Latest Articles (Page 1793)

  • Image for Outcast (Reprise)

    Originally written for the UK's resplendent Edge magazine, this look at action adventure masterwork Outcast features a handful of retrospective comments from one of the key developers from the project, Yves Grolet. Mr Grolet was one of the founders of French Belgian development house Appeal, and was one of the key proponents of third-dimension bearing pixel, the voxel. Grolet is now a senior games bloke at the dubiously named 10Tacle Studios.

    I've given the original text a spruce up by replaying Outcast, and erasing almost everything I originally submitted... Because there's nothing quite like rewriting history. Read the entire thing by clinking that the link, down there. Yep.

  • Image for Organised crime sequel duly organised

    If you're the sort of person who goes on excitedly about how brilliant the end of Mafia was, and how it was the most mature take on the GTA-style game the world has ever seen, then you have a reason to celebrate. Its creators, Illusion Softworks, are working on a sequel, called, in a flash of inspiration, Mafia 2.

    To be honest, I'm not among them - I thought it good, but far from Great and it always felt a little barren in terms of interactivity. That I played it before you were able to skip the early, murderously difficult, circuit racing mission which blocked progress in a way akin to the hilarious and infinitely infuriating driving-test section at the start of Driver. Anyway - enough 'orrible whining. Little else to say. Details are sparse at the moment; there's a press release whose meaning can be boiled down to "There will be a sequel to Mafia. It'll come out on some formats, one of which will be the PC".

    However, it does look pretty. For more pretty, go to its (particularly bare) site here where there are four other examples of pretty. Yes.

  • Glance to your right, down a bit, down a bit more, no, up a little, and there. You'll see we've a few more pages, some of which pertain to you, the perfectly-proportioned reader, and how you can help RPS and the community we hope to build here. Have a read, why not?

    Also, we've a fancy new random-image header to the site, but in some browsers it requires pressing Ctrl+F5 to do a complete refresh, or it'll stick with whatever the last image you saw was until you empty out your browser cache. Which you should do regularly anyway, or the wife (or husband - Ed) will find out about your thing for female bodybuilders (or non-gender-specific, mixed-race, vertically-challenged 8-stone weaklings - Ed). We'll be adding new headers over time, and I guess you can submit your own should you feel so inclined- a 643x293 image of something awesome would do it, ideally with some space around the top left for us to slap our logo onto. Super-splendid ones will go into our banner rotate-o-tron.

  • Image for Bioshockette redux ++

    A semi (well, mostly) re-post of my 10 observations upon the Xbox 360 demo, now updated to reflect my thoughts on the PC one. The original post one is now gone - don't cry for it, it's at peace now. Contains mild spoilers and speculation, but honestly, anything written below is based only on the demo, as I have yet to play the full game, nor have I let Kieron tell me much about it. I also haven't done anywhere near the level of reading around the subject that others have done, as I want to come to it as clear-headed as possible, hence have yet to form arguments about its take on Objectivism and the like. Given the game's now out in the US, there's every chance you'll find I've said something that turns out to be completely off-base. Please resist the urge to let your anger/mockery mean you spoil anything should you post a comment though. I'll be correcting myself as required in a future post.

    Ready?

    Sure?

    OK. Click to read on. Unless RSS skullduggery means you've come straight to the full post anyway, in which case there won't be a friendly clicky any second now and I'll just appear to be speaking nonsense.

    UPDATE: Kieron also plays the demo and adds some comments from the perspective of someone who's played the full game on the considerable differences.

  • Image for The Longest Journey - A Retrospective

    My earlier post about story reminds me of a piece I wrote for PC Gamer a few years back, looking at The Longest Journey, and its lasting effect on me. There was never room for my full thoughts then, and the full length 'director's cut' version has sat on my hard drive since. Clearly Dreamfall has been released since, telling us more about April Ryan, and another retrospective is due for that. Meanwhile, here's the full-length version of the original piece.

    “Mystery is important. To know everything, to know the whole truth, is dull. There is no magic in that. Magic is not knowing, magic is wondering about what and how and where.”

    The Longest Journey almost vanished away unnoticed, another obscurity ranted about by a few, but never reaching any acclaim. In the mire of pre-millennial adventure gaming, it could so easily have been drowned by the density of its peers, ignored by pessimism, never given the chance it so strongly deserved. How it was joyously liberated from this fate is mysterious. And in mystery, there is magic. In The Longest Journey, there is magic.

    As a point and click adventure, The Longest Journey already defied conventions, ignoring the genre’s desperately floundering attempts at “catching up”. Developer and writer Ragnar Tørnquist and his team at Funcom understood that “catching up” was meaningless – they had a story to tell, and a world in which it needed to be told, and so this was the game they made. The natural instinct to say how it recaptured the adventure’s previous glory is strong, but this just simply isn’t true. Adventure gaming had never been as glorious as The Longest Journey – it hadn’t ever even come close.

  • This is an odd one. I haven't seen it linked in any of the other blogs - it's possible I just haven't been paying attention to the right places though - but I found it when researching something.

    (That is, entering random Bioshock related phrases into google.)

    Basically, Andrew Russel, an objectivist gentleman drops Mr Levine an e-mail. And Mr Levine replies, and talks candidly about his beliefs regarding objectivism and world politics and hints at his intentions with Bioshock. And then Andrew posts the replies to the objectivist forums he frequents. To briefly set the stage - and it's worth doing so, as in the UK, Objectivism and Ayn Rand are a lot less known than they are in the States - Bioshock's setting of the isolated city of genius founded by one Andrew Ryan is clearly a riff off Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged, and not necessarily a complimentary one. You may have seen Objectvists turn up in some Bioshock comments threads, voicing concerns (at best) and voicing anger (at worst).

    As Andrew puts it...

    What I am hoping is that BioShock treats the theory of individualism with proper respect. It would be very disheartening if BioShock were to equate individualism with an endless desire to prove oneself superior to others (this being a form of conformist parasitism Rand referred to as Second-Handing), free-market capitalism with making profit as an end-in-itself, or advocate the fallacious notion that laissez-faire is a zero-sum game. As you are obviously aware, Objectivism is often assumed to be wrong, evil, or an engine of societal collapse and disintegration, regardless of the historical evidence in favor of many Objectivist-approved principles.

    Ken replies at length, but a couple of bits stick out. Firstly answering Andrew's questions regarding Shock 2...

  • Image for GCDC: Stories Vs. Games

    GCDC provides another interesting debate, this time on the subject of story in games. Specifically, that games shouldn't even try to make them more complex, as they're simply no good at it. Say the writers of stories in games.

    Bethesda's Ken Rolston and adventure veteran (and man responsible for the frattish Spellcasting series in the early 90s), Bob Bates, both agreed that, "our inability to pay off on all the choices that there should be available. It’s so difficult to make a genuinely complex dramatic choice," in the words of Rolston. Which is, essentially, an argument against non-linearity in games. Which I strongly argue is a good thing.

    In the world of storytelling, non-linearity has only ever existed as a novelty, perhaps a choose-your-own-adventure, or idiotic stunt on the BBC to let viewers call in and "decide" what happens next. But books, television and film have always survived rather well without letting the consumer dictate the story for them. Frankly, if you've got a story worth telling, the last thing you should be doing is letting anyone else get in the way. Games find themselves in a more awkward position, as progression becomes rather dependent on the player interacting in some way. And for most elements of a game, from killing to constructing, this interaction is necessary. But leave the story in the hands of the storyteller.

  • Image for Exclusive: Ken Levine on the making of Bioshock

    When Ken Levine, the main man behind Bioshock and System Shock 2, drops you a line asking if you want to do an interview, you say "yes."

    Levine's a fascinating figure – articulate, driven, passionate. And, no, I don't want to have sex with him. (Denial’s not pretty – Ed) It's worth stressing how this interview came about. Levine – a major developer – mailed me for no other reason than that he wanted to talk. No-one does that. He's played the PR machine on Bioshock enormously hard, clearly very aware of the enormous stakes he's playing for. And he is, in a real, fundamental way. Levine sold the company he co-founded in order to get this game done. Irrational no longer exist in name thanks to selling it to 2K, but without their money Bioshock wouldn't have been made in a recognisable way. It was only possible because of the Faustian deal, and he needs to make the best of it. It has to do what none of its peers and precursors (The Thiefs, The System Shocks, The Deus Exes) have done – become not just a hit, but a enormous HIT. If Bioshock does anything short of changing our world, he's failed.

    So, yes, he likes to talk. As he should.

    Anyway – Bits of the interview end up being cannibalised for features in PC Gamer UK, Wired and Edge. If they come online, clearly, I'll be linking to them – the PC Gamer one has lots of stuff on designers’ ethics and needs, while the Edge one is a making-of look at System Shock 2 (The Wired one's up now, and you've just wandered past its link. And I've edited the PCG one in now too - Ed). However, even with all that, there were still several thousand words of interesting material left spare. In the days leading up to Bioshock's release, Rock Paper Shotgun seems the perfect place to share them. I've included narrative bridges for the bits which have gone into the other pieces to give context. Oh – and this feature was written before I'd played the finished game, having only experienced the first couple of levels in preview.

    We start at a fairly obvious point, but I was fishing for quotes for the more general-readership Wired feature. Bear with us, and read on for Ken's thoughts on the legacy of System Shock, how Little Sisters were formerly insects, the nature of superheroes, objectivism and, of course, much more.

  • Okay, so, a crash course in css coding means I've given the site a bit of a much-needed makeover, plus it should now look as intended in IE6 (though if you're using that as your browser, frankly you're too insane to possibly care what this blog looks like). If you do stumble across any appearance/layout problems, please don't toddle off elsewhere on the internet in disgust: we're still fine-tuning. Instead, please let me know about the problem and I'll attempt to fix it.

  • Image for If there's nothing you like here, you're dead inside.

    Top 100 features: joy to casual readers, peculiar agony to journalists. Fortunately, this useful list of 100 great indie games saves us having to write one. For now, anyway. Go, read, download, play, then come back here.

    Of course, if we were to do such a list ourselves, it'd either be something clever, like the Top 100 surrealist games, or more likely something very stupid, like the Top 100 toilets in games. That last is almost inevitable at some point, in fact.

  • Image for Putting Wow In Something Other Than WoW

    GCDC (the catchy abbreviation for the even more catchy Games Convention Developers' Conference) is under way, as people get their chatter on in preparation for Leipzig's Games Convention proper later this week. GI.biz report on a debate discussing the future of the MMO, called Life After World of Warcraft.

    Despite their recognising that WoW's success is in a large part because Blizzard didn't spend their entire development pretending they'd found a new way to approach one aspect of the genre, but did everything really bloody well, they then go on to announce that this was just a fluke. Of course, the only right way to make an MMO is to waste your budget on a new way to, say, level up or fire a weapon, which you'll ditch during beta because everyone will point out it sucks.

    Attempting to credit Blizzard's phenomenon to their having had an established franchise (try telling Dungeons & Dragons Online that, you twit), Westmoreland (a lovely place for a holiday this time of year) declared, "I think it's an anomaly, and you can't just focus on that because you'll get yourself into trouble." Or indeed, you might accidentally make an MMO more than seventeen people want to play.

  • Image for Bioshock Demo: It's Loose!

    Yes, due to the cheery activity of clever internet bods, they've managed to drag the Bioshock demo from the hands of Fileplanet before release. This caused the preloading to be cancelled and... oh, all manner of stuff. In other words, yes, it's a cheery clusterfuck.

    But that's not really our problem. What matters is it's available. You can get it via a direct download via Softpedia (Which claims to be a torrent, but actually isn't) or torrent via Mininova (Which claims to be a torrent and- strike a light! - actually is). Be sure to update your drivers and stuff - in fact, the reason for the delay in the release is meant to be there's some new drivers for Bioshock coming out today, so it may actually be (er) a bit quirky.

    Meer and Walker are currently excitedly downloading it, and expect some screens in the feature we're lobbing up later today.

  • Image for Graphicsability High. What about Gameplayability?

    While you may not realise it from reading this blog, there are other PC shooters other than Bioshock we give a damn about. No, really.

    Firstly, Eurogamer head off to Germany to actually speak at length to the Crytek guys about their forthcoming Crysis, including getting hands on with the multiplayer section (Deathmatch sounds much as you'd expect, but the Power Struggle seems an interesting cross between a territory-control and base-capture game). Also, predictably, the multiplayer doesn't look as impressive as the single player graphically. Bally Electric Internet not keeping speed with our DX10 explosions.

    While Crysis is the one everyone will be excited about post-Bioshock, I'm personally keeping an eye on White Gold, which PC gamer have lobbed up a short preview of online. You may not be aware of it. It's basically the sequel to Boiling Point, the most critically divisive game of last year. You may remember that Games TM gave it 9 and Edge gave it 2. Meanwhile, me, being a smart-arse, came close to literally giving it both. Enormously ambitious and enormously bugged in about equal measures, the real question with White Gold is whether developers Deep Shadow will somehow manage to keep it under control.

  • Image for Did He Fall, Or Was He Trip?

    In case you missed this heavily linked ShackNews article about someone at EA having made a number of dubious changes to Electronic Arts' Wikipedia entry, here's the lowdown:

    Someone at EA doesn't want you to know about Trip Hawkins, the publishing giant's original founder. On multiple occasions, a user with an IP address of 159.153.4.50--within a range registered to Electronic Arts' Redwood City headquarters--has tried to remove several references to Hawkins' legacy from the Electronic Arts Wikipedia page.

    Poor old Trip. I mean 3DO were rubbish - but don't kick a man when he's... extremely wealthy. Anyway, this all comes via someone actually bothering to use the rather clever Wikipedia Scanner. Good work, ShackNews, you've shone a flashlight in the eyes of shadowy PR, and we at RPS applaud that (although we're less keen on your website colour-scheme).

  • Image for Bioshock: Towards a Backlash

    I've just finished Bioshock. On the 360, alas, but I figured Bioshock a week early is better than spending another seven days trying to dodge spoilers. Here's a picture of the Big Daddy.

    And, beneath the cut, with no-spoilers, here's what's wrong with it.

  • It's worth taking a few minutes to watch this art-design trailer for Team Fortress 2. It references influences such as the phenomenon of increased recognition through caricatured silhouettes, as pioneered by early 20th century commercial illustration, and the background plates from Hayao Miyazaki animations. It gets a bit technical towards them end, but it gives you some idea about the layers of technology that are being artistically smoothed on to games like this. In videogames like TF2 art and science really do meet to give us the best of both worlds.

    Team Fortress 2, like World Of Warcraft, isn't going to age particularly quickly. Unlike games that reach for realistic visuals, these more abstract, stylised graphical themes do not lose much to the ongoing race for visual fidelity. The understand their visual systems, and are just fine with them, thankyouverymuch. Perhaps TF2 could even be a turning point for art design in PC gaming - proving that the tech developed in the last few years does not have to be put to use creating increasingly realistic people and worlds - because what really matters is character, personality, and easily comprehensible environments, and not a really life-like space-soldier.

  • Image for Gearbox's Borderlands To Be Published By 2K

    Gearbox being the blokes who made Brothers In Arms, and 2K being Bioshock's publisher, of course. Borderlands is a post-apocalyptic shooter with vehicles (yes, a bit like Id Software's recent announcement, Rage) delivered in a sci-fi Mad Max style. The game will feature randomly generated missions and even some RPG-style character development, with customisable characters, weapons and vehicles. Best of all, however, is that it's going to be focusing on co-op multi-player. (Also a bit like Rage).

    It's slightly spooky how much some RPS folk have been talking about vehicular combat games in the last few months, and then two come along at once. It's almost as if we're in tune with the zeitgeist, or something.

    Also: the press release was filled with some of the most derivative garbage I've ever read. How many keywords can you fit in once sentence? I mean really.

  • Image for Saturday Night's alright for Nuking. Also, Sunday.

    Defcon was one of RPS' favourite games of last year, if only because it gave me another opportunity to stomp Walker, but this time with Nuclear Warheads for a bit of variety. Which makes us happy that Introversion have just announced a free-play weekend to tie in with the Penny Arcade Expo. From 6pm GMT Friday August 24th 18:00 GMT until Monday August 27th 6am, you can lob strategic nuclear weapons around as if they're going out of fashion. Which, hopefully, they are.

    While clearly a good thing, it's worth noting that the basic demo which is constantly available does allow you to play online in a multiplayer capacity with the limitations of there being a maximum of two players per game (Which is accurate for world-superpower simulator, but a little limited compared to the full game's six) and only being able to play on Standard mode (And not any of the natty variants, like the everyone-dies-REALLY-QUICKLY Speed Defcon). You can also join any Standard games online, as long as there isn't a demo player already in there.

    Which strikes me as a lot of rules to remember, especially for someone hungering to lob nuclear devices towards the horizon, so it may be more sensible to wait until the 24th and have all-gloves-off play of all-gloves-off nuclear war.

  • Image for Bioshock Opens Airlock On Steam Fnarrr

    Good Lord, I'm sorry for adding yet another Bioshock post, but I guess this is kind of inevitable at the moment. (I do want to say that a year ago I started getting very excited about this game, announcing it was the only interesting thing on the horizon, and people thought I was stupid. Ha ha idiots - look at me now!)

    Anyway, news is, Bioshock's on Steam.

    Which is quite a big deal, really.

  • Image for Horrible, horrible game still clings to life

    Playing Archlord was one of the most miserable experiences of my life, including that time I didn't put the lotion on my skin and got the hose again.

    Still, I retain a fascination for this hastily-exported Korean MMORPG's desperate attempts to avoid the axe. It went free to subscribe a while back, and now the client can be had for nowt, too. I can't help but wonder what publisher Codemasters' plan is for it, apart from slowly pissing off the few people who do like the game by making them the only ones who ever had to pay for it.

    True, there's a micropayments system for rare items in there that presumably gleans a few pennies from the dedicated/desperate/mad, but can it really be enough to pay for the servers and tech support? Not to mention the extensive counselling that the GMs who have to spend all day, every day in this staggeringly hideous grind-nightmare must surely require.

  • Image for FarOutHaloKabuto

    Single-player FPS mods, especially ones that aren't brain-agony to play, are pretty few and far between. Adding plot, dialogue, setpieces and incentive to continue takes a lot more effort than making something that's a lot like Counter-Strike but with brown uniforms, after all. Never entirely comfortable with being shot at by strangers who are far better than me at placing bullets inside skulls though, I'm always on the lookout for a good soloplay homebrew effort.

    The intruiging Minerva for Half-Life 2, for instance, is trying hard to tell a good story, and is doing far more efficient things with level design than Valve themselves. When covering it elsewhere, I did find that it had an unfortunate over-reliance on those Find The Door puzzles I despise so much. Happily, the developer popped up in the comments thread, not furious but cheerfully willing to take the constructive criticism onboard. (I really should have replied to him, but I'm forgetful, and a churl).

    So, while waiting impatiently for the next installment, which, wonderfully, apparently has had Valve's own input on the puzzles, I stumbled across this. First Contact: Planetfall is a total conversion for Far Cry, created by the splendidly-named Sharkinacube, a team of students tasked to make a game for their final year coursework.

  • Image for In with a bullet at number 57: Outcast

    PC Gamer have lobbed their annual Top 100 Games EVER online and... no, don't groan, at least too much. PC Gamer have been doing this Top 100 every year for over a decade, before the actual list-malaise took over our whole society (Personally, I want to do an article which lists the Top 100 Top 100s ever). Since it's actually a yearly event, it tends to stress different things than most one-offs Top 100s - basically, the ebbing affections of the writers staff. If you want a picture of where PC Gamer's head are at circa 2006, it's a fascinating picture.

    Avuncular editor Ross Atherton explains it so...

    "At this meeting we will devise a list of the Top 100 Games 2007, and its order. This list is to reflect the games we love, games which we would gladly play today. Argue for the inclusion of your babies - not at the expense of other games, but in support of your favourites, telling us why. Whether released in 2007 or 1987, if you love it and honestly want to play it right now, its inclusion is valid."

    100-51 is here while you'll find 50-1 here. All four of RPS were involved in the process, which involved a delightful afternoon sitting around, talking games and shouting "PEGGLE!" far too often. I won't spoil the results for you, but suffice to say you'll disagree with most of it, which is how it should be. A good list is meant to be the start of a debate, not the end of one.

    Which brings me to Edge's Top 100 which, by those criteria, is a pretty good list. More under the cut, including gleeful bitchery.

  • Image for The Joy Of Bugs

    Inspired by Professional Circumstances, I've been playing Just Cause for the last couple of days, and it's got me thinking about the play-off between freedom and bugs. And, to a large extent, how much I enjoy a good broken bit of game.

  • Scan of a 1960s bomb shelter brochure - more excellent images at this fine fellow's Flickr account.

    Against all odds, ever-struggling games publisher Interplay still functions - despite being nearly $3m in debt. Still, that's better than the nearly $60m in the red it was back in 2001, eh? Now it's a hobo that can afford a wash once in a while.

    Given that actual game sales only contributed $62,000 to the $5.4m Interplay's earned in the last quarter, almost all of the rosy finanical tint it claims to be back in its cheeks was put there by flogging the rights to the Fallout series to Bethesda earlier this year. This seems no cause for celebration to me, rather like saying "I've got this oil well underneath my house, but I can't afford to dig down to it. So I sold it to my incredibly rich neighbour for £20 and a ride in his Ferrari. Now he's even richer, but hey, it's £20 I can put towards my rent!"

  • Image for Synaesthete

    Synaesthete is one of the numerous games to have emerged from the DigiPen game design courses, and like a few other titles from the prestigious games “real-time interactive simulation” design course, it's rather fun.

    The concept is a sort of rhythm-action Robotron, with your tiny laser-pumping manbot running through arenas full of throbbing polygonal baddies and fighting them off by firing energy blasts derived from the beat-sequence timer thing (what is that called?) you get in games like Guitar Hero, or on the PC, Frets On Fire. The fighting therefore pulses to the beat of the music, which is a constant, flowing mix of dance music. And my screenshots really can't capture that, can they? No.

    Anyway, if I had a major problem with this neon-drenched arena-shooter it'd be that it's all a bit spammy and easy – you don't really have to hit the notes (and would struggle to in many cases) since you can pretty much piss out enough shooty stuff with keybashing to defeat the baddies. I'd like to have been forced to hold a bit more of a tune in my destruction. Nevertheless the choice of smartbomb and the tiny energy of your man-block protagonist make me very happen indeed. Good work, students.

  • Image for Future Shock

    Okay, in a vague warm-up for Bioshock - and I figure that anything's a better use of my time than sitting on every single Bioshock thread on the internet and pressing "refresh" all day - I download System Shock from Underdogs and get it working on DOSBox, with full sound (P-P-PATHETIC CREATURE OF MEAT AND BONE!) and everything. It'll be easier if I still had XP installed, as I'd be able to turn to System Shock Portable, which will even run from a USB drive.

    Now, System Shock is a game I've played, but not played, as it were. Before my time by a good four years in terms of PC ownership and by the time I had one, I only went back for historic reasons. They're always memorable. This means that every time I start playing it, I quickly get a sense of archaeological excitement, as if I'm excavating a Roman Ruin and I've just found a diesel engine or something. They did this back then?

    This time, it's a simple one. I'm nosing around at some high shelves, and notice that there's a handful of boxes around. So, in proper modeled-physics, I start to kick them around to form a ladder and... waitasecond.

  • Image for If I Had A Hammer-Copter

    I've just picked up on Hammerfall via the ever-excellent physics-game site Fun Motion, who in turn discovered it on the Russian-language game development forums at GameDev.ru. The game's hour-long demo was posted as an example of work-in-progress - and it's looking fairly polished.

    Hammerfall's concept is simple: it's a 2D weapon-swinging game. However, the weapon swinging is a little offbeat, since you're the pilot of a steam-powered clockpunk helicopter-thing, which has a weapon dangling from it on a chain. You start out with a rock, and end up with hammers and big shiny switchblades. Using these whirling weapons you have to fight off a series of enemies, swarm shoot 'em up style. Evil night maggots and airship-eating wasps, as well as other heli-weapon pilots, all mean that mastery of your martial pendulum-device is essential. It made me feel a bit weird, perhaps dizzy in two dimensions, or something.

    Hmm, I don't think my screenshot quite captures the action... Anyway Hammerfall's tiny skybound fantasy universe is just beautiful and I recommend it to all. As long as you don't mind being referred to as "The Gaiar" by your weapon-whirling tutors.

  • Image for Tabula Rasa: An Experience

    When press types were given our logins for the Tabula Rasa closed beta, it came with a rather peculiar clause. Normally there'd be a line saying, "Say a single thing about this game and we'll tie you by your balls to a lamppost". Tabula Rasa leaves things slightly more vague.

    By accepting our online NDA, you are also agreeing to the following rules for press:

    * The Non-Disclosure Agreement is in effect; while you may talk about your experiences in the game, please do not publish your own screen shots or talk about specific aspects of the game. Since we’re in beta, we are continually fine-tuning the game so something specific you report on may actually be changed before launch...