Logitech Buys Saitek’s Sim Controller Business For $13m

Saitek, the makers of a great many switch-covered peripherals for controlling planes, trains, and and automobiles, have been sold for $13 million (about £10 million) in cash. Saitek was owned by fellow controller company Mad Catz, who bought them in 2007, but now they march under the banner of peripheral giants Logitech. (I recommend Saitek’s Pro Flight™ Rudder Pedals for marching simulators – the differential braking really sells the footfeel.)

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Hardware Hotness: AMD’s Zen CPU, Gaming Monitors, More VR And The Silliest Laptop Ever

What with the sober-suited Euro foil to CES that is the IFA consumer electronics show, Intel’s IDF shindig, a new console or two from Sony and new version of the smartphone that dare not speak its name, it’s been a busy week or two in tech. But has there been any joy for the good old PC? You know, that dessicated old thing that just so happens to be by far the best gaming platform, period? There’s certainly been some startling new PC-gaming kit, including surely the most preposterous gaming laptop ever. But also some newness of genuine relevance, including an update on AMD’s new Zen CPU, some very interesting screens, plus a few further potentially PC-related oddities that are hard to gauge for now.

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Here’s How Mass Effect Andromeda Will Look In 4k

Sony just held a somewhat dry press conference about the release of their new PlayStation 4 models (a skinny one called the PS4 slim and a fat one called the PS4 Pro, if you’re interested) but the new Mass Effect Andromeda [official site] was also among the games they showed off. The footage is marked as a ‘tech demo’ to boast about the benefits of 4k, promising “crisper visuals, high dynamic range lighting… and some of the most lifelike characters we’ve ever created.” It’s also incredibly boring.

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Quark VR Working On Wireless HTC Vive Prototype

The level of immersion you get from VR is impressive, to be sure, but nothing mars that experience quite like tripping over a cord and conking your head on the coffee table. Quark VR are hoping to save the day with a wireless HTC Vive prototype. Well, nearly wireless. It’s a work in progress.

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AMD’s New Radeon RX 480: Graphics Greatness You Can Actually Afford?

As promised, the 2016 GPUgasm continues and not a moment too soon we come to AMD’s new pixel pumper, the Radeon RX 480, otherwise known as Polaris. With Nvidia’s new graphics chipsets delivering excellent performance but at punitive pricing, the narrative I’m unashamedly desperate to deliver involves AMD to the rescue with something very nearly as good, just for a fraction of the cost. With the new RX 480 clocking in at around £200 / $200, the money part of the package looks promising. But what about the performance? Forget the benchmarks, let’s give the new RX 480 a good old grope.

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Playerkind Divided – How’s Deus Ex Running For You?


Just as night follows day, just as pudding follows main course, just as Westlife follows Boyzone, so too is Steam flooded with negative reviews following the release of a highly-anticipated new game. This time it’s Deus Ex: Mankind Divided [official site], which was released yesterday to a mostly good critical response, but a cooler reception from PC players. Those who pointed their mecha-thumbs downwards are divided between complaints about performance, and being very upset about the inclusion of singleplayer microtransactions.

I did a quick poll of Team RPS to see how well this sucker is running on our many and various systems and, yeah, it seems like it’s not exactly Captain Smooth From Smooth Town.
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ZeniMax Vs. Oculus: Palmer Luckey Didn’t Develop Rift

I am sorry to bring you an update on ZeniMax’s lawsuit against Oculus, a dispute over how much ZeniMax and then-id Software technowizard John Carmack contributed to the Rift’s development. I’m sorry because courtroom drama is so dry. I’d much rather tell you about how Jessica Fletcher, Phryne Fisher, or equivalent amateur sleuth uncovered evidence, how they charmed their way into a high-society dinner, pumped a suspect for details with grace, then cracked their safe with a bobby pin.

No, instead all I can tell you is ZeniMax lawyers claim that the Rift only became the technological wonder we know today thanks to work by Carmack and other ZeniMax employees, not solely by Oculus founder Palmer Luckey. Heck, they say Luckey “lacked the training, expertise, resources or know-how to create commercially viable VR technology, his computer programming skills were rudimentary, and he relied on ZeniMax’s computer program code and games to demonstrate the prototype Rift.” Oof.

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