Powerdrill into my heart by supporting these murder games to help a Good Pupper

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Here’s a mega-bummer. The video game creators behind a small indie horror game called FAITH have gone through a hard time. They made a very MS-DOS based spooky scare game that would be a real fun experience for you to engage with right now, and they bundled it with some other retro horror titles. Unfortunately, they had to do so quickly as a fundraiser because their dog was just attacked, and this is an immediate fundraiser to help save a tiny pupper’s life.

The collection of games features five different titles. They range from games that invite a Sierra questing level of puzzle solving into a level of VHS jump-scare hellscape that really messed with my heart and ability to sleep. They’re good games, Brent. Just don’t play them right before bed.

I appreciate everything on display here. A few of these are games I saw previously and said “okay at some point I’ll grab that” and the rest of the bundle is new or surprisingly little psychological terror injunctions. But what brings ’em together? Some genuine hurt. And a desire to do some genuine good.

The devs behind Faith had their tiny pupper hurt when when a bigger dog got off a leash and attacked. They all banded together to raise some money to help cover medical costs, and thus far this Retro Spooky bundle has made more money for Jane than expected. It is perhaps worth you time to check out the content from DDD Wares, Airdorf, WildArts, Puppet Combo. You know, just real good folks all around, doing some adorable pet saving, and passing a 75% savings on to you.

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Please let us know if you dabbled in the game collection and what you thought. And of course, also let us know if you feel good about helping a good pupper come back to life, even if your game characters keep dying terribly.

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Update to the story below:

And a further update below. This is such good news but of course, like, vet bills plague people for years. Consider still chipping something in their way, especially for some great weirdo horror.

If you’re on the fence, maybe check out some of these playthrough videos from included games:

And here’s The Nothing. You want The Nothing? I think you want The Nothing. You deserve The Nothing.

30 Comments

  1. PancakeWizard says:

    “Pupper”

    No. Stop talking like an infant.

    • R. Totale says:

      Rude

    • TeePee says:

      Was this really the place to make that stand, dude? Somewhere in the region of 80% of the internet uses the term. Bearing in mind the post is about helping some good folks look after their sick dog, you’re just coming across as mean-spirited. :-/

      Sometimes it’s better just to let stuff slide, man.

      • Babymech says:

        But then, a non-zero percent of the internet also thinks “break their bones fairly quickly” when they see the word pupper. Also, way to imagine that 80% of the internet speaks English, let alone speaks meme.

        • TeePee says:

          One of us has missed something somewhere. Either I’m missing your sarcasm, or you’re missing my comedic exaggeration. :)

    • Seafoam says:

      Aren’t you a beacon of sensibilty in this world of people who are beneath you.

    • Barts says:

      Dear Sir, I honestly consider you to be chowderheaded commode-licking cod-piece.

    • poliovaccine says:

      You’re not speaking like an adult here, just an asshole. See, adults have this awareness of context and, in general, “what is or is not appropriate.” Exercising THAT sense is to speak like an adult. Impulsively insulting others for incredibly idiosyncratic reasons, however, is a mint perfect example of infantile behavior.

      And anyway, you identify as “Pancake Wizard” on a videogames website. Your serious pants do not fit.

    • Don Reba says:

      Mature adults write “doggo”.

    • allison says:

      A spiteful little pupper you are!

      Pupper, pupper, pupper, pupper, pupper

  2. jomurph86 says:

    “No. Stop talking like an infant.”

    lol :D Is this what you imagine adults talk like?

  3. Kefren says:

    Bought, and shared with my readers on social media. That’s the second game/bundle I’ve bought on itch.io in two days, having never used the site before yesterday! Good stuff. I liked the way you don’t have to create an account.

    As to the person who objected to the word “pupper” – it’s an affectation. RPS often uses words playfully. It made me smile. Believe me, as a writer and editor, if there are linguistic errors I am the first to let my underpants burst into flames. But the word works in the context in which it was used. RPS – thanks for this article flagging up a combined good cause and a bundle of interesting horror games I hadn’t heard of.

  4. StryderAR says:

    Just paid 20. I know what it feels like to have a dog and have it suffering or ill. They are part of the family.

    I hope Jane makes a full recovery!

  5. satan says:

    ‘I don’t want to say the breed of the dog’

    Yeah good idea, sometimes even just mentioning the word pitbull can set off a flame war that lasts months.

    • Barts says:

      It’s not the fault of the breed. It’s not the indivdual animal’s fault. It’s human’s fault.

      • Seafoam says:

        Well you see, at this point another commenter says something about how a breed has been bred with such qualities in mind or somesuch, and the argument continues on ad nauseam.

        • poliovaccine says:

          Aaand then someone replies that, in the unresolved question of nature vs. nurture, this or any breed’s genetic dispositions can be drastically overridden by training or lack thereof.

          Anyway, it could just as easily have been a Doberman, another breed with a reputation for being bitey, and one from which I’ve known more sweethearts than attack dogs.

          Also – for many years I had a Bassett Hound. That breed doesn’t have any special reputation for being vicious, on the contrary, they’re known for being clowns, but they were *bred for* hunting *badgers,* some of the most vicious game you can hunt. Their bodies were designed to fit down badger tunnels, their splayed “ballerina’s” front paws were meant to help them push their way back out of the tunnel if the badger defensively collapsed it… even their long ears were meant to help sweep scent up off the ground and towards their nose from a wider radius. The “white flag” on the end of their tail was meant to make the short dog visible in tall grass.

          But they aren’t typically acquired as hunting dogs these days, and so that prophecy doesn’t tend to self-fulfill. But they’re not small dogs, they’re about Labrador-sized but with short legs, and their jaws are as massive and powerful as any breed of that size – albeit more shin-to-crotch height. They’re absolutely capable of doing real damage to people if they want… but generally they’re acquired to be a family dog, raised as such, and most of what people know about em is that they’re good with kids.

          I’ve known plenty of Pitbulls and Dobermans (Dobermen?) and none ever attacked anyone, nor any dog. On the contrary, they were clownish, affable dogs who let children play with their ears. But that’s because they were raised that way, and trained that way. On the other hand, those breeds are more typically what people look to when they WANT an attack dog. So they acquire them and train them accordingly.

          Living in Brooklyn I got in more than a few arguments on the street, because it was common as hell to see somebody walking their Pit, only to stop for a moment and *smack* the dog across the face, then move along. This is because they all share along the (sadly correct) notion that, if you consistently abuse and piss off your dog, it will eventually come to act as vicious and defensively as any human being who’s been similarly abused and antagonized so much, for so long. Thing is, a loving, friendly dog will still defend a family it loves and which treats it well, just as viciously as a mean old junkyard hound. This would tend to be the crux of my sidewalk fights with these fucks who slap their dogs around in attempts at breaking their good nature.

          It seems likely to me that there are more vicious Pits and Dobies out there than vicious Golden Retrievers, but not because of any genetic proclivity – rather, because they’re more what people tend to choose when they WANT an attack dog.

          Last month a friend of mine from Brooklyn had a litter of Pits from his own pair of sweet, docile purebreds (who, by the way, are great with his young children). He wanted me to take the last one he couldn’t find a home for, and what he said to me was, “I’ll be honest, I could sell him for like a G out there in BK man, but I don’t wanna do that, yknow? I’d rather give him to you, even though I know you can’t pay me like that, so don’t worry, I ain’t asking… it’s just that, you know how it is out there man, people in the hood only ever get a Pit cus they wanna make it *mean* and that means they’re gonna treat it like *shit.* But I know how you are, I know you’ll take good care of him – cus I just don’t have the space or I’d keep him myself, but I want him going to a good home, where they gonna raise him right, you feel me?”

          I wasn’t in a position to take the dog – which broke my heart, cus holy hell I wanted to – but I did my best to help find someone decent who could. Because he knew as well as I do that the breed isn’t nearly half as important as the training and the treatment it receives… and, as a Pitbull, that puppy was far likelier to be purchased *as an attack dog,* and be raised to that end. Not because of the *breed* itself, but because of what *people* expect from it.

          Incidentally, I never quite understood why people in general are so willing to definitively ascribe certain behavioral and personality traits to breeds of dog when doing so to the same degree with people would be openly racist. Like, yeah, we all have certain genetics and certain proclivities and tendencies as a result. Thing is, the inescapable parts of that are stuff like *hair color,* and *skin color,* and *general bone structure,* and so forth… whereas things like personality and temper are seen to be far more a function of the individual and their upbringing. We tend to accept that when it comes to human beings, but with dogs our view of “breeds” can sometimes be as antiquated as phrenology.

          I like to think these folks didn’t mention the breed because they’re aware of the stereotype, and also the fact that stereotypes, while always coming from somewhere, are also always unfair, and inaccurate just as much as they’re not. Though the fact they go out of their way to mention breed at all, even if all they say is that they won’t identify it, does make me wonder if they don’t hold some bit of a grudge regardless – since clearly they knew what folks would infer.

          Dogs are bred towards certain ends, and they wind up being distinctive and different. People aren’t specifically bred towards different ends (unless you ascribe to the whole “ancient aliens seeded us here” thing), but they still wind up being distinctive and different. That said, a person’s genetic background is not the be-all-end-all indicator of their personality and behavior in the future. So why are people so willing to think that way when it comes to dogs? That, I’ve never understood.

          But mainly, I’ve known many dogs in my life, including many Pitbulls and Dobermans/men (like I say, I used to live in Brooklyn), and the only dog attacks I’ve ever seen personally came from a black lab. When I was an infant our family black lab used to hear me crying, and come into my room and circle my crib and lick my hand through the bars until I called down enough to sleep, and when I’d wake up she’d still be there in the morning. Although in college, another black lab nearly bit my girlfriend’s nose off, thoroughly unprovoked. The key detail in these cases wasn’t the breed of dog – it was the fact that the owner of the second black lab was a rapist piece of shit whose own personality was domineering and frequently violent.

          So I mean, I definitely know where I stand on that particular issue. “Nature VERSUS nurture” only implies what is a totally false dichotomy.

      • AngoraFish says:

        Nuclear weapons are all the fault of humans too, but I’d still prefer that we get rid of nuclear weapons since that’s hella easier than getting rid of moronic humans.

        • poliovaccine says:

          A.) Given their entrenched role in international politics today, I’d say getting rid of nukes is about *equally* as impossible as getting rid of moronic humans – short of WWIII… in either case. Just look at nuclear disarmament in MGSV for an example.

          B.) Nuclear weapons are not living things whose behavior is variable according to their treatment and upbringing.

          • AngoraFish says:

            B.) Nuclear weapons are not living things whose behavior is variable according to their treatment and upbringing AND GENETICS, INCLUDING PHYSICAL BUILD AND TEMPERAMENT, AS WELL AS HISTORICAL ASSOCIATIONS THAT ARE TYPICALLY WHY PEOPLE OWN THEM IN THE FIRST PLACE.

            There, corrected that for you.

            Now I’ve gota run – my leopard needs to be taken for a walk in the park.

  6. Barts says:

    Bought instantly. And I don’t even like horror games. And I prefer cats (have two currently, had many) over dogs.

    But hey, if I can help animal in need and people who cry over her, all by the virtue of RockPaperShotgun, that’s one shot on the house.

  7. mitrovarr says:

    I can appreciate that a fundraiser might be faster than a lawsuit, but I do hope they go after the other dog owner for damages. If your dog gets off leash and savages another dog, you’re liable. There is no reason to let them other dog owner off the hook, and good reasons to hound them even if the funds can be made up another way (to stop then from owning dangerous dogs, for instance).

    • poliovaccine says:

      Agreed, 100% – owners should be held accountable in cases like this. Because, when they’re not, people just blame the breed.

      And, like you say, it’s less about the money than the risk to others in the future. Today’s small dog is tomorrow’s small child.

  8. poliovaccine says:

    I probably would have bought this anyway if it were only horror games. The dog thing is just the icing on the bargain, so to speak.

  9. MrDowntempo says:

    Not actually an MS-DOS executable right? If it is, that’d be a huge bonus for me.

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