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  1. #1
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    iRacing beginner's guide


    Rookie's Guide To IRacing


    INTRODUCTION
    There are few greater thrills than wheel-to-wheel combat with another driver who I can trust not to do anything stupid. Nothing else can work up a sweat quite as much as harassing or being harassed by another driver for 45 gut-wrenching minutes, each of you millimetres from doom as your wheels almost touch and dicing with a car that may handle wonderfully at the start of the race but may not be fit for battle later on with worn out tyres and a similarly worn out driver. If you're reading this, there's a good chance that you are looking for that, and have decided that racing online is the way to go.



    Likely you will also have gone out and looked for such a thing and found the unfortunately common combination of terrible netcode seeing cars bounce around the track on servers run from people's bedrooms, idiots running around the track in the wrong direction (fun against AI, we all enjoy that once in a while but online it's just rude), poor racecraft, people punting you off the track with no consideration, huge gaps in skill between the cars at the front and those at the back, and typically about 10% of the field finishing, all this even assuming you can find a race at a track you like in a car you like. The problems are horrendous, due to a mix of the sim racing community being small and spread rather thinly, gamers invading these sims and behaving badly because it's only a game, and poor infrastructure choices by the devs of many of these sims, combined with a fractious sim racing community that has a strong resemblance at times to the 'People's Front Of Judea' scene in Life Of Brian (Splitters!!!!!).



    So, public racing is horrible. This is an accepted fact of sim racing life. Once in a while you'll get lucky and have a good fight, but generally you won't. This gets worse the further towards the arcade end of things you get, as player behaviour starts to become pretty unpleasant. More hardcore sims do tend to attract a better standard of behaviour, but of course numbers are thinner.

    So, with public racing ruled out, that leaves structured racing as the only way to get a good race. From that we have two options, one of which is iRacing which we will discuss in due course, and the other is league racing, which I will briefly introduce as you may find that it's a better option for you (and cheaper).


    A BRIEF LOOK AT LEAGUE RACING IN OTHER SIMS
    So, league racing will get you clean respectful racing, solving the idiot-based issues public racing faces. Often the servers are professionally hosted, reducing issues around netcode/lag (note that if you're in the UK racing someone in Australia, no matter what you do you're going to have lag, and in cars doing 200mph a 100ms ping is going to kill you). The tricky bit of course is finding a league that runs what you want when you want it, and once you're there there is also the issue of skill levels. Likely the regulars will be much faster than you, being a moving chicane is no fun. Additionally, getting on a server with said regulars to practice is often an exercise in futility simply due to numbers, reducing your opportunity to learn from them. However, if you have a league running what you want, with skill levels close to your own (no way to find out short of running there a few weeks) you're good to go. I recommend RFactor 2 for league racing because it is quite simply the best sim out there right now.

    So the TLDR summary of league racing:
    - Good clean racing
    - Please do it in RFactor 2, it's the best out there
    - Finding what you want in your chosen timezone is tricky
    - Often it's hard to get practice time with other drivers - don't underestimate the importance of this, I've learned tonnes in practice sessions watching fast guys
    - Even if you find a league running what you want when you want, skill gaps may make it less than fun


    IS IT FOR ME?

    Ultimately whether it is for you will be determined by your budget and whether league racing works out for you. If you are unable/unwilling to spend the money, you might prefer league racing. If you have the money and just want pick-up racing then iRacing is for you. Note that budget-conscious users may wish to look at my guide to doing it on the cheap to see if the budget is there for you to do it.

    To succeed in sim racing you'll need to be willing to learn, have the humility to accept that sometimes you are wrong, and be able to cope with not winning in every race. You'll need to be fast and smart, you'll need to be polite and friendly and communicate well. If that doesn't sound like you, if you rage at small injustices, if you need to win, iRacing (and sim-racing in general) may not be for you.

    WHAT'S THE COMMUNITY LIKE?
    The community is generally full of sim-addicts. This is best demonstrated by the sticky threads for Assetto Corsa in the forums in which iRacing staff give tech support for a rival game. Lots of experienced users hang out in the rookie forums offering advice to newbies (please ask questions here or there if you need help), the hardware section of the forum will cost you a fortune in gadget lust, and people share setups, discuss how to make the car faster, driving techniques etc. Use of real names and a fear of banning (and thus losing access to content) generally keeps people fairly honest.

    There is of course a negative side. Forum moderation is odd (stuff slides that is clearly against the rules while some weird things get locked, protested or people banned). You inevitably have that same element of people that existed in the 16-bit wars who insist that the Amiga is better and the Atari ST is the spawn of the devil, where one cannot like two things. You also have, as trjp often alludes to here, the guys who will defend iRacing to the hilt no matter what, because they've spent £1k and they don't want to know if they've screwed up, a mix of cult membership and Stockholm syndrome at times. And of course you have the perennial moaners. Additionally you have the more subtle trolls who will attempt to get a rise out of people to get them banned, effectively using the moderators as a tool of bullying. Tbh though these characters exist everywhere, on all forums, anywhere on the internet. The internet is a toxic place.

    Now all that said, if you go in ranting and raving that the SR system is broken, everyone wrecks, every accident is someone else's fault and iRacing should be changed to be exactly how you think it should be and that you've figured it out after 3 days on the service, expect to be torn a new one. If you go in without prejudices, willing to learn, people are helpful and friendly.


    WHAT DO I NEED?
    You could play it on a laptop with an xbox controller. It can be done, in the same way that you could steer your car with your nose. However, I would not recommend it. A decent wheel and pedals will give you much finer control and feedback from the sim, allowing you to understand better what your car is doing. In its simplest form, steering is much easier when you have a wheel and much harder with a pad because the movement area is so small on the pad, coupled with dead-zone issues.

    I would recommend at least one decent monitor that you can have reasonably close to you. Remembering that your monitor is your window to the world, having a bigger monitor closer to you means that with a realistic FOV you will have a bigger better view of what is going on around you. That realistic FOV matters btw but I'll come back to that later. Triple monitors are wonderful once you upgrade, though you should aim for 3 of the same size and resolution (and even bezel size) as doing it any other way is a massive pain in the balls. Triples mean you can see a lot more of the road and see apexes earlier than you otherwise would, which is extra-useful on tracks like Circuit Of The Americas.



    In terms of wheel and pedals, a Logitech Driving Force GT is an excellent wheel to tide you over the first couple of years of sim racing before you get serious, and indeed plenty of fast serious guys still use it. One can improve the squishy pedals by stuffing a squash ball down the back of the brake pedal. A brand new one can be had for £105 on amazon (ignore it saying it's for Playstation 3, it's not). An honourable mention should also go to the G27. I personally run the DFGT (clamped to a table) and eventually swapped out the pedals for CSR Elite pedals, the load cell brake giving me better feel under braking and improving my consistency in that area as I control braking with how much pressure I apply, not how much movement there is in the pedal (if you've driven a real car you'll understand how important that is).

    33kwxg7.jpg

    What does it cost? (inc "The skint bastard's guide to doing it on the cheap")
    - Right now (as I write this) there is a deal for $49.50 (£30.33) for a year's subscription for new members. Existing members can get the same deal usually on Black Friday. This comes with enough content to get you out of rookie, and a bit for beyond, but you will need to buy content if you want to do the fun stuff.
    - Cars typically cost $11.95 (£7.33) each, note that for multiclass/multimake [eg GT3 with the Porsche, McLaren and BMW] races you only need to own one of the cars to be able to drive there.
    - Tracks typically cost $11.95 (£7.33) each though I think it's a little less for short track ovals (not sure as I can't see the prices for stuff I've already bought)
    - Buying in bulk will save you money. 3-5 items at a time gets you a 10% discount, 6 or more gets you 20% off, once you have 40 items you'll get 25% off anything after that
    - Running in 8 out of 12 weeks of an A or B class * series will get you $8 in credits, while C or D will get you $4, up to a maximum of $10 per season (ie every 3 months)
    - Each year you will get $5 for keeping your account active

    *I'll explain license classes in the "What's all this Safety Code, iRating, Safety Rating bollocks then?" section.

    I would suggest that on the road side your best bet is to look at the forums for the series you want to race in and see what their schedule selection procedure is before deciding what to purchase. The skippy and spec racer for instance operate a rotation system, typically with 2-3 free tracks, 6 from the previous season and 3 new tracks each season. If it helps, tracks which pop up regularly on all series and which will thus offer good value are: Watkins Glen, Mosport, Road America, Road Atlanta, Spa and Sebring. Donington arrived this season and has been popular with Monza arriving likely in October which I expect to be very popular among the faster cars (I can imagine it being quite dull in a skippy or an SRF).


    Your first 24 hours in iRacing
    I'll start off by saying that your goal in rookies is to get out of rookies. It's quarantine for idiots. Rookie is a mix of:
    a. The guys who are too hopeless to ever make it out of rookie
    b. The guys who are happy to stay in rookie, just wrecking whatever they like
    c. The guys who are new and trying to get out of rookie within which there is a mix of:
    - c1. guys who can't drive for shit
    - c2. guys who can drive

    So, only 1 of those 4 groups are people you want anywhere near you in a race. Rookie is a lesson in telling the difference between group c2 and everyone else. Group c2 you might be able to have some fun with, the other groups should be avoided at all costs, even if it means letting them by (do it on a straight though, they won't have the skill to go off their usual line in a corner when passing you, nor will you be able to predict what their usual line would be). It is possible to get out of rookie in about 3-4 races on the road side and 4-5 on the oval side, assuming you go through all your races without crashing or going off track. That said:

    - DON'T RACE UNTIL YOU CAN COMPLETE A RACE DISTANCE IN A PRACTICE SESSION WITHOUT CRASHING.
    Seriously. Otherwise you'll just spend longer in rookie, and nobody wants that. So, get in practice and learn to spot the idiots. Get your line and braking points sussed until you're comfortable with the car, then try all the lines you might have to take when overtaking or being overtaken. Ask someone else in your practice session to practice some side-by-side with you. Watch other cars. (note I'll do a section at a later date on how to use the interface to do these things, in the meantime the official forums are a good source for that kind of information).

    At some point someone will crash into you. Don't get mad. If it's in a race, head to the pits, get your free repair (the first repair in a rookie or D class race is instant, after that they take time and might not fix everything) and finish the race. ALWAYS finish the race. I'll explain why in the SR section but in short, more corners completed and less incidents means a quicker escape from rookie.

    Be prepared to leave your ego at the door, because you will find guys running a good few seconds a lap faster than you. There's no shame in that, you'll get quicker. The iRacing ecosystem (including amazing tools like iSpeed) offers amazing opportunities to get better, and over time you will if you take full advantage, enabling you to practice smarter rather than harder.


    What's all this Safety Code, iRating, Safety Rating and Splits bollocks then?
    So.. iRacing isn't like public server racing where people can run around backwards punting everyone off and live to fight another day. If you drive dangerously, or are abusive on the mic or in text chat, you can be protested, which can result in a warning, coaching, a ban for a period of time or a permanent ban. Cheating is an instant ban by the way. This sounds draconion but it results in a service where the driving is much cleaner and you're not in a room full of COD-playing kids swearing at each other. Oval racing can get a bit fruity at times and generally rookie is policed less than the non-rookie stuff but in general this holds. If someone is driving like an asshole, protest them. If they're being abusive, racist, sexist or otherwise unpleasant in chat please protest them. Doing that helps make the service better. People do generally behave because getting banned is a genuinely bad thing to have happen.

    So, Safety Rating. First, it's not perfect, but it's the best there is. Newbies often feel that it's unfair because in race x they had a crash that wasn't their fault and it cost them SR. In micro it can absolutely be unfair, but in macro, it is usually fair. In short, if you go off track, that's one incident. If you spin that's 2. If you hit another car it's 4 for both of you. Why not just penalise the guy who's fault the crash is? Well go read any forum debates around any crash in F1 (say the Hamilton and Rosberg incident for instance) and you'll see that assigning blame is difficult with humans. iRacing is automated to enable them to scale the service to its present size, where live marshalls would be impractical and expensive, so that is not possible. However, it actually turns out pretty well because everyone has an incentive to avoid crashing. That stupid little number changes people's behaviour and it's brilliant. SR and the protest system are why the racing is generally clean. SR is derived from an average of your corners per incident. More corners, fewer incidents, SR goes up. It's that simple. This is why I encourage you to always finish your races. [this is a part of the reasons most races finish with most of the field still driving, unlike in public races on other sims where typically only 3 guys finish]


    And what about iRating? Well, you start with 1350 iRating. If you finish ahead of guys with higher iRating than you, you gain and they lose. A general rule of thumb is finishing in the top half will gain you iRating. If you are a lower rated driver relative to the guys in the race you may gain iRating for some lower positions, and similarly a high-rated driver will lose rating if he's not in the top 3 places in some cases. You can get an idea of your rating related to other drivers (in races only, not practice) by your car number. Car 1 is the highest iRating, while in a 20-car race, car 20 would be the lowest. Try to finish above your car number! iRating provides an incentive to compete, and an incentive to keep racing as people keep driving even if they're having a bad race, to limit damage to their iRating. This further contributes to most of the field generally finishing the race. Note that you can't see your irating while you're in rookie.

    Your iRating determines which split you get put into, part of the matchmaking system which ensures that you can usually race against guys of similar ability to yourself.

    Which is more important? Irating or safety rating? Well, for me, SR is about enforcing a minimum driving standard and keeping the nutters in rookie. It does this, but beyond that you will typically find driving quality equates more with iRating than SR, as the faster guys are more in control of their cars. That is of course my own personal opinion though, and others will have different opinions. I would suggest once exiting rookie though you should focus on iRating and SR will come. Aim to finish in the top half of every race and you'll eventually find yourself in the top split and facing drivers who are faster and fairer.

    What is a split? Let's say 150 people want to race at 6pm on Saturday. We can't have them all on the same track at once. Instead, it might be 10 races of 15 cars. The highest-ranked guys go in the top split, then the next fastest in the 2nd etc all the way down to the lowest rated guys in the bottom split. Where there are more than 3 splits, the bottom split is where you'll find the scariest drivers, guys who can't stop crashing or are VERY slow or both. If you find yourself down there, beware!

    Promotion And Licenses

    Licenses come in 5 grades, you will have one for road and one for oval. You will start as a rookie at 3.0, able to progress through D, C, B & A licenses.

    Rookies get instantly promoted at 3.0 if they've run 3 or more races. Higher licenses require 4 races or 4 time trials at the highest level available to you, while 3.0 will only go up at the end of the season and 4.0 qualifies you for instant promotion.

    When you go up, your R3.0 will become a D2.0 and you will work up eventually to a D4.0. When you go up from there you'll become a C3.0 and so on (1.0 is dropped off with each promotion). Don't worry too much about that though. You have to get below 1.0 to get demoted, and you can't lose your D license. Once out of rookie, you're free. FOREVER!!!!

    From time to time you'll notice your SR going up or down by something silly like 0.54 compared to the usual 0.14 and you'll see a little question mark by your results. Mousing over that question mark will tell you more, but just in case, I'll explain. When you cross the .0 borderyou gain or lose 0.4. It's a statistical tool to prevent yo-yoing.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by hariseldon; 17-07-2015 at 11:18 AM.

  2. #2
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    What should I drive?
    On oval, obviously you'll start with the street stock and rookie hell. Get out ASAP and head for the Legends for some short track fun. If you're into short track racing I'd suggest the Late Model or Super Late Model as destinations with plenty of races but the SK Modified is a lot of fun (and among the cleanest oval racing you'll find) but there aren't so many races. If it's long track you'll be aiming for Class A or the Indy Car. The Indy Car has the bonus of also being useful on the road side (in fact, for me it's the best oval car and the 2nd best road car behind the Lotus 49).

    On road, you'll start in the Mazda Cup and the Production Car Challenge is a good choice for racing free content. If you want to go open-wheel the path is Skippy -> Star Mazda -> Indy or Lotus 79 -> F1. That said a lot of people enjoy the skippy so much they stay there even with their A license. The F1 is horrible by the way, so I'd suggest topping out at Indy or F1. Note that the Lotus 49 is there, but no-one drives it anymore, it saw huge improvements in participation last season but changes to the car have made it less fun and the community largely fell apart.

    On the closed wheel side you'll probably aim for the GT3 class, in which case the best path is probably MX-5 -> Caddy -> Ruf [Porsche] Cup -> GT3. If you like prototypes, I'd suggest Spec Racer Ford -> Radical (though participation is low this season) -> World Sportscar series with the HPD or the Riley.

    Before purchasing cars and tracks for a series, check that races go official at times that are good for you. You can do this by going to the Series menu on the site and clicking on your chosen series, then selecting the results tab. Look at when races have 8 or more drivers. You can go back to previous weeks to see a pattern over time. While series like the Skip Barber, SRF and GT3 have very very high participation, it should be noted that not all series have races going off every hour (some like the lotus 49 only go off twice a week due to low participation).




    How to get your equipment set up correctly

    First, you should make sure your FOV is correct. This is hugely important. In the sim -> Options -> Graphics you can use the tools provided to calculate your FOV based on the size of your monitor and how far away from you it is situated. If it's too low to be usable, add 10 degrees but no more. It'll seem weird at first but you'll soon notice an improvement in your driving.

    Second. Kill input lag. Ideally you want at least 80 frames per second to achieve this. If this means turning off fancy graphics do it. Thankfully iRacing isn't especially taxing (my box with a GTX760 2GB pushes to 3 1920x1080 monitors with full settings at 120fps). If you can't get good FPS, your first upgrade should be the graphics card. If you're running on a laptop this may be tricky.

    Third. Make sure your wheel is calibrated properly, and your pedals. You may wish to short-calibrate your brake if it's very stiff (ie a load cell).

    Fourth. Make sure your internet doesn't suck. Go wired instead of wireless. Make sure your router is ok. Don't let anyone torrent porn while you're driving.


    Racecraft
    Early on you'll want to win every race and pass everyone. You'll be quoting Senna "if you no longer go for a gap that exists, you are no longer a racing driver". Hold up a bit. That's not always the smart approach. Think more like Prost. Is the guy ahead in control of his car? Is he angry (clue: he'll be ranting on the mic if he is)? Have you had run-ins with him before? Is his car unpainted (always a sign of impending doom)? Are you ACTUALLY faster or just keeping up because you're in his draft? What will you gain from passing? Will fighting with this guy slow you both down and let the guy a few seconds back catch up? If he catches up and it's a 3-car fight will that make things unsafe? Can you use this guy to tow you up to the guy in front of him? Consider these things before deciding that you wish to overtake.

    So, you've decided you're going to pass. Next, you have to decide where. Watch him for a lap or two. Figure out what lines he takes. Is there a corner where his exit is weaker than yours? Great. In that case, next lap, back off a little before you hit that corner, then you can carry your full exit speed into the following straight (otherwise you'll have to brake to avoid hitting him) and you can use superior exit speed plus draft to pass. If that's not on you'll need to find a less safe option, such as faking a pass on the outside of corner x before switching to the inside, or faking moves to end up on the inside at the last of a sequence of corners.

    Remember, smart racers finish higher than dumb ones. Be smart.


    How can I go faster?
    So, this isn't need for speed. You can't buy a nitro upgrade to go faster. Going faster relies on your skill (though some equipment can help too). As this is rookie-focused though I'll work on the assumption that you're driving like a rookie and correct the simplest mistakes while offering some guidance for the future and avoid having you spend a fortune.

    It's all about the exits
    If I had to give one single piece of advice, it would be to exit the corner fast. A fast entry is worthless compared to a fast exit, so don't worry about being the latest braker, focus on being able to exit that corner as quickly as possible. Sometimes you're faster if you brake a little earlier, take the corner a little slower so that you can mash the gas earlier on exit. Slow in, fast out.


    Use the Replays Luke
    So, for starters, the most common rookie problem is driving line. Quite often they don't use the whole of the track. Go into a practice room with some other guys in it. Run your fastest possible lap and watch it back on replay from the blimp or chopper views so you can see how much of the track you are using. Next, do the same with the guy who has the fastest time in the session. Can you see any differences? Now look from his cockpit, get yourself some reference points, get back out there and try it again. This is the single best way to gain time.

    Setups don't matter that much in the lower series
    Absolutely don't bother with setups in the MX-5 or the Skip Barber (in the skippy just go with 22psi on all tyres, 4 SPO and 6 ARB and stay there til you're ready to begin experimenting). Generally, setup doesn't make much impact until you start driving the C cars and above. On the oval side that's a bit different of course, setups are more important, but on road setups are primarily about making the car feel how you want it rather than making it fast. Constantly fiddling with your set can be counter-productive as you'll focus too much on that and not on your driving. It may be advisable in series with more varied setups (like the SRF) to take a set from the forum early in the week and run with that, and adapt your driving to the set, knowing the set is decent.

    iSpeed, you speed, we all speed
    iSpeed (http://www.nessoft.com/ispeed/) is brilliant. You'll want to spend $15 for the full version, and you'll get information like this:



    It looks a bit tricky at first, but once you get your head around it you'll be able to compare yourself with faster guys to see if you're using the correct gear in each corner, compare your line with theirs and see if you're exiting corners at a high enough speed. http://members.iracing.com/jforum/po...t/1838954.page (sorry, iRacing members only) is an excellent guide to getting faster using that telemetry data.




    Any more?
    I'll add more to this over time as I think of things to add. I'm intending to have this evolve over time, and I plan to update the content over time.
    Last edited by hariseldon; 17-09-2014 at 05:14 PM.

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    Reserved Post

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    So this is at this point very much a first draft, but I figured I'd get something out there or I'll procrastinate. I'll add some stuff shortly about promotions, some wreck avoidance tips etc but I figure this is a decent start.

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    Wow, you've put an insane amount of effort into this post!
    All good stuff, will hopefully help some people new to iRacing or maybe even encourage them to give it a go.

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    Putting aside all the other stuff we've clashed-heads about - there's some fantastic points in here, it's illustrated really well, I think you sell the game - even to me ;0

    Can I suggest it's a WALL OF TEXT to read tho - I'd precis and restructure it a bit - I'd also remove the rF2 and other stuff to another thread entirely simply to make it more approachable - in fact we need an rF2 or online league thread perhaps.

    I'd split it into stuff you need to know before you play , stuff to do as a rookie" (how to get SR and Licences), stuff to do once you get a proper licence" (Cars/Tracks to buy) and stuff to do once you're competing.

    Just my 10p

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    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Prolar Bear's Avatar
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    Very well written. Clearly there's a lot of work and passion behind a post like this one. I do agree that it needs a slight trimming though, but yeah, kudos.

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    I'd also maybe take the 'wheel' stuff out - that applies to every racing game as much as it does iRacing tbh

    I think we need a whole thread on control methods and what's worth doing - I'll happily write the "Yes, you can pad it" bit - we got any mouse or keyboard maniacs in here??

    Note: iRacing isn't the best game to pad but that's more down to really limited options for pads in-game rather than the game itself which is as "paddable" as any racer I've played.

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    I will not be removing the wheel stuff as I am aiming to ensure new users have an optimal experience. I will however look at reducing the wall of text though the limited formatting options and limit of 4 images and 1 video per post are hindering me somewhat.

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    Awesome Guide!!

    Quote Originally Posted by hariseldon View Post
    <snip>
    Extremely helpful guide. I have my 3 monitors coming on Friday. After that I'll be saving up for the Thrustmaster T300rs wheel and pedals. Once I get the wheel and pedals I'll definitely be giving iRacing a go. It sounds absolutely brilliant and can't wait to try my hand. Thanks again!
    Last edited by Grizzly; 02-02-2015 at 11:37 AM.

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    Seems iRacing released on Steam 2 days ago, didn't notice it at all until logging into iRacing today.

    A rather hefty £29.99 with six months membership that autorenews every 6 months at £39.99, comes with the base content you regularly get. I'm sure I got a years subscription for around £50 not that long ago. That seems a tad high, especially considering they offer discounted memberships very regularly on their website.
    The steam price does seem to match their pricing model on their website without any discounts though.

    No idea how it integrates with steam as I already have a subscription.

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    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Faldrath's Avatar
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    Oof, yeah, I was mildy hopeful that it would be more advantageous for people from "lower markets" such as Brazil, but no dice (other than paying in my currency). Ah well.
    Do you enjoy pretending to drive really fast (and even not so fast) cars? Join us at the RPS Racing Forum!

    Do you enjoy killing lots and lots of monsters really fast (and even not so fast)? Join us at the RPS Path of Exile guild!

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    You can get a year's account for $49, provided you buy in November, for their Black Friday deal. Oviously Thanks Giving is an American holiday, but I think their offer is global.

    I've heard lots of complaints about how the unwashed masses will come in from Steam and smash up races. This confuses me, as iRacing's number one selling point is the SR and license gating system. I don't care if Catpain Powreslide comes in from Steam and throws his Mazda into the bushes at every corner, because he's not going to be in the same race as me.

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    That's not always the smart approach. Think more like Prost.
    In hindsight, after this incident that line is terrible :P

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    I've been into iRacing for about 4 months now, racing several times a week and I can't remember the last time I was in a race with an idiot or wrecker. Not everybody is fast or technically perfect but at least they all want to race. And if enough people want to race at once, the split system keeps people of similar skills together. I've never known online racing of this consistent quality before. I rarely shine but when things come together, the feeling of achievement is phenomenal. I came from 16th through to 4th at Road Atlanta tonight in a close, clean race and had an absolute hoot.

  17. #17
    Moderator Grizzly's Avatar
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    Must say, I have been looking into iRacing, but currently I have two problems: Lack of a consistent quality internet connection, and a lack of time/money.

    Not that I can't afford iRacing, it's just that it's an investment that requires me to sink a lot of time into it, and my time has been rather random. So the question is once again that I don't doubt that iRacing is good - everyone here told me that it is. Even TRJP likes it a little IIRC... But the question is whether it's good enough.

    There's also Race2Play and league racing out there, after all.
    Last edited by Grizzly; 19-01-2015 at 08:40 AM.

  18. #18
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Prolar Bear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly View Post
    Must say, I have been looking into iRacing, but currently I have two problems: Lack of a consistent quality internet connection, and a lack of time/money.

    Not that I can't afford iRacing, it's just that it's an investment that requires me to sink a lot of time into it, and my time has been rather random. So the question is once again that I don't doubt that iRacing is good - everyone here told me that it is. Even TRJP likes it a little IIRC... But the question is whether it's good enough.

    There's also Race2Play and league racing out there, after all.
    Ask yourself: do you have the time and money to participate in a motorsport career?

    That should be an easy way to decide.
    Do you enjoy failing to race cars wot go fast? Then join us at the Racing Subforum!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prolar Bear View Post
    Ask yourself: do you have the time and money to participate in a motorsport career?

    That should be an easy way to decide.
    Eh, it's not quite that drastic. The cost has been covered time and time again so i'm not going to go into it. As for time commitments, if you can do around an hour in open practice to learn the track you can be reasonably competitive in middle splits. Most races last around 30 mins (Dependent on the series).

    Leagues are a good option and are most certainly fun. But if I have the impulse to just jump into an online race at a random time i'm restricted to public lobbys in other sims and the quality of driving there is way below that of most people at iRacing, where races are run every 1 - 2 hours.

  20. #20
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    I wouldn't worry too much about your internet connection unless it's absolutely diabolical. Mine is about 0.9Mb up and 0.2 Mb down and I never have any problems. Being based on the GPL networking codebase (which ran well when 56K modems were high-tech) obviously helps here.

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