Fnatic Clutch 2 review: The right-handed version of the (still right-handed) Flick 2

Fnatic Clutch 2 header

After making a strong impression with their pair of Streak mechanical keyboards and lightweight, symmetrical Flick 2 mouse, Fnatic are rounding out their second gen peripheral line-up with the decidedly right-handed gaming mouse, the Clutch 2. Featuring the same Pixart 3360 sensor, Omron switches and more or less all the same specs as its Flick sibling, is this one a better buy? Let’s find out.

Read the rest of this entry »

Artifact feels like Valve’s solution to post-Hearthstone card games

artifact-header

Collectible card games have been around for decades, but they’ve really been running hot ever since Blizzard unleashed Hearthstone four years ago. Since then, we’ve seen Shadowverse, Gwent, The Elder Scrolls: Legends, Duelyst, Faeria – there are a lot of these things, if you haven’t heard. They all put their own spin on rectangles with numbers on ’em, but they also universally take cues from Hearthstone and, just as often, each other, and as a result they regularly run into similar problems, the biggest two being how to balance a competitive system and how to price card packs fairly.

Artifact, Valve’s upcoming Dota-inspired card game, is definitely using some pages from the same books, but it’s also doing enough things differently that it has the potential to solve a lot of those problems. Read the rest of this entry »

Review In Progress: Pillars Of Eternity II: Deadfire

Pillars Of Eternity II is seemingly infinity hours long. Despite a week of playing, I’m still going, so here’s my in-depth thoughts about the game excluding the impact of its ending. I will update later.

What a lot Pillars Of Eternity II feels like it has to do. It needs to be a completely new dozens-of-hours-long RPG, while it also needs to be a sequel to 2015’s stunning first outing, while it needs to feel like it’s evolved from then, while it needs to feel like it’s faithful, while it… In many ways, it succeeds despite being tugged in all these directions. And in others, it feels wearily stretched from the process. Read the rest of this entry »

Being a fan of esports’ pioneering women is complicated

Crowd

It’s two o’clock in the morning and I’m watching the Overwatch League stadium erupt for Kim “Geguri” Se-yeon.

As the camera pans down the line-up of her team, the Shanghai Dragons, it’s always her that gets the loudest cheer, and by a wide margin. Because she’s a fantastic off-tank and because she’s one of the new additions that have so greatly improved the (admittedly still winless) Dragons. But also, unavoidably, because she’s the first and only woman in the League. Read the rest of this entry »

Steam Charts: surviving the Frostpunk bots of Britannia

Hullo! John is preoccupied with wizards right now, so I’m taking over for the rundown of last week’s top ten on Steam. It was an interesting week, bringing back some welcome old games and slamming in some shiny new ones. Largely, it’s all about robots and survival.

Read the rest of this entry »

Jeff Freezos: a diary of Frostpunk doom, part 1

frostpunk-diary

The fate of humanity, or at least a slim and freezing remainder of it, rests upon the bewildered shoulders of someone who can’t even keep a basil plant alive for more than 24 hours. Frostpunk does not forgive. Frostpunk does not have mercy. Frostpunk will kill everyone. Unless I can stop it.
Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

papers2

Sundays are (sometimes) for relishing the very un-Sunday-ish feeling of having a whole extra day off work ahead of you, and regretting not ordering God of War early enough for it to arrive in time.

Jennifer Allen’s article on Eurogamer about establishing rules for a gaming friendship is great, and I’d love to know how many people relate to it. Me and my childhood gaming friend never set up any rules, though maybe if we had he wouldn’t have grabbed the keyboard away from me in the middle of a velociraptor fight in Jurrassic Park: Danger Zone when I refused to stop spamming the tail-whip button.

Read the rest of this entry »

Free games of the week

free-games-of-the-week12

Organise your life by talking to your friend, organise a postal warehouse by filtering out illegal packages, and solve puzzles in a creepy library to stay alive. Save all of humanity from giant bugs by controlling a giant mech with your estranged sister, or fight monsters by firing projectiles at them in a story-driven Breakout-inspired game. All of this is waiting for you in this week’s free games. Read the rest of this entry »

What are we all playing this weekend?

Hullo there! Happy May Day Bank Holiday Weekend, gang. Or to translate that into International English: we won’t be here on Monday cos it’s a holiday. I always remember this as a day to visit the seaside, splashing about and eating half a pint of vinegar-soaked cockles. Perhaps your plans are more glamorous, or involve more video games.

What are you playing this weekend? Here’s what we’re clicking on!

Read the rest of this entry »

May the 4th be with you – the best Star Wars games

best-star-wars-games-1

Consider this an apology. We often make fun of the Star Wars franchise here at Rock Paper Shotgun, with posts that belittle and ignore its impact on culture, especially videogames. With something as ubiquitous and admired, it’s easy to be dismissive  of this star-hopping saga. But it is undeniably an adventure that has made millions of people widen their eyes in interstellar wonder. With that in mind, we have collected the best Star Wars games in one handy list. May the 4th be with you. Read the rest of this entry »

The true meaning of BattleTech is interstellar giant robot amputation Pokemon

battletech-salvage

Some might say that BattleTech‘s meta-game is the strategy layer – all that base-building, mech-fixing’n’fitting, pilot management and parts-shopping required to ultimately create an unstoppable army of heavy metal death. Those people are dead wrong. The overarching goal of BattleTech, the true purpose of its turn-based fights and base management alike, is that you gotta catch ’em all.

By which I mean, you gotta kneecap ’em all.
Read the rest of this entry »

Fnatic Flick 2 review: DPI on the X and Y

Fnatic Flick 2

If two new mechanical keyboards weren’t enough for you, esports giants Fnatic have also released a new pair of mice to go with them, the first of which I’ve got here: the Flick 2. As its name implies, this is the second generation of Fnatic’s Flick mouse, now with a newer, grippier grip, a more refined symmetrical shape and a better, more accurate sensor. Read the rest of this entry »

Utomik promises ‘Netflix for games’ but its library is an underwhelming collection of oldies

utomik-1

Utomik! Sounds like a stiff drink, but no. Utomik is a subscription-based games service that launched yesterday, angling to be ‘Netflix for games’ (sound familiar?) It’s currently offering a library of approximately 750 games for either $7 or $10 per month, depending on whether you want to share the account with your little sister or not. I signed up and took a stroll through its library, fingering a few tomes here and there. And while it was fast and performed well, there wasn’t a lot I wanted to play. It’s less Netflix for games and more “Spotify for older games you already own or don’t want”. Read the rest of this entry »

Best PC gaming deals of the week

StarWarsDarkForces

If you are reading this, odds are fairly good that you are both an internet user and alive. That winning combination will also mean that it’s probably been almost impossible not to have run into some form of notification that today is, in fact, Star Wars day. Because May the 4th, you know. If nothing else, it’s given me an excuse to use a shot from Dark Forces as the header to this week’s roundup of the best PC gaming deals. Come for the whimsy, stay for the deals.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Flare Path: Heavily Engauged

How soon is too soon when it comes to developing games based on historical tragedies? I’m really not sure but I guess the fact that Kursk makes me uncomfortable while Titanic: Honor and Glory doesn’t, means I do believe video games have the power to enflame wounds and compound grief if they arrive too early and show too little respect for the truth.

Polish devs Jujubee claim that Kursk will be the “first fully fledged adventure-documentary game in history”. It’s a bold statement and a questionable one when set beside others made by the K-141-obsessed Katowicians… Read the rest of this entry »

Podcast: Feeling the cold with Frostpunk

podcast-frostpunk-1

Bit nippy in here, isn’t it? Let’s throw another game on the fire and warm ourselves with some electro-soup. Yes, it’s the RPS podcast, the Electronic Wireless Show, and this week we’re talking about freezing cold city-builder Frostpunk. Katharine lost a third of her people to cold when she forgot to turn the heat on, while Brendan dug up his society’s dead because he “needed the space”. Matt is horrified by these tales, but soon proves he’s just as horrible when he completes our Frostpunk-themed ethical dilemma quiz. Read the rest of this entry »

Spawn Point: a guide to collectible card games

spawn-point-ccgs-1b

Welcome to Spawn Point, where we take something wonderful from the world of gaming and explain what it is, why it’s worth your time and how to get involved. This time: collectible card games (or at least, the videogame kind).

Hello, I would like to collect some cards please. Of course, friend. We have a wide variety of fantasy themed cards, ranging from hostile dragon to raving ghoul to –

Hang on, what are these numbers? Oh, ignore those, they’re nothing to worry about. Look at this wizard! Read the rest of this entry »

AMD Ryzen 5 2600 / 2600X review: The Intel Core-i5 Coffee Lake killers

AMD Ryzen 5 2600X

The Ryzen 5 2600 and 2600X are AMD’s new mid-range desktop CPUs, and they’re primed and ready to take on Intel’s 8th Gen Core i5 Coffee Lake processors. With six cores and 12 threads apiece, plus respective base clock speeds of 3.4GHz and 3.6GHz, they may not look like huge improvements over their 1600 and 1600X Ryzen predecessors on paper, but this time it’s what’s inside that counts, as both chips now have a faster, more efficient architecture behind them and better tech to help them reach their improved max boost clock speeds of 3.9GHz and 4.2GHz more regularly.

Today, I’ll be looking at both the Ryzen 5 2600 and its X-rated sibling together in one big mid-range face off, pitching them against each other and seeing how they compare to help you decide which one is worth buying.

Read the rest of this entry »

What I learnt from Dota 2 pro Purge about the game and those who play it

purgeworkshopheader

Kevin ‘Purge’ Godec is an ex-pro Dota 2 player turned analyst, commentator and coach, and I recently went to an event in London where me and a few other journos (*puts on Red Bull Esports voice*): “trained under Purge”.

We played a couple of games against people who were far better than us, then listened to a man with near comprehensive knowledge of a stupidly complicated game brutally highlight our every misstep in front of a large crowd of people.

I loved it, though not because of the valuable advice. I loved it because it felt like stepping back into a world that I thought I’d left behind, and realising that I’m eager to get back to exploring. I also hated it, because it brought me face to face with some of that world’s unpleasant inhabitants in a way that I never have been before.

Read the rest of this entry »

Has The Signal from Tölva been improved by its updates?

tolva

Update Night is a fortnightly column in which Rich McCormick revisits games to find out whether they’ve been changed for better or worse.

It’s grim up north, and only partly because I’m being shot at by a gang of robots.

The Polar Regions — a new and free campaign for first-person shooter The Signal from Tölva — is so named because it’s set in a chilly and inhospitable wasteland, home to rusting hulks of machinery, non-Euclidean bunkers, as well as those aforementioned robots. They’re not all trying to shoot at me, to be fair, but enough of them are that’s causing me problems. I’m back on the quietly spooky planet of Tölva for a second adventure, although it’s not so much “back” — the Polar Regions campaign technically takes place six months before the events of the main game, and sets up the original Tölva storyline with some light investigation work. Read the rest of this entry »