Rust is out of early access – here are its best patch notes

rust-patches-1

The nasty, brutish and (often) short survival game Rust has finally crept out of its early access cave today and is sauntering around firing shotgun shells of joy into the sky and also into bodies of people it doesn’t know and doesn’t trust. That’s a simplistic reduction of a five-year process which has seen this Prometheus of the survival genre go from being a janky axe-flailer to a more polished gunslinger. How can we possibly chart all the small changes that shaped this game’s development? I know! By looking at its patch notes without context.

Alternatively, we could chat to its lead designer, Garry Newman, about the survival genre, battle royale games and how – when you think about – “release day” means nothing, since work on Rust is set to continue even after launch. But I already did all that. So to better illustrate the game’s journey to completion, here are some cherry picked patchnote entries running the course of its creation. They are snapshots in time, and the benefit of these incremental changes is unquestionable.

December 17, 2013

Doors will no longer fly away

January 25, 2014

Grass looks way better

February 17, 2014

Fixed being killed by harvesting resources

October 10, 2014

Fixed players wearing a burlap shirt being unhittable

March 13, 2015

Corpses hang around for 30 minutes, instead of 2 minutes

August 20, 2015

Fixed black beenie skin not being black

December 3, 2015

Added sounds to the corpse fly swarms

December 17, 2015

Added comfort-giving bear

April 14, 2016

Added eyebrows

September 15, 2016

Better explosion sounds

November 16, 2016

Pumpkins can no longer be stacked

April 13, 2017

AI sleeps

AI reacts to gun shots

AI eats corpses

September 28, 2017

Can pick up empty fridge

January 11, 2018

Slightly darker sky at midnight

February 1, 2018

AI can no longer ghost through barricades

We’ve been playing Rust for ages. Rich had a punt at its earliest incarnation, while Matt played a later version (he’s also working on our full review now). I once wandered about with its terrible people and Alec also thunk some time into it. If that’s not enough, Dan Gril did some philosophising about it too. We’ve given quite a few words to this naked wanderer. But I suppose when you’ve been flouncing around with your willy out for this long, somebody is going to grab on.

Rust is on Steam for £27.79/€31.99/$34.99.

3 Comments

  1. Turkey says:

    Goddammit, Jeff. Where are those eyebrows? It’s been 3 years…