one more of these games in the works – Nimbatus, from new Swiss outfit Stray Fawn Studio. A game wherein you’re tasked with constructing the perfect robo-spacecraft to complete your goals as you explore a procedurally generated universe. It’s shaping up nicely, offering a playable demo, but needs some money in order to reach the finish line.

The gameplay trailer above sums up the gameplay loop in a perfect space-nutshell. Pick an objective, and then build just the right tool for the job. Easier said than done when you’re trying to combine steerability, combat effectiveness, heavy excavation gear and all keep it within a fixed size profile. Other missions might ask you to create something built purely for racing or within a tight budget, forcing some creative engineering.

More technically inclined players may want to check out this longer gameplay video, detailing some of the randomly generated scenarios you can get into. One of the more interesting events is Robo Sumo, a challenge to create a fully autonomous drone guided by sensors and logic gates to locate and push the enemy drone out of the ring before it can do the same to you.

Nimbatus’ Kickstarter is doing okay for now, but could be a bit closer to its initial funding goal. I wonder if part of that is due to this being the first ever I’ve seen asking for money in Swiss Francs (CHF). For some reason, people get cagey about handing over funds in anything other than the ever-familiar US Dollar. Asking for funding in British Pounds struggles enough, and I’ve seen some developers go through an American proxy simply because they can set up their Kickstarter to take USD.

If the thought of bolting together your own little robo-spaceship tickles your fancy, you can throw your money at the Nimbatus Kickstarter here. CHF 14 or more ($14/£11) is counted as a full preorder.

5 Comments

  1. KDR_11k says:

    The Stratosphere: Conquest of the Skies, the …

    I call them block based vehicle builders, there’s certainly a lot of different flavors but I get the impression that most of them are inspired by Minecraft’s success rather than earlier, closer examples of the genre.

    The sheer glut of these games and how many of them are in Early Access with only limited gameplay is probably a hindrance for Kickstarter success as well.

  2. ArchRylen says:

    Take three (apologies if I’m screwing up the commenting section.)

    This reminds me of Reassembly. It’s a similar game that made it all the way through Kickstarter to a finished product. I found the controls were a bit too fast for my taste but I build a number of fun ships before moving on to something else. It also had a pleasant procedurally generated universe.

    I think “block based vehicle builders” sums it up well.

    link to anisopteragames.com

    • brucethemoose says:

      Or Istrolid, which is basically Reassembly with a competitive MP focus.

      Or Starmade, which is kinda a 3D version of that or a hardcore version of Space Engineers, which is also related to Empyrion…

      The sad reality is that there are ALOT of these space-builder games. So many, that the playerbase is too divided to give any of them enough funding for quicker development or a sufficient population for full servers.

    • haldolium says:

      From those I played I enjoyed Reassembly the most. Not necessarily because of the content, which was limited when I last played it, but because of the atmosphere and style.
      It also has one of the better building editors around which is intuitive and quick, unlike a few others.

  3. Zealuu says:

    Engineering sandboxes, maybe? Differentiated from sandbox puzzlers of the Zachtronics variety by the need to also operate your contraption to complete objectives post-build.

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