Posts Tagged ‘ADOM’

Children Of The ADOM: Vanilla Bagel – The Roguelike

Vanilla Bagel [Steam page] is a proper roguelike. None of that roguelite or roguelikelike stuff here – you’ve got a big old inventory to manage, dungeons to explore, impossible odds stacked against you, and a whole lot of things to learn. It appeared on Steam a couple of weeks ago and that was the first I’d heard of it. Last night I decided to take it for a spin and have decided that it has enough in common with one of my faves, ADOM, that it’s earned a spot on my weekend playlist.

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Roguelove: ADOM Is Now Available On Steam

Ancient Domains Of Mystery (ADOM) [official site] is one of the first things I install on any computer I own or borrow. That’s been the case since I first discovered the game around twenty years ago. Created by Thomas Biskup, ADOM is one of the great traditional roguelikes, a combination of randomised dungeon crawling and a hand-crafted overworld. There are scripted sidequests as well as a Big Plot to follow, and there are oodles of character combinations.

It’s now available on Steam for the first time, in enhanced form. I roguelove it.

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Roguelike Mega Collection Torrent Has 700+ Free Games

Free games are great and roguelikes are the best of all games, so a torrent containing more than 700 of the blighters is a lovely thing to discover on a Thursday morning. The collection is the work of ‘foamed’, a Reddit moderator and roguelike curator, and it’s more than a big pile o’ fun. As well as containing some of the greatest games ever made, this is an important archive – there are variants and minor games included that are no longer available elsewhere, and as long as there are seeders, any future disappearances will be protected until our computers turn to dust.

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The 50 Best RPG On PC

An entirely objective ranking of the 50 best PC RPGs ever released. Covering the entire history of computer role-playing games is a daunting task and attempting to place the best games in such a broad genre in any kind of order is even more daunting. Thankfully, we are equal to all tasks and below, you will find the best fifty PC RPGs of all time.

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Have You Played… Ancient Domains Of Mystery?

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game recommendations. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

Ancient Domains of Mystery (ADOM) might be my favourite traditional roguelike. To some extent, the ranking depends on my mood, but ADOM has a remarkably well-tuned sense of progression to go along with the usual cluster of quaffable quandaries and randomised dungeoneering. Its sprawling depths are as perilous and perplexing as the pits of Moria and Hack, but the overworld is a fixed entity, with settlements and themed dungeons placed across it. I’ve played it for as many hours as any other game in existence and still find new challenges to overcome whenever I visit.

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Flowing Traffic: Steam Greenlights Another 75 Games


“Hmm? What’s that?” Valve spins around its chair, suddenly noticing the noise. “E3 just happened and we didn’t release any trailers for far away, in-development games? Right. Yeah, I guess you’re right about that.” Valve reaches over and pulls a rusting level by its desk. *k-k-k-thunk* Seventy-five new games have been greenlit, making their way through the community voting process to now have the right to release and sell their games through the service. This batch includes ADOM, Northern Shadow, The Hit, and a ton more obscure games.

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Actual Roguelike Alert: Ancient Domains Of Mystery

The purity of the term ‘roguelike’ has been debased and diluted. When I tell you that a game is a ‘roguelike’ you might expect to see platforming, first-person procedural dungeons or, I don’t know, a kart racing game with a cast of death-staring cartoon characters. It’s time to start a ‘Reclaim Roguelike’ campaign and Ancient Domains Of Mystery’s revival is a superb catalyst. The game never really went away but a development hiatus (2003-12) almost as long as Duke Nukem Forever’s actual development cycle (1926-2011) kept it out of the newsrooms for a good while. A successful crowdfunding campaign allowed creator and curator Thomas Biskup to return to development and the game is now riding high on Steam Greenlight and looking better than ever.

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