Posts Tagged ‘AMD’

Best graphics card 2018: Top GPUs for 1080p, 1440p and 4K

Best graphics card 2018

There has never been a better time to pick up one of today’s best graphics cards. It’s taken a while, but graphics card prices are finally coming back down to normal, bringing the likes of Nvidia and AMD’s latest and greatest finally within reach again.

To help you choose the best graphics card for your needs and budget, we’re here to help. This article is all about identifying the single best GPU you can get for playing games at 1080p, 1440p and 4K at a price that suits you. Read on for our in-depth buying advice on what and how to buy your next graphics card for 2018.

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BenQ’s EX3203R monitor joins AMD’s FreeSync 2 HDR ranks

BenQ EX3203R

After much weeping and gnashing of teeth and disappointing first looks, proper, honest to goodness HDR finally looks like it’s about to become a reality on PC. We’ve already seen how AMD’s FreeSync 2 tech made the Samsung CHG90 one of the best monitors I’ve ever tested, and it’s shortly going to be joined by the rather stunning Nvidia G-Sync HDR-enabled Acer Predator X27 and Asus ROG Swift PG27UQ over the coming weeks as well.

I’ll have more words on those two Nvidia monitors in the next day or two, but those on the FreeSync side of the HDR fence need not fret about being left behind, as AMD have announced another new addition to their FreeSync 2 roster, this time in the form of the BenQ EX3203R.

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AMD Ryzen 7 2700 / 2700X review: A tense showdown with Intel’s Coffee Lake Core i7s

Ryzen 7 2700X

AMD’s 2nd Gen Ryzen+ CPUs have put on a pretty impressive show so far, from the entry-level Ryzen 3 2200G and Ryzen 5 2400G with integrated Radeon Vega graphics right up to the mid-range Ryzen 5 2600 and 2600X – which for my money are better buys than Intel’s current crop of Core i5 chips. Now it’s time to look at AMD’s pair of flagship processors for 2018, the Ryzen 7 2700 and its souped-up counterpart, the 2700X.

With eight cores and 16 threads each, these top-end CPUs are AMD’s answer to Intel’s fancy 8th Gen Core i7 Coffee Lake chips, most notably the Core i7-8700 and its unlocked, overclockable sibling, the Core i7-8700K. Can AMD pull off that coveted hat-trick of CPU brilliance? The answer would appear to be…sort of, just about, but also not quite.

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AMD’s Ryzen CPUs fight back in Steam’s April hardware survey

AMD Ryzen 5 2400G motherboard

AMD have been a bit on the back foot in recent years, but it would appear the release of their new Ryzen+ CPUs is already paying off. According to Steam’s latest hardware survey for April 2018, AMD took a 4.8% bite out of Intel’s lead last month, taking the number of Steam users using an AMD processor to a new high of 15.96%. That’s an increase of 45% since December 2017.

Things aren’t so rosy for AMD in the graphics card department, however, as Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1060 is still the reigning champion by quite some margin.  Read the rest of this entry »

AMD Ryzen 5 2600 / 2600X review: The Intel Core-i5 Coffee Lake killers

AMD Ryzen 5 2600X

The Ryzen 5 2600 and 2600X are AMD’s new mid-range desktop CPUs, and they’re primed and ready to take on Intel’s 8th Gen Core i5 Coffee Lake processors. With six cores and 12 threads apiece, plus respective base clock speeds of 3.4GHz and 3.6GHz, they may not look like huge improvements over their 1600 and 1600X Ryzen predecessors on paper, but this time it’s what’s inside that counts, as both chips now have a faster, more efficient architecture behind them and better tech to help them reach their improved max boost clock speeds of 3.9GHz and 4.2GHz more regularly.

Today, I’ll be looking at both the Ryzen 5 2600 and its X-rated sibling together in one big mid-range face off, pitching them against each other and seeing how they compare to help you decide which one is worth buying.

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Prepare to be blinded by Philips’ 1000nit 4K FreeSync 2 monitor

Philips FreeSync 2

Who knew late April was the time for oodles of monitor announcements, eh? Well, if yesterday’s news of the FreeSync 2-equipped AOC AGON AG322QC4 didn’t make your eyes pop out of their sockets, then the jumbo Philips 436M6VBPAB almost certainly will thanks to its blinding max brightness of 1000cd/m2.

This giant 43in VA panel is the first of a new line of Momentum monitors from Philips, and is the first in the world to get VESA’s DisplayHDR 1000 certificate rating, essentially giving it lots of the same high-end credentials you’ll find in Ultra HD Premium TVs but in monitor form. This includes that aforementioned 1000cd/m2 brightness, 97.6% of the DCI-P3 colour gamut, and a sort-of 10-bit colour depth panel.  Read the rest of this entry »

AOC unveil first FreeSync 2 monitor, the AGON AG322QC4

AOC AG322QC4

The vast majority of PC gamers may own Nvidia graphics cards, but when it comes to the world of gaming monitors and adaptive frame rate technologies, AMD rule the roost. The reasons for this are unknown. Perhaps it’s because AMD’s FreeSync tech (see our best monitor buying guide for more info on the Free vs G debate) doesn’t require monitor companies to pay an extra royalty fee, thereby making FreeSync monitors cheaper than their G-Sync rivals. Or maybe it’s AMD’s way of pleading with monitor buyers that they really should, please, just get an AMD graphics card.

Either way, there’s another FreeSync monitor about to hit shop shelves, this time in the form of the AOC AGON AG322QC4. This one, however, is a little different. While it’s the company’s first display to get the snazzy FreeSync 2 certification, which should hopefully mean it has similar image quality and high dynamic range (HDR) credentials to the preposterously wide Samsung CHG90, it’s also got a VESA DisplayHDR 400 rating. Here’s what’s what. Read the rest of this entry »

Samsung CHG90 review: We’re gonna need a bigger desk

Samsung CHG90

The Samsung CHG90, or the LC49HG90DMNXZA to give it its full and proper title, is by far the most ludicrous monitor I’ve ever seen. Measuring a whopping 49in across its fancy curved diagonal, this ultra-super-stupidly-wide 32:9, 3840×1080, 144Hz, HDR (let me catch my breath for a second) FreeSync 2 VA display is proper bonkers. And I sort of kind of love it. Read the rest of this entry »

AMD confirm AM4 motherboards will be supported until 2020

AMD AM4 motherboard

After months of murky rumours, vague interview statements and subsequent but equally unclear clarifications, AMD have confirmed once and for all that their AM4 motherboard platform will continue to receive support until the year 2020. This will come as excellent news for existing Ryzen users and incoming Ryzen+ buyers, as it means that any potential new motherboard purchase isn’t about to go the way of every other tech purchase these days and be made redundant in six months. Good times.  Read the rest of this entry »

AMD Ryzen+: Everything you need to know about AMD’s 2nd Gen CPUs and more

AMD CES 2018

AMD’s second generation of Ryzen CPUs are finally here. Also known as Ryzen+ or the 2000-series, these four new desktop chips are set to replace last year’s Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 families, offering more competitive performance compared to Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs.

There’s a fair amount to get your head round, though, especially when you start throwing AMD’s 2000-series (but not Ryzen+) Ryzen Vega APUs into the mix as well, so I’ve put together this hopefully helpful guide that sets out all things Ryzen-related, including the price and specs of all the chips you can buy right now, as well as the proposed release dates for the rest of AMD’s upcoming Ryzen roll-out plan.

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AMD Ryzen 5 2400G review: Impressive 1080p gaming without the need for a dedicated graphics card

AMD Ryzen 5 2400G

Graphics card prices have been up in the clouds so long that the idea of them ever falling back down to something that doesn’t make us weep with despair seems almost as fanciful as the idea of earning more than six pence from the dreaded ongoing crypto-mining craze. They will, of course, come down at some point, but that’s of little comfort to us in the here and now, especially if you’re in need of a new PC.

But let me ask you a question. Do you really need a fancy new graphics card? Because if money’s tight and you’re willing to put up with a few compromises, the AMD Ryzen 5 2400G could be just what you’re looking for.
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Asus unveil new series of Arez AMD RX graphics cards

Asus AREX AMD graphics cards

Brands. I love brands. Especially new ones, because they make things so much easier to understand among all the other brands. I am therefore incredibly excited about Asus’ new AREZ brand for their AMD Radeon RX graphics cards, because ROG, STRIX, TUF, Turbo, Dual, Expedition, Phoenix and Mining just weren’t brandy enough.

This one, you see, is named after the Greek god of war Ares (no, not that God of War), and features new and improved ‘superior cooling technology and a robust software ecosystem’. Because that’s what Greek gods of war are all about now, apparently. Read the rest of this entry »

AMD Ryzen 3 2200G review: The Vega CPU with 1080p gaming chops

AMD Ryzen 3 2200G

Graphics card prices continue to outrage and frustrate almost every PC person on the planet. No one likes spending more than they have to in order to play the newest, shiniest games, but the current cost of GPUs is almost enough to make you want to throw your PC out the window and turn tail to join the console brigade. It’s that bad.

Before you do that, though, you’ll be pleased to hear there’s some very good news to be found in AMD’s recently released Ryzen Vega CPUs. Thanks to their built-in Radeon Vega graphics – Vega being the same name given to AMD’s top-end GPUs like the Radeon RX Vega 64 and Radeon RX Vega 56 – both the quad-core 3.5GHz AMD Ryzen 3 2200G on test today and the quad-core 3.6GHz Ryzen 5 2400G (which you’ll be hearing more about later this week) offer a surprisingly decent stab at 1080p gaming without the need for dropping hundreds of pounds on a dedicated card. Read the rest of this entry »

AMD’s RX 500X graphics cards specs show they’re actually just OEM rebrands

AMD RX 500X

Earlier this week, AMD suddenly put up a load of blank product pages for what seemed to be a new series of graphics cards on its website. The so-called RX 500X series looked as though they might be slightly fancier, faster versions of AMD’s current RX 500 line-up, such as the Radeon RX 580 and Radeon RX 570. Sadly, it turns out they’re nothing of the sort, as AMD’s newly revealed specs for the RX 500X series show they’re pretty much identical to their non-X predecessors. Booo.

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AMD could be readying new RX 500X graphics cards

AMD Radeon RX

Graphics card gossip circles have rather devolved into Nvidia Ampere this and Nvidia Turing that of late, but today brings news that AMD may be about to release a fresh batch of graphics cards to replace their mid-range RX 500 line.

Eagle-eyed Redditors spotted an official product page listing for the Radeon RX 500X series over the weekend, and sure enough the page still exists even now. There isn’t anything there at the moment, but dig a little deeper and you’ll find individual product pages for cards known as the RX 580X, RX 570X, RX 560X and RX 550X.

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Asus ROG Strix GL702ZC review: An AMD-powered 1080p machine

Asus ROG Strix GL702ZC

Most gaming laptops are Intel this and Nvidia that these days, making the fully AMD-powered Asus ROG Strix GL702ZC something of a rarity. Indeed, while AMD’s Ryzen CPUs may be a familiar sight on desktop PCs, this is the first time their top-end Ryzen 7 1700 chip has been taken out for a spin in laptop form, making it an admirable adversary for its Intel Core i7-7700HQ-equipped competition.

Backed up with one of AMD’s 4GB Radeon RX 580 graphics chips and a massive 17.3in 1920×1080 IPS display, the Asus ROG GL702ZC could be just the ticket for those after smooth 1080p gaming you can (sort of) take on the go. Let’s see whether it’s any good. Read the rest of this entry »

Final Fantasy XV graphics performance: Will it kill my GPU?

Final Fantasy XV combat

PC games usually fall into two camps when it comes to recommended specifications. There’s the ‘Yes, you’ll probably be fine’ category, and the ‘SWEET LORD CRYSIS 3 IS ABOUT TO MAKE MY PC MELT’ bracket. Final Fantasy XV, the anime boyband stag do roadtrip JRPG, almost certainly falls into the latter, so I got together a bunch of graphics cards to see how they fared against the almighty Square Enix behemoth.

Now this is by no means a complete list of all today’s available or indeed best graphics cards (yet, anyway), but it should hopefully paint a reasonable picture of what you can expect to get out of it if you’re not quite sure whether your PC’s up to the task. And who could blame you, when the recommended graphics card is a chuffing 6GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 or AMD Radeon RX 480?

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AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 review: A good 4K graphics card that’s just too expensive right now

AMD RX Vega 56

As the great graphics card mining crisis rumbles on, picking a time to upgrade your PC has become a minefield of inflated prices and overblown mark-ups – and nowhere has this been felt more keenly than AMD’s new Radeon RX Vega 56 card and its big brother, the Radeon RX Vega 64.

Whereas the RX Vega 64 targets the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 (our current best graphics card for 4K gaming), the RX Vega 56 takes aim at the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070. That is, an excellent graphics card for 2560×1440 resolutions with ambitions of pushing into the 4K arena with a couple of compromises. And yet their respective prices couldn’t be more different, with the cheapest GTX 1070 currently costing around £500 / $665, while the poor old RX Vega 56 will set you back at least £750 / $750. The easily-parsable Asus Radeon RX Vega 56 ROG Strix OC Gaming version I’ve got here demands even more, too, with prices at time of writing sitting lamentably out of reach around the £840 / $900 mark.

This immediately puts the RX Vega 56 on the back foot, regardless of which make you go for, but assuming everything starts settling down at some point in the future (and good gravy I hope they do), I’m going to ignore prices for the moment and just focus on whether it’s just a good graphics card. Capice? Capice. Let’s get to it. Read the rest of this entry »

Get Far Cry 5 for free when you buy a new AMD PC

Out of my way! Coming through! In March!

Cult-busting simulator Far Cry 5 is coming out at the end of March with a whole bunch of special AMD features, and to celebrate AMD is giving the game away for free for anyone who buys a select pre-built PC system with AMD graphics in it between now (February 27th) and May 20th 2018.

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AMD are sending out free processors to fix Ryzen Vega motherboard issues

AM4 motherboard

AMD’s new Ryzen processors with Vega graphics have been causing quite a stir lately. Offering Nvidia GeForce GTX 1030 levels of graphical fidelity without the need for a dedicated card, the Ryzen 3 2200G and Ryzen 5 2400G are quickly becoming the CPU of choice for many budget system builders – at least when US retailer Newegg isn’t charging $20 more than AMD’s official prices for them anyway.

Now, however, it appears that not all AM4 socket motherboards actually support them out of the box – which is pretty problematic if you’ve just bought a whole new system and don’t have an older AMD processor handy to get your motherboard updated. Fortunately, AMD is on the case, as you can now request a free ‘boot kit’ from them that will let you do just that.

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