Steam charts: autumn sale edition

Hey ho, chart fans, let’s go. Statman John is indisposed today, and was last seen meandering along the seafront muttering “Plunkbat! They give me Plunkbat! I’ve a grand idea for a grand theft five five fi-diddly-fi fi whoopsadaisy down we go,” so I’m taking over for this week’s Steam charts. Seeing as he’s always griping about the charts being identical, I’m sure John will be infuriated to miss seeing how much Steam’s autumn sale changed things. Won’t you join for me a stroll down the hit parade?

10. Counter-Strike: Global Offensive

Continuing to put Bryan Adams, Wet Wet Wet, and those other charlatans to shame, Counter-Strike a go-go is still hanging in the top ten. I first played CS back in the Half-Life mod’s beta days and do so enjoy seeing classic bits reborn and reinvigorated over and over across the years and games. That new de_dust2 is a right looker. We ourselves recently declared CS:GO one of the best PC games so cor, CS is officially as praiseworthy as Deadly Premonition.

9. The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt – Game of the Year Edition

Crumbs, £14 for this cracking RPG and both its expansions? That’s not bad, that. Thanks, autumn sale. The Witcher is also one of the best games, we say; it too is as noteworthy as Deadly Premonition. Am I building suspense for a revelation that Deadly Premonition is top of the hit parade this week? Well…

8. Assassin’s Creed Origins

“They thought I disappeared,” Wretch32 sings on the All Stars remix of Labrinth’s Earthquake, “I just did a gap year like a fresher came back like a graduate.” Assassin’s Creed did a gap year and has come back like it visited Egypt during its gap yah. Nothing revolutionary but sure, decent enough, our Asscreedo review broadly said. Statman John has written about enjoying its Photo Mode and swimming, though, and Alex Wiltshire has cooed over its tomb-raiding and radio-controlled eagle.

7. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege

I’m dead impressed that Siege is a permanent fixture on the hit parade. I don’t actually know anyone who still plays it, perhaps because my chums and I are old enough that we want our face-shooting to include elements of Bargain Hunt and rambling so we play Plunkbat, but clearly many people loving shooting through walls to shoot faces. Good on ’em. Rich McCormick tells us it’s still a cracker too. Ubisoft have another year of free content updates planned, including a new cooperative event. The half-price sale on Steam surely helped Siege hang in this week too.

6. Nier: Automata

This is the stuff. Automata is one of my favourite games of the past year and I still wish I had the freedom (from people griping about SPOILERZ) to talk more about some of the places it goes, some of the sights it sees, and some of the terrible tragedies. I adore these sad little robotic warteens. The fisticuffs is good stuff too – not as technical as Platinum’s full-on fight ’em ups but still satisfying. Ah, I like this game a lot and I’m very glad more of you will be experiencing it. I understand its technical problems have put some folks off — and it is shocking that Square Enix have not ordered it fixed — but I suppose a 40% discount in the Steam sale was enough to win many over. I’m glad.

5. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege

Back once again with the renegade master, D for damager, with the ill behaviour. Some people will tell you the lyric is “D4 damager” but are they thinking it’s a pen & paper roleplaying reference? Anyway, as usual, this double appearance is due to how Steam tracks different packages and blah blah.

4. Steam Controller

A big hunk of plastic slams into the charts this week, Valve’s very own strange gamepad-trackpad hybrid doodad. I know Alec didn’t much like the Controller when it first launched in 2015, though I do also know updates from Valve and user-made profiles have done a lot to improve it. Gang, if you’re already Controlling Steam yourself, what hot tips do you have for the many folks who have picked one up during the sale?

3. Steam Link

More plastic! This one is the box used to display games from your PC on your TV or elsewhere, letting PC games go where no PC is. I prefer to play some games on the sofa myself but still schlep my laptop into the lounge, which seems foolish. I should get one of these myself. I’m playing Deadly Premonition on the sofa at the moment. The Steam Link is dead cheap in the sale, down to £4 from £40 – or only £28 bundled with the Steam Controller. As Emma, Geri, Mel, Mel, and Victoria might have said back in the day, “Steam up your life!”

2. Grand Theft Auto V

Here it is! Half-price in the Steam sale, it’s Rockstar’s latest mega-fancy sandbox world. [Disclosure: I sorta know some people who work on GTA but I don’t know them well enough that I would, say, make plans to do something with just them?] I’ve still not finished the campaign but I do like hanging around in its world. Did you read Alyse Stanley’s bit on the joys of eavesdropping in GTA V? Good stuff. Statman John would be disappointed if I didn’t continue his running joke so:

What Are Rockstar Spending All The GTA V Money On?

Covertly replumbing John’s home so wee comes out the taps and he needs to take a week off work.

1. Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds

I am as surprised as you that Deadly Premonition is not #1. Plunkbat crowdsurfs to the top of the hit parade during a big Steam sale despite bearing no discount itself – quite the feat. Plunkbat seems to have reached that critical mass of multiplayer games where people buy it because everyone they know is playing it – my gang of Plunkpals is still expanding with people I didn’t even know liked FPSs. It’s that winning combination of face-shooting, Bargain Hunt, and hiking. I’m playing a lot more aggressively these days and it’s mostly working wonderfully, aside from all the times it goes terribly wrong. But give me an intense and catastrophic loss over a boring near-win any day.

Tradition dictates that I end the Steam charts on a song. I refuse to believe that Cyber Monday is nothing to do with cyberpunk, so here’s some Front Line Assembly:

56 Comments

Top comments

  1. Premium User Badge

    Drib says:

    It says Plunkbat in-game. I mean they even renamed the company Plunkbat Corp.
  1. Dominic Tarason says:

    I crunched some numbers the other day, and at Steam’s new all-time user peak (17.6 million, by the by), Plunkbat accounted for over 43% of all people actually playing a game and not just idling in Steam.

    One game is literally drawing nearly half of all active players on Steam, the biggest digital distro network ever made.

    That’s bananas.

  2. cheesysmell says:

    Oh, I’m one of those Witcher 3 purchasers. Unfortunately I think it’s real shit it didn’t really click with me, and—uncharacteristically for me, though you’ll have to take my word for that—it even left me somewhat bitter about the several hours I put into it expecting it to get enjoyable any moment.

    • brucethemoose says:

      Same.

      My Steam library and the rest of the the universe is saying I should love Witcher 3… But I gave it a few hours, and it just never clicked.

      Then again, I also bounced off Dragon Age: Origins, so maybe I’m just a terrible person.

      • the_anderthal says:

        Yes you are. You want to go home and rethink your life.

      • Munchkinpuncher says:

        What kind of monster are you?!

      • CaptainDju says:

        Well, I’m not surprised you didn’t enjoy TW3 if you also didn’t enjoy DA:O, and it’s okay. Just out of curiosity what aspect turned you off the most in both games?

        • brucethemoose says:

          Honestly, I don’t know.

          I’m not a standard fantasy fan, nor am I fan of the combat in either.

          But neither is a valid excuse, as I played the hell out of Skyrim, Oblivion and KOTOR I/II. Hell, I even trudged through TOR for awhile…

          Maybe I just can’t connect with the fantasy characters? The BGS games aren’t really character driven, and the other RPGs I love are sci-fi, which always draws me in. Come to think of it, I also bounced off PoE (like, 30 minutes in) while I got farther into Tyranny since the setting seemed kinda unique.

    • napoleonic says:

      That was also my reaction to the Witcher franchise. It should have been right up my street, but it was just … rubbish.

      • Someoldguy says:

        I’m curious what Witcher deniers would put up there as a really quality 1st person RPG instead? Skyrim?

        • Sandepande says:

          All I know that I’ve got 600+ hours in Skyrim and about 20 in Witcher. I don’t much care for the Witcher’s setting (Skyrim’s is more generic, so there’s less to bounce off from, except for it being more generic), or characters, so I think it’s that for me.

          As far as gameplay goes, both are about the same.

        • napoleonic says:

          “a really quality 1st person RPG”? My top two of those are probably TES III: Morrowind, and Fallout: New Vegas. But I enjoyed TES IV-V and Fallout 3 as well.

          Anyway, isn’t The Witcher a third-person game?

      • Premium User Badge

        phuzz says:

        I bounced hard of both the first two games, but fell in love with the third.

    • fish99 says:

      I bounced off W3 a couple of times before it clicked. I think if you persist (to the end of the first area) you’d find what everyone else likes about it.

      Having said that I still haven’t come close to beating it since I keep getting distracted by other games, but I can see the quality.

    • Hekkel says:

      For me it also took a while before i liked it. It was only after i disabled most of the (mini)map features so that at least exploring was fun.

    • Solidstate89 says:

      I’m sorry that you’re in possession of a shattered and broken soul and are incapable of loving good things. Life just isn’t fair.

  3. lancelot says:

    I’m playing a lot more aggressively these days

    You mean even more honking?

  4. and its man says:

    Oh sh*t! Front Line Assembly’s Mindphaser. It’s been a while since I last jived to this.

  5. Carra says:

    $15 for the Steam Link is really tempting. But the tv is usually occupied so I’d probably never use it.

  6. sharpmath says:

    Any article full of Alice alt-text is my fave article.

    • khamul says:

      I looked up ‘The Best’ in the dictionary, and it was just a picture of Alice… Oh, wait, sorry, I’m wrong. That was ‘The Beast’.

      It turns out ‘The Best’ is actually this thing called ‘Deadly Premonition’.
      I should try that some time.

    • napoleonic says:

      If only all the articles had tooltips! Brendan does good ones too.

  7. LewdPenguin says:

    Wow that’s a lot of Links sold to hit top 3, since IIRC this chart is on monies made not units sold, and a fair few controllers to boot.

    I remain convinced this heavy discounting is a firesale to shift backlogged stock prior to them announcing Mk2’s of both products next year. Whist I can see them still having a margin on the controller, £4 a go for the link must be at a loss unless the whole thing is a single off the shelf chip inside, and frankly even then component and shipping costs are probably still going to be more than that.

  8. Artist says:

    Front Line Assembly linked on RPS? Holy cow, Alice – you just proved that youre the most valuable asset on RPS! Again!
    Chapeau!

  9. racccoon says:

    Wait till next year it’ll be cheaper. lol friggin steam.

  10. The Sero says:

    The Steam Controller review is locked behind a paywall? The one from 2015? That’s disappointing, being both useful and old. Anyone want to summerise?

    For my 2 cents, I really like the Steam Controller. Literally the only 2 faults I could find with it are that a) it felt cheaply made (although, it’s plenty sturdy from the looks of it, couple of years in and none of the 4 I see regularly have had an issue, despite some pretty crappy treatment (including a ~5 year old child using it)), and b) it’s quite large, but like the original xbox controller (not the ORIGINAL controller, the second slightly smaller controller for the original xbox) it’s fine for all but the smallest of hands, and even then seems alright (see above about a ~5 year old child using it).

    Everything an xbox controller can do it does just as well (perhaps with a slight learning curve with the trackpad, you’ve got to remember we’ve had 20 years practice with analogue sticks), with the added bonus it can do other things AND be customised really easily.

    What were the problems Alec found? I’m curious.

    EDIT: Oh, yeah, there was one more annoying issue that now jumps to mind. The batteries are really annoying to get out, and you need to put a ribbon behind them or such really. That’s bloody frustrating, I grant you.

    • Munchkinpuncher says:

      I HATE trying to get the damn batteries out of them. Its crazy I thought I was doing it wrong and I was gonna break something and they still don’t come out.

    • Wings says:

      IIRC and a probably don’t, Alex’s beefs were: the first run controlers sometimes had manufacturing flaws, lack of software side support, and lack of tactile bump or something to help find center on the track pads. I think he said he liked them but wait to buy in. ((2 year old memories, sorry if I’m wrong XD))

  11. Hieronymusgoa says:

    “Jesus…had days like this.” Oh man, some really good musical taste right there, thanks RPS!

  12. Tomo says:

    Alice, can I come play with you guys please?

    I’ve similarly grown out of dull near-wins and into stalking and hunting people from the moment I get a gun, but most of my chums have yet to graduate :(

  13. Deano2099 says:

    With all the loot crate stuff going around recently, one of the strangest (non-spoiler) things Nier Automata does is give you a shop where you can spend in game gold to purchase achievements you can’t be bothered to unlock “properly”. Almost loot boxes in reverse – pay money earned in game for an “out of game” boost (albeit only for those that care about showing off achievement stats).

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