Rainbow Six Siege prepares for Operation Para Bellum

Si vis pacem, the old adage says, para bellum. No one knows what it means, the original language long since lost to history, but it’s believed to broadly translate to “If you don’t sit down and shut your mouth, I’ll belt you one.” That message of shoving will carry over to the next Rainbow Six Siege update, named Operation Para Bellum, which will add the game’s nineteenth map and two Italian new characters.

Ubi are keeping relatively quiet about new content Para Bellum, the Season 2 update of Siege’s Year 3, for now because they plan to blab all during the livestreamed Pro League Finals that run May 19th and 20th. The two new operators are Italian defenders, the new map is presumably a based around an Italian farmhouse – given that ↑ piece of artwork, obvs.

While Ubisoft don’t have much to say about Para Bellum, leaks a few weeks before this official announcement have more hints. Supposedly one of ’em has a remote-controlled turret and t’other can lay down decoy holograms. This isn’t confirmed but operators do tend to leak long before their announcements these days, and the leaks did know the name Para Bellum.

The accompanying update will also tweak Siege’s gameguts. The promised Pick & Ban system, which will let teams restrict their opponents’ character options like in MOBAs, is coming.

“This feature provides an extra layer of strategy between teams, as each side tries to counter their opponents’ picks during the banning phase,” Ubisoft say. “We also anticipate a thrilling twist at the last moment, when teams swap Operators for the unexpected 6th Pick.”

The previously-discussed dropshotting changes are due in the update too.

10 Comments

Top comments

  1. Monggerel says:

    The common misunderstanding that "Si vis pace, para bellum" translates as "If you want peace, prepare for war", has spread from a mistake made by a single Irish monk named Taoiseach in the 13th century.
    The original language, known also as "Romanic", is now unfortunately lost to us, but a Tyrian esotericist known only as "Hermes Trismegistus" completed a full translation into Greek circa ~1050 AD. That translation, in turn, was also itself destroyed during the conquest of Constantinople (May of 1453).
    Due to these unfortunate historic circumstances, a complete record of the meaning of "Si vis pacem, para bellum" has been lost to us.

    However, none other than Umberto Eco himself chanced to acquire a copy of a certain chronicle, by another 13th century monk, named Melmo, which included a translation of the meaning of the first part, "Si vis pacem".

    This was the text of the partial translation, found in Belbo's chronicle:

    "But I must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing of a pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness. No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally encounter consequences that are extremely painful. Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself, because it is pain, but occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?

    On the other hand, we denounce with righteous indignation and dislike men who are so beguiled and demoralized by the charms of pleasure of the moment, so blinded by desire, that they cannot foresee the pain and trouble that are bound to ensue; and equal blame belongs to those who fail in their duty through weakness of will, which is the same as saying through shrinking from toil and pain. These cases are perfectly simple and easy to distinguish. In a free hour, when our power of choice is untrammeled and when nothing prevents our being able to do what we like best, every pleasure is to be welcomed and every pain avoided. But in certain circumstances and owing to the claims of duty or the obligations of business it will frequently occur that pleasures have to be repudiated and annoyances accepted. The wise man therefore always holds in these matters to this principle of selection: he rejects pleasures to secure other greater pleasures, or else he endures pains to avoid worse.
  1. Aecollins says:

    Si vis pacem, para bellum. Mean “If you want peace, prepare for war.” And it is latin, alot of people know latin.

    • klops says:

      I’m sure she didn’t know that at all.

    • DudeshootMankill says:

      Everyone who didnt know (of which there cant be many left) are just one short googling away from enlightenment too.

      But hey you got to sound moderately intelligent on a gaming news website.

  2. Bowedmaple says:

    “Si vis pacem, Para bellum” Means If you want peace, Prepare for war it’s latin.

  3. EthZee says:

    Huh, I didn’t realise that’s where the name of 9mm Parabellum came from.

  4. Monggerel says:

    The common misunderstanding that “Si vis pace, para bellum” translates as “If you want peace, prepare for war”, has spread from a mistake made by a single Irish monk named Taoiseach in the 13th century.
    The original language, known also as “Romanic”, is now unfortunately lost to us, but a Tyrian esotericist known only as “Hermes Trismegistus” completed a full translation into Greek circa ~1050 AD. That translation, in turn, was also itself destroyed during the conquest of Constantinople (May of 1453).
    Due to these unfortunate historic circumstances, a complete record of the meaning of “Si vis pacem, para bellum” has been lost to us.

    However, none other than Umberto Eco himself chanced to acquire a copy of a certain chronicle, by another 13th century monk, named Melmo, which included a translation of the meaning of the first part, “Si vis pacem”.

    This was the text of the partial translation, found in Belbo’s chronicle:

    But I must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing of a pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness. No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally encounter consequences that are extremely painful. Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself, because it is pain, but occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?

    On the other hand, we denounce with righteous indignation and dislike men who are so beguiled and demoralized by the charms of pleasure of the moment, so blinded by desire, that they cannot foresee the pain and trouble that are bound to ensue; and equal blame belongs to those who fail in their duty through weakness of will, which is the same as saying through shrinking from toil and pain. These cases are perfectly simple and easy to distinguish. In a free hour, when our power of choice is untrammeled and when nothing prevents our being able to do what we like best, every pleasure is to be welcomed and every pain avoided. But in certain circumstances and owing to the claims of duty or the obligations of business it will frequently occur that pleasures have to be repudiated and annoyances accepted. The wise man therefore always holds in these matters to this principle of selection: he rejects pleasures to secure other greater pleasures, or else he endures pains to avoid worse.

  5. DEspresso says:

    Another Case for the Universal Translator then.

    [youtube link to youtube.com

Comment on this story

HTML: Allowed code: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>