Campo Santo acquired by Valve, booze acquired by Campo Santo

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While the company webpage still reads “Campo Santo is a small but scrappy video game developer in San Francisco,” that will probably need some updating in the immediate future. The twelve person team behind Firewatch and the forthcoming In The Valley of Gods has been acquired by Valve, where the team will remain intact. Campo Santo is responsible for critically and commercially successful titles, and they will continue work at Valve in Bellevue wrapping up In The Valley of Gods, which of course, will now be a Valve game.

Campo Santo also became a studio on my birthday in 2013. We share a birthday. That’s pretty trill.

A portion of Campo Santo’s announcement is below, and contains one of the most delightful stories of rum-running, if not the MOST delightful story of rum-running, in modern gaming business.

In Valve we found a group of folks who, to their core, feel the same way about the work that they do (this, you may be surprised to learn, doesn’t happen every day). In us, they found a group with unique experience and valuable, diverse perspectives. It quickly became an obvious match.

Second, while visiting IGN’s headquarters in early 2015 to talk about Firewatch, we came across an undelivered 2011 Game of the Year Award for Portal 2. It happened to be engraved on an unopened bottle of champagne. Never ones to pass up free alcohol, we stole it and drank it to celebrate the launch of Firewatch a year later. So in some sense, this is a return home for us. Well, for that bottle of champagne.

Third, and last, we had a series of long conversations with the people at Valve and everyone shared the satisfaction we take in working with people whose talents dwarf our own to make things we never thought possible. Both sides spoke about our values and how, when you get right down to it, we, as human beings, are hard-limited by the time we have left when it comes to making the things we care about and believe in. They asked us if we’d all be interested in coming up to Bellevue and doing that there and we said yes.

Kotaku reports that the Campo Santo team has already been enjoying the benefits of the merger, including joining Valve at the annual company retreat to Hawaii last week.

Congrats to the entire team on The Big News. This can only mean good things for the inevitable release of Valley, right? Campo Santo also promises to keep supporting Firewatch and releasing their quarterly literary magazine. I know many of you were concerned about the quarterly literary magazine. The quarterly literary magazine is fine.

62 Comments

Top comments

  1. Retroblique says:

    Okay, I get it. Many people are averse to change. And a progressive indie studio such as Campo Santo ("hurray!") joining a big, evil, corporate monolith such as Valve ("boo!", "hiss!") is going to get people jumping on all sorts of bandwagons. But how about we assume, just for one minute, that what's happening is happening because a bunch of people who are a) very talented game developers, and b) have more collective experience in the industry than everyone in this comment section put together, held a series of very long and frank discussions about this acquisition and that both parties believe they're doing it with the best of intentions?

    The way this is all playing out on social media, you'd think this was some Looney Tunes cartoon from the 1930s where the big bad wolf tricked the three little pigs into signing building permits for their three little houses, and now they're sitting tied up in a bag while he slices onions and carrots over a cauldron of boiling water.

    I get it, people have issues with Valve. Actually, I don't quite get ALL of them, but I know people are disappointed with them for turning Steam into the iTunes of video games, for apparently turning their back on PC gamers who would rather have more HL/Portal/L4D than Counter-Strike and Dota, for being all secretive and hands off with the press, for their dalliances with Steam boxes, SteamOS, and VR, for whatever the hell Greenlight was, etc. There's a lot of reasons to be raising one's eyebrow at Valve right now, but... Valve once made great games. Jeez: Half-Life 2, Portal 2, Team Fortress 2, and Left 4 Dead! If Valve want to get back to game development and make that a priority, I can't think of a better starting point than acquiring the talents of an indie studio such as Campo Santo.

    I see a lot of people mocking Valve for "no longer knowing how to make games" and "resorting to hiring people who do". You know, I'm sorry to break this to some of you, but that's kinda how video game development works. If a development studio need to produce a particular thing, THEY HIRE THE PEOPLE WHO KNOW HOW TO MAKE THAT THING. If a development studio want to take themselves in a particular direction, THEY HIRE THE PEOPLE WHO KNOW HOW TO GET THERE. It seems as if people expect Gabe to stick his head around the door of the accounting department at Valve and announce to Bob, Sue, and Rita that they need to put down those spreadsheets and fire up the Source SDK, because it's now game-making time.

    But it's true, Valve DOES need to restructure as a games developer. In case you hadn't noticed, almost all the people who were responsible for the likes of Half-Life 2, Portal 2, L4D, etc. within a wide variety of capacities no longer work for Valve. They haven't had huge teams of designers, artists, and writers all sitting around twiddling their thumbs since Portal 2 shipped in 2011. They all eventually drifted away and can now be found at places like Arkane, Bioware, Crystal Dynamics, Eidos Montreal, Naughty Dog, Insomniac, etc.

    No, Valve need to rebuild. Getting Richard Garfield on board was smart. Getting Campo Santo on board is smarter. There will be more studio acquisitions to come and other personnel to fill in the gaps. I really can't see this as anything other than an exciting opportunity for many talented people and there's a very, very good chance it's going to lead to some exciting, innovative games. Let's find a teensy bit of positivity here, folks, and encourage Valve and the folks from Campo Santo. If you've already decided this is all doomed to failure then maybe you need to reexamine your own attitude to video games and the gaming industry. Healthy scepticism is fine, but I'm seeing a lot of borderline hostility in some quarters. Let's just all take a deep breath. This is going to be okay.
  1. SaintAn says:

    Sad news. Firewatch was so good that it felt like something I lived and not a game I played. Valve is a horrible greedy corporation that destroys everything it touches and waste peoples time. I expect in 5-7 years of not releasing anything the developers will quit Valve to go work on something, only to realize they lost their talent when they sold out like so many others.

    • causticnl says:

      you forgot mentioning Gabe burns babies to heat his penthouse.

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      Malarious says:

      Funny, I’m concerned too — but in the opposite direction. From what I’ve seen of the way the Campo Santo staff carries themselves on social media (Twitter especially) I can only hope they don’t bring their bad politics with them into Valve. If they just stick to making games and don’t try to effect change on the Steam storefront, then great, but their past behavior doesn’t give me confidence.

      • thenevernow says:

        Do you think they will have the power to change anything in the way Valve or Steam work? Why and how?

        • Premium User Badge

          Malarious says:

          Sure, from what we know about how Valve operates (the handbook and interviews with ex-employees). Campo Santo isn’t signing on with Valve: the employees are being subsumed. I’m sure they’ll finish their game, but what comes after that? Valve allocates bonuses based on how your peers evaluate your contribution to the company. Developing systems that generate continuous revenue (Steam marketplace, trading cards, Greenlight, etc) are obviously going to be more profitable long-term than releasing games, so there’s a natural pressure for employees to gravitate towards those kinds of projects, especially when bonuses can climb to the low seven figures.

          If the ex-Campo Santo employees can make a case for changing the Steam storefront, then we should expect to see changes, because they aren’t ‘ex-Campo Santo employees’ — they’re fully-fledged Valve employees.

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        Mikemcn says:

        What bad politics and whatever they are, how would their politics possibly affect the steam page?

        • Thulsa Hex says:

          Campo Santo is a progressive bunch, and Steam is a cesspool… so he’s worried that the tiny-studio-turned-employees might ruin the wealthy corporation’s public marketplace by hoping Valve might do something about the Nazis? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

          (Unless I’m completely missing something…)

          • Rikard Peterson says:

            Oh, they’re a good bunch, then? The wording there made me worried that they were GamerGoats or something.

          • MrBehemoth says:

            Thulsa Hex is correct, this is what sad little gaters think. It’s all because Sean Vanaman called out Pewds for his racism and made a legitimate and legal decision about who has rights to republish his company’s IP.

            Something that gets my goat: even if you’re not an “SJW” and you don’t like “SJWs”, it’s still a complete inversion of truth to say that someone who did a “good” thing actually did a “bad” thing. I remember when the far right were just ok with being evil, now they pretend they’re the good guys and say that calling someone out for racism is “bad politics”. Nope, it’s just being a decent half-way respectable human being.

            Aaaaanyway, I think this merger is great. I’m looking forward to a Valve game for the first time in ages, and I can see it bringing about thoughtful and creatively rich titles in the future. They’re a really talented team with a great back catalogue between them. I trust the creative integrity of the Campo Santo team to not be entering into this blindly or to be giving up their ideals.

          • Premium User Badge

            Mikemcn says:

            Sounds good to me! Let campo santo’s “bad politics” take over then!

    • Umama says:

      Missed the username at first then thought “oh this must be SaintAn”. Don’t ever change!

  2. DeepSleeper says:

    I guess we can push the Valley of Gods release date back another decade.

  3. LearningToSmile says:

    oh no

  4. keysersoze says:

    I have listened to Idle Thumbs and all of Jake, Sean, and Chris’ stuff for years now. Not sure what this means for their work and I hope it doesn’t slow down their releases but they’re one of those groups of podcasters I almost feel like I know I’ve listened to them for so long. So I’m just happy they get to work at Willy Wonka’s Money Factory and take cool free vacations. Plus it has probably been a personal dream of theirs to work for Valve so good on them.

    • Undermind_Mike says:

      Likewise, those guys were my favourite podcast for many years (they even read out a couple of my emails), and it only slowly dawned on me what big deals they were in the games business. My worst self is envious of how much money they probably all just made, but good for them, they were basically always cool guys. I hope the dire predictions of the Valve-haters on here don’t come true.

    • Urthman says:

      I expect there is about a 60% chance that Jake Rodkin will finally get Half-Life 3 made just by never, ever shutting up about it in the nicest and most hilarious way possible. (The other 40% involves him wheeling his desk over to the TF2 team.)

  5. Sirius1 says:

    Ah crap. There goes any hope of a GOG (or anywhere other than steam) release for this.

    • Quickly says:

      I wonder if this also spells the removal of their Firewatch release on GOG.

      • gwathdring says:

        That seems exceptionally unlikely. A lot of games are on multiple digital platforms. Valve isn’t saintly, but that doesn’t really benefit them by their more holistic calculus. Restrictions like their famous change to restrict off-service DLC sales resulting in conflicts with Origin are another matter entirely.

        Absolutely expect Valley of the Gods to be a Steam exclusive, though. And that’s a shame. :(

    • Urthman says:

      Is this going to be the first Valve game that’s not made in the Source Engine? I doubt that Campo Santo is going to ditch all the work they’ve done so far in Unity.

  6. caff says:

    Aha so this is how Valve make games now!

    But in all seriousness, Firewatch was amazing and surely they will go bigger and better now. Good luck to them.

    • Baines says:

      Valve has made games like this for a while.

      This is how Valve got Portal, by hiring the devs of Narbacular Drop.

      This is what Valve did with Turtle Rock. Turtle Rock came up with the idea for Left 4 Dead, presented it to Valve, and Valve bought the studio and and renamed it into Valve South. Mind, Turtle Rock soon found that they didn’t like working with Valve, and the two groups agreed to separate again after L4D’s release.

      Valve bought Star Filled, really only a two-man studio, but parted ways with them less than a year later without even seeing a game released.

  7. April March says:

    What strange news. Valve will publish games now? I guess I should expect EA to announce text adventures next…

    • Premium User Badge

      Big Dunc says:

      Only if they can find a way to have loot boxes in them.

      • spacein_vader says:

        Easily done. The default font will be comic sans. If you want it in something readable like ariel or Helvetica you’ll have to chance your arm with the loot boxes (but it’s fine as it’s only cosmetics.)

        Also all nouns will be stripped out and held back for the first DLC. The 2nd DLC will add punctuation.

        I’ve just given them ideas haven’t they?

  8. Premium User Badge

    keithzg says:

    The In The Valley Of Gods tag link returns on this article, so I remain unclear what it actually is as a game!

  9. Retroblique says:

    Okay, I get it. Many people are averse to change. And a progressive indie studio such as Campo Santo (“hurray!”) joining a big, evil, corporate monolith such as Valve (“boo!”, “hiss!”) is going to get people jumping on all sorts of bandwagons. But how about we assume, just for one minute, that what’s happening is happening because a bunch of people who are a) very talented game developers, and b) have more collective experience in the industry than everyone in this comment section put together, held a series of very long and frank discussions about this acquisition and that both parties believe they’re doing it with the best of intentions?

    The way this is all playing out on social media, you’d think this was some Looney Tunes cartoon from the 1930s where the big bad wolf tricked the three little pigs into signing building permits for their three little houses, and now they’re sitting tied up in a bag while he slices onions and carrots over a cauldron of boiling water.

    I get it, people have issues with Valve. Actually, I don’t quite get ALL of them, but I know people are disappointed with them for turning Steam into the iTunes of video games, for apparently turning their back on PC gamers who would rather have more HL/Portal/L4D than Counter-Strike and Dota, for being all secretive and hands off with the press, for their dalliances with Steam boxes, SteamOS, and VR, for whatever the hell Greenlight was, etc. There’s a lot of reasons to be raising one’s eyebrow at Valve right now, but… Valve once made great games. Jeez: Half-Life 2, Portal 2, Team Fortress 2, and Left 4 Dead! If Valve want to get back to game development and make that a priority, I can’t think of a better starting point than acquiring the talents of an indie studio such as Campo Santo.

    I see a lot of people mocking Valve for “no longer knowing how to make games” and “resorting to hiring people who do”. You know, I’m sorry to break this to some of you, but that’s kinda how video game development works. If a development studio need to produce a particular thing, THEY HIRE THE PEOPLE WHO KNOW HOW TO MAKE THAT THING. If a development studio want to take themselves in a particular direction, THEY HIRE THE PEOPLE WHO KNOW HOW TO GET THERE. It seems as if people expect Gabe to stick his head around the door of the accounting department at Valve and announce to Bob, Sue, and Rita that they need to put down those spreadsheets and fire up the Source SDK, because it’s now game-making time.

    But it’s true, Valve DOES need to restructure as a games developer. In case you hadn’t noticed, almost all the people who were responsible for the likes of Half-Life 2, Portal 2, L4D, etc. within a wide variety of capacities no longer work for Valve. They haven’t had huge teams of designers, artists, and writers all sitting around twiddling their thumbs since Portal 2 shipped in 2011. They all eventually drifted away and can now be found at places like Arkane, Bioware, Crystal Dynamics, Eidos Montreal, Naughty Dog, Insomniac, etc.

    No, Valve need to rebuild. Getting Richard Garfield on board was smart. Getting Campo Santo on board is smarter. There will be more studio acquisitions to come and other personnel to fill in the gaps. I really can’t see this as anything other than an exciting opportunity for many talented people and there’s a very, very good chance it’s going to lead to some exciting, innovative games. Let’s find a teensy bit of positivity here, folks, and encourage Valve and the folks from Campo Santo. If you’ve already decided this is all doomed to failure then maybe you need to reexamine your own attitude to video games and the gaming industry. Healthy scepticism is fine, but I’m seeing a lot of borderline hostility in some quarters. Let’s just all take a deep breath. This is going to be okay.

    • Premium User Badge

      Earl-Grey says:

      You should get out more.

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        Ninja Dodo says:

        That’s a pretty dumb way to respond to one of the few thoughtful and positive comments in this thread, Earl Grey.

        It’s like people are so ground down by the relentless torrent of shit that is internet comments that they don’t know what to do when someone writes something constructive…

      • Nelyeth says:

        I disagree. If anything, he should comment more.

      • Retroblique says:

        You sound like a swell guy! Let’s meet up for coffee. I’ll show you all the pictures I took at the local botanical gardens and Colonial Williamsburg last week. It’ll be great! Afterwards we can have a stroll around town and talk about the architecture. So glad to finally meet someone who likes to get out and about! Call me.

    • ColonelFlanders says:

      I disagree, Valve does NOT need to restructure as a games developer. All they’ve done in terms of development for the last 10 years is introduce or popularise the shitty and cancerous money-making mechanics that all the AAA games are using these days. No. Fuck more of that. Valve does not need to restructure. It needs to sell Steam to someone who knows what they’re doing, then collapse like the overdone souffle that they are.

    • MrBehemoth says:

      What Retroblique said. All of it. Every word.

    • Baines says:

      The problem with the “more experience” argument is that we have so many stories of devs doing questionable or even “obviously stupid” things that of course come back to bite them.

      People like to think that they are special. They overestimate their own abilities, underestimate others, get caught up in the hoopla, and think things are fine until they’ve already gone terribly south. People, regardless of experience, make bad decisions. (Some with the “right” experience manage to improve their careers while making bad decisions.)

      EA has a terrible track record with the studios that it purchases. Despite that, you can probably find plenty of studios that wish that EA would buy them, and you can find employees that will openly defend and even praise working with EA. They will dismiss all the negative claims of outsiders and members of now shut-down studios, because so far they haven’t seen anything bad happen to themselves personally. (And even there, they’ve probably seen a few bad things, they just don’t find them to be important at the moment.)

      Remember the stories a while back blaming Metacritic for dev studios missing their necessary bonuses? It isn’t like those clauses were hidden in the contracts. The studios knew that those needed bonuses were tied to Metacritic scores when they signed the contracts, but they did it anyway because they assumed (sometimes contrary to their own Metacritic track record) that they’d hit the necessary percentage. To be fair, one studio caught in such a situation did admit that it was a bad contract, but went on to say that they didn’t really have a choice but to sign it anyway. (Sometimes you make bad decisions not just because you don’t know any better, but rather because you don’t see any better options. Mind, that doesn’t mean better options don’t exist, just that you don’t see them.)

      You can skim news stories and find plenty of “obviously” bad decisions. Companies that post absurd sales expectations, and then later say that their multi-million seller games are failures for not meeting them. Devs writing post-mortems that blame everything except themselves for why their mediocre bandwagon game failed. Studios shutting down after a bad deal or a couple of bad games. Etc.

      • Retroblique says:

        I’ve seen a few people comparing the Valve/Campo Santo deal to what Electronic Arts have done to various studios, particularly in the 1990s, but I’m not convinced it’s even close to being the same situation. For Valve it’s always been about the acquisition of talent. For EA it’s always been about acquiring back catalogues, franchises, and driving the studios they acquire to churn out clones of their greatest hits rather than foster that talent and trust them to experiment and innovate with original titles.

        I did playtesting at Lionhead at a time before the Microsoft acquisition, when they still had a lot of Bullfrog DNA and had a very uneasy relationship with EA. Most of the people in the studio were very untrusting of EA and were genuinely concerned for the company’s long term prospects as long as they remained in EA’s shadow. There was a genuine sense that their relationship with EA was one of bully/subordinate.

        But I really don’t see Campo Santo’s relationship with Valve being anywhere close to what happened with Bullfrog, Visceral, and countless other acquisitions that turned to dust. There seems to be a much healthier mutual relationship there which I can’t see as anything but a positive thing.

        • Baines says:

          I’m not saying that Valve is just like EA. I’m just using EA as an example of what people with industry experience, presumably after multiple meetings and discussions, can decide is a beneficial idea. Well, beneficial right up until the wheels come off, at which point they start to acknowledge all the warning signs and problems that they’d previously dismissed or failed to see.

          As for Valve’s own track record, it is a bit too small to determine. Mostly they just hire developers directly rather than purchase studios that will remain semi-autonomous entities.

          Turtle Rock and Star Filled are the only two studios I can think of that were treated that way, and both of those deals fell apart quickly. Turtle Rock hadn’t even finished their first game as Valve South before both sides decided to call the arrangement quits, while Star Filled didn’t release anything at all before both parties decided to pull the plug.

          As for hiring developers directly, from all appearances Valve only gets a little game mileage out of those acquisitions as well. The headhunted hires either develop Valve’s mentalities, or later quietly leave the company to make games elsewhere.

          Maybe Valve has reached a point where it can go a full-on publisher route, but we know that will only happen if enough skilled employees inside Valve decide that they want to do the work of being publishers, which itself is questionable.

    • Axyl says:

      I agree with almost every word you said.

      One minor correction, though. Valve have only *really* made 2 games (or 4 depending on your view point). Half Life 1, 2 and maybe Eps 1&2 as well.

      Literally every other title Valve has released has been a mod they’ve turned into a full commercial product.

      L4D, Portal, CS, DOTA, Team Fortress.. all started as mods and Valve bought the teams and the IPs and the rest is history.

      Valve didn’t make games, they converted mods into games, and were DAMN GOOD at it too, but I do feel the distinction is important although I honestly couldn’t tell you why. It just felt like something to point out. Maybe it’s just me. :)

      Great comment otherwise though. Please post more. :D

      • April March says:

        One minor correction, though. Valve have only *really* made 2 games(…) Literally every other title Valve has released has been a mod they’ve turned into a full commercial product.

        Is that not ‘making’ a game?

    • Vodka, Crisps, Plutonium says:

      >>big, evil, corporate monolith such as Valve…
      Never have the guys behind such brilliant series as Half-Life and… Well, anyway, they never struck me as an evil greedy corporation – by industry’ standards, they’re more akin to a bunch of hippies (with very good expertise in their field, mind) sitting on their exceptionally high-class weed farm.

    • April March says:

      Yeah, I made fun of the situation, but really, this is perfect for Campo Santo. They have a lot of financial backing behind them, and I have this feeling that Valve will literally forget they exist until they’re done with a game and it’s time to release it. Valve could probably take the budget to sustain them entirely from their sugar budget, and their coffee would taste the same.

      The only true concern is that their games might not show up in GOG any more. And only GOG, since stuff like CounterStrike is available on Gamersgate and Nuuvem and whatnot.

    • elendil says:

      I understand what you’re saying. But you know, it’s a long time that Valve need to restructure as a game developer. And so, in 2011 they hired Doug Church (my favourite game developer EVER) to work on an undisclosed project. He left in 2016 with zero game delivered. They hired Clint Hocking to work on an undisclosed project. He left 2 years later with zero game delivered. And so on.

      In the last 6-7 years, Valve “Game developer” has been an enormous black hole devouring talent and not letting it go go out.

      I sincerely hope Valve will return to fund and support talented developers, like the used to do with CS, Portal, L4D. I’m also scared it’s too late and being part of Valve means you’re imprisoned in their weird “anyone does what he likes” rule.

    • Peralph says:

      Bravo, Retroblique. Well said.

  10. DoomBroom says:

    Firewatch and Valley of the Gods in VR! hehehe.

    In any case this is just more indications Valve is ramping up their games biz. Valley of the Gods might not be a VR title, but after that the team will surely dabble in virtual reality. And that is really all I care about. I think it’s super cool there’s a company out there as big as Valve doing stuff I like.

  11. Premium User Badge

    Ninja Dodo says:

    Congrats to Campo Santo!

    Also I like that this evidently means that someone at Valve still cares about character-focused narrative heavy games. (Never mind HL3… imagine the possibilities of Valve + Campo and what else they could come up with)

    • Werthead says:

      “What should these guys work on after that Egyptian thing?”

      “Well, they’re really good at first-person games that are completely linear, but sometimes hide their linearity with semi-open bits which distract you with lots of attention to detail, with a huge focus on story and dialogue and fairly simple but compelling gameplay which make for a tremendously atmospheric, rich title. So maybe we should get them to work on a Valve franchise which is basically a really linear game rich in story and attention to detail?”

      “So you mean…”

      TEAM FORTRESS 3 CONFIRMED.

  12. woodsey says:

    Well, uh, I think this is good news.

    Small indie studio with a great pedigree paired with another small company with an infinite money pool that lets people do what they want.

    (I know it seems absurd to describe Valve as a small company but I’m pretty sure they have less employees than just one of Ubisoft’s sweatshops.)

    • Werthead says:

      Apparently they have 360 employees compared to UbiSoft Montreal’s 3,050. So yes, absolutely.

      I had to go back and look at that again. Valve have 360 employees in total worldwide to develop games, hardeware, VR and run Steam? Wow. That’s half of CD Projekt and only 40 more than Frontier Developments.

      • somnolentsurfer says:

        Yeah, I’m getting increasingly skeptical of that figure. It’s always been apparent that their do-what-you-want structure is not one that lends itself well to providing quality support, but surely just managing the world wide server infrastructure for Steam must take more people than that? Sure, maybe there are 360 people in Bellevue, but I’m pretty certain they have a local team of engineers running the South East Asia Dota servers, people throughout the world looking after the CDN, and probably a support team in India.

  13. Dinger says:

    Hey, thanks for pointing out the Quarterly Review. I hadn’t seen that yet; some of the articles kinda remind me of what the Escapist had in the first year, or RPS in the Orange Box era. You know, back when people took seriously the idea of NGJ.

  14. pepperfez says:

    It’s exciting that Valve is bringing this kind of talent to bear on Team Fortress promo videos!

  15. DatonKallandor says:

    I wonder if they’ll manage to get out just one or two games before the team falls apart and the devs are spread to the wind as is getting-bought-by-Valve tradition.

  16. catscratch says:

    This isn’t a bad thing at all, in my mind.

    Campo Santo are talented writers and developers, of that there is no question.

    They’re also the idiots that DMCAd Pewdiepie, showing the world that their virtue signaling is more important to them than setting extremely dangerous legal precedents.

    Well, they won’t be able to do that under Valve. But what they will be able to do is make more games and have more resources at their disposal. Being a small indie studio in this industry isn’t exactly the best job security in the world. They should have that now, and just as importantly, little crybaby gets its pacifier and won’t be able to make any more stupid legal moves motivated by politics.

    A win-win all around.

    P.S. Stealing an engraved champaigne bottle? Really? Major party foul, bros…

  17. PiiSmith says:

    Lets hope they will continue to make games. Or in other words lets hope the Valve will have another worthwhile release after years of only being a store front.

  18. Uninteresting Curse File Implement says:

    Does that indicate that Valve is starting to change priorities from games with hardcore competitive gameplay and non-existent story to games that are all story and barely existent rudimentary gameplay? Eh, I’ll take it.

  19. Urthman says:

    I just hope Campo Santo doesn’t swallow Valve’s playtester Kool-Aid. There’s no way the process that sanded off every edge from Alyx that could possibly ever irritate a player would allow the creation of a character like Delilah.

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