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Eurogamer Retrospective: The Dig

The really rather special LucasArts adventure, The Dig, had me getting my retro hat and trousers on for Eurogamer. It begins,

Seeing the 15 to 20 year-old point-and-click adventures appearing in Steam's top sellers warms my heart. There is still an audience for these games, and they don't need them to be in 3D with volumetric physics and dynamic downloadable content. Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis has, unsurprisingly, sold the most so far, but for me the game I was drawn to uncover from the archives was The Dig. Not because I have fond memories of it - I had almost no memories at all. But because when The Dig was released in 1995, it carried the weight of six years of expensive, over-hyped development around its neck, and was played under a cloud of preconceptions and prejudice.

I feel that I should restate where I write in the piece that I discuss events throughout the fifteen year old game, including the ending. People seem to be missing this, and then getting cross. It's not a game that would have been interesting to write about if not discussing its entirety. So don't read page 3 if you're about to play the game. Or read it anyway and yell at me.

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John Walker

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Once one of the original co-founders of Rock Paper Shotgun, they killed me out of jealousy. I now run buried-treasure.org

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