Posts Tagged ‘ADOM (Ancient Domains Of Mystery)’

Roguelike ADOM making way for Ultimate ADOM

A picture of penultimate ADOM

Adam loves ADOM. There must be something about very old roguelikes that overpowers our deputy editor. The allure of a random dungeon. The temptation to drink every potion at once. But he also once told us that the final boss of ADOM (short for Ancient Domains of Mystery) is his gaming nemesis. Well, now he has a reason to fight that giant ‘@’ sign once again. ADOM is being remastered as Ultimate ADOM. Not to be confused with our own Ultimate Adam, which is just Adam after a 7-minute power nap. Read the rest of this entry »

Podcast: Middle-earth: Shadow of War, The Evil Within 2 and our nemeses

Nemesis this

Who’s your worst nemesis? This week the RPS podcast, the Electronic Wireless Show, is talking about our most reviled enemies, against whom we hold deep, lasting grudges. Matt harbours a lasting bitterness for Silencer, the magic-cancelling war jerk of Dota 2. Adam is fuelled by a dark hatred for the final boss of Ancient Domains of Mystery, a giant ‘@’ symbol called Andor Drakon. And I still maintain a grievance against an entire electricity company in Final Fantasy VII. They killed my friends.

And speaking of nemeses, we’ve had plenty of time to play Middle-earth: Shadow of War, the icon-hoovering game of anti-establishment orcs, which has us divided. The Evil Within 2 also gets some attention, as Adam runs from spectres and fails to stealth-kill hideous monsters, and I am publicly shamed in Tekken 7 by a robot who takes off her head and throws it at me.
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Playing roguelikes when you can’t see

For most of us, traditional roguelikes are intrinsically inaccessible. They’re notoriously difficult, their design is complicated and often opaque, they can have more hotkeys than there are keys on the keyboard, and their ASCII-based visuals mean that it’s often unclear what’s happening on the screen. It’s these exact qualities, however, that ironically make roguelikes accessible and even appealing to blind or low-sight players. Read the rest of this entry »

Roguelove: ADOM Is Now Available On Steam

Ancient Domains Of Mystery (ADOM) [official site] is one of the first things I install on any computer I own or borrow. That’s been the case since I first discovered the game around twenty years ago. Created by Thomas Biskup, ADOM is one of the great traditional roguelikes, a combination of randomised dungeon crawling and a hand-crafted overworld. There are scripted sidequests as well as a Big Plot to follow, and there are oodles of character combinations.

It’s now available on Steam for the first time, in enhanced form. I roguelove it.

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The 50 Best RPG On PC

An entirely objective ranking of the 50 best PC RPGs ever released. Covering the entire history of computer role-playing games is a daunting task and attempting to place the best games in such a broad genre in any kind of order is even more daunting. Thankfully, we are equal to all tasks and below, you will find the best fifty PC RPGs of all time.

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Have You Played… Ancient Domains Of Mystery?

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game recommendations. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

Ancient Domains of Mystery (ADOM) might be my favourite traditional roguelike. To some extent, the ranking depends on my mood, but ADOM has a remarkably well-tuned sense of progression to go along with the usual cluster of quaffable quandaries and randomised dungeoneering. Its sprawling depths are as perilous and perplexing as the pits of Moria and Hack, but the overworld is a fixed entity, with settlements and themed dungeons placed across it. I’ve played it for as many hours as any other game in existence and still find new challenges to overcome whenever I visit.

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Actual Roguelike Alert: Ancient Domains Of Mystery

The purity of the term ‘roguelike’ has been debased and diluted. When I tell you that a game is a ‘roguelike’ you might expect to see platforming, first-person procedural dungeons or, I don’t know, a kart racing game with a cast of death-staring cartoon characters. It’s time to start a ‘Reclaim Roguelike’ campaign and Ancient Domains Of Mystery’s revival is a superb catalyst. The game never really went away but a development hiatus (2003-12) almost as long as Duke Nukem Forever’s actual development cycle (1926-2011) kept it out of the newsrooms for a good while. A successful crowdfunding campaign allowed creator and curator Thomas Biskup to return to development and the game is now riding high on Steam Greenlight and looking better than ever.

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