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  1. #1
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus squirrel's Avatar
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    The Bus Sim Set-up Is Very Cool~

    You mates have any idea about this set up? Where can I buy one? What's the price of such a set up?


    This is definitely not the usual racing wheel and pedal you would usually come across. Look at the size of that wheel, it's quite a typical one for a heavy vehicle. Man that's cool.

    I've shopped around many game hardware stores both over here and in Hong Kong, but no luck. All they are selling are small wheels for simulating racers.

    Can you mates recommend some good setup for simulating driving heavy vehicle?

  2. #2
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    Call/Email a company that issues Commercial Drivers Licenses, or contact the Certification/Training staffer at your local city transportation union.

    Tactfully mention you're just a private citizen really interested in bus and truck driving games (I'm assuming this is why you're wanting one), supply this video link, and ask who supplies such products. They'll probably either give you the contact details for a trade rep or more likely, a catalog/company webpage. This is your most likely angle, and the lowest effort one. If they're hesitant to tell you, mention that you are interested in getting a CDL and were thinking of buying one of these in a pawnshop somewhere to test it out (Or, if that makes you uncomfortable, mention you have a cousin in some distant city who expressed an interest). Just the console, not the full on simulator setup (That would involve actually getting the program and licensing issues and a head-ache). Unless you actually want the simulator itself (No judgements here).

    I'm going to venture a guess that its probably going to be a bit on the hefty side, pricewise.

    Alternatively, its possible this was a kit-build or very skillfully put together home-build job.

    The monitor is clearly off-the-shelf. But the ignition, handles, and switches look like they are attached under the desk. This is most likely, therefore, a student driver simulator, likely a second-hand professional one. The sequence of events seems to be scripted as an on-the-rails simulation, designed to test driver reactions and consistency according to a pre-planned route and schedule. Its definitely European. Without seeing full-screen, I'm going to say its German/Swiss, based on language and Road signs. Its therefore likely made or contracted out by a German Bus manufacturing firm (Daimler AG or Mercedes Benz).

    Another angle is the video itself. If you know the city/location, and if the person is a driving student, you can easily figure out what bus brand that city/locale uses, then go directly to the manufacturer.

    Thanks for the interesting mystery!


    Edit: You could also cheat by taking the video and trying to zoom in on the logo sticker on the upper right handside of the console. Turn it up to 1080p, take a screen grab, then try to eek out details and clean it up, then run the name through the google machine.
    Last edited by Insignus; 25-06-2017 at 07:40 AM.

  3. #3
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus neema_t's Avatar
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    Things like this are very often custom-made rather than bought, but in either case you can expect it to be extremely expensive. It could even be a real bus dashboard that's been cut down with a real bus steering wheel, all wired up to a Leo Bodnar (or similar) board, keyboard PCB or an Arduino or something like that.

    If you want a setup for a HGV or bus or something, I'd suggest looking at getting a Logitech G29, then buying a bigger but not necessarily bus-sized steering wheel for it and an adaptor (which probably exists?) to start with, then look at making or buying a simple panel for buttons, then if you want real dashboard instruments there are options for that too - Android/iOS apps that turn your phone into dials, XSim can push data over USB to an Arduino that could be wired up to some dials, there might be a company that sells something specifically for it... But yeah, it will be expensive but if you want something niche like this you're most likely going to have to build and probably even program it yourself.

    Edit: In the comments you can see he's done some of the work himself using Arduino and it took him 2 years to build, finally he also has more videos about the dashboard itself.
    Last edited by neema_t; 25-06-2017 at 11:55 AM.
    :emofdr:

  4. #4
    Obscure Node SleazyNinja's Avatar
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    Ye but arduino is really cheap, I buy clones for 10 euro and sensors etc for perhaps 2 euro a piece (in China). Problem is that after your prototype is done you'll probably want to print a slicker board and then 3D print casings etc to make it look good. It's the making it look good part that's going to be expensive.

    If more people learned to use arduino (or open source hardware) the prices would drop. I still consider it the future :)

  5. #5
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus neema_t's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SleazyNinja View Post
    Ye but arduino is really cheap, I buy clones for 10 euro and sensors etc for perhaps 2 euro a piece (in China). Problem is that after your prototype is done you'll probably want to print a slicker board and then 3D print casings etc to make it look good. It's the making it look good part that's going to be expensive.

    If more people learned to use arduino (or open source hardware) the prices would drop. I still consider it the future :)
    The "soft" electronics (i.e. the bits you program, as in the Arduino) isn't the expensive part, it's the buttons (each of which could easily cost more than a knock-off Arduino Uno), wheel, interfacing electronics, manufacturing a custom dashboard, LED, dials, any LCD screens you might want... Even just a basic structure for a cockpit can cost hundreds of USD/GBP/EUR, depending on how you want to do it. Plywood cut on a CNC machine or aluminium profile even if you cut it yourself, for instance, is expensive.

    Even just making up a shaft for a bus steering wheel (the wheel itself will cost >50 easily unless you get lucky) is going to be difficult; you'll need a fairly large hollow shaft - steel pipe is quite cheap and will do nicely - huge bearings for each end of the shaft (not so cheap or easy to find, self-aligning bearings are ok but very stiff unless you can open them up, clean out the grease and replace it with something lighter like 3-in-1), a hub to attach the steering wheel (custom-made, not cheap unless you already own a 3D printer) and then maybe some gearing to connect a rotary sensor depending on how you want it done; I'd probably use a hall effect sensor myself which isn't massively expensive, but then you'd also need a mounting bracket for that. That's just one piece.

    I got about 60% of the way through a project to convert my G27 to belt drive, "all" I have to do now is buy a load of 15mm aluminium profile to make a frame, fabricate a custom mount adaptor (sounds easier than it is - I need a piece of Delrin rod, 70mm in diameter, then I need to cut a rectangular hole with curved sides that also tapers all the way down into it!) to fit the original wheel on a 25mm hollow stainless steel shaft and make the more precise parts of the chassis on a CNC machine. Fortunately we have such a machine at work, I just haven't bothered to do it yet. So far the total cost has been over 200 which has included three different hardened steel shafts, a pair of 1/8" to 3mm shaft couplers (not that easy to find!), belts, pulleys with custom machining and bearings for the shafts... That's even using all the original electronics. If I didn't have access to a CNC machine I'd be looking at much more expense, to be honest I started this project before I got the job I have now and I have no idea what I was thinking, I'd never be able to get the sub-millimetre accuracy needed. I should really finish it off.

    But yes, Arduinos are great - I've also got another G27-related project where I'm trying to reverse-engineer the controller board so I can port it to an open-source platform, which will most likely be an Arduino Mega 2560. So far I've gotten a Leonardo to be recognised by my PC as a G27, but that's it. I haven't really touched that for some time now.
    :emofdr:

  6. #6
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Chaz's Avatar
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    Definitely a home build, as the shifter mod he's using comes from here. https://csio.tech/

  7. #7
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Heliocentric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Insignus View Post
    Edit: You could also cheat by taking the video and trying to zoom in on the logo sticker on the upper right handside of the console. Turn it up to 1080p, take a screen grab, then try to eek out details and clean it up, then run the name through the google machine.
    I am once again writing a blog, vaguely about playing games the wrong way
    http://playingitwrong.wordpress.com/

    In case of forum degradation pull cord.

  8. #8
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    That thought definitely occurred to me. Which is why I said "Try to eek out details and clean it up"

    Didn't say it could be done. Or that it would be pretty.

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