Posts Tagged ‘AMD’

AMD’s new Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition update is chock-full of new features

AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition

We all know graphics card software can be a tad hateful at times, but AMD is (hopefully) about to make the lives of its Radeon Software users just a teensy bit better. Say hello to the all-new Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition.

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Best graphics cards 2017 for 1080p, 1440p and 4K gaming

Best graphics cards 2017

There are almost too many top graphics cards to choose from, which is why this here article is all about identifying the single best GPU you can get for playing games at 1080p, 1440p and 4K. Read on for advice on what to pick and how to pick your next graphics card. Read the rest of this entry »

AMD Radeon RX 580 review: Our top pick for 1440p gaming

AMD RX 580

Now that the RX 580, AMD’s patriarch of the Polaris architecture family, is finally back in stock and at reasonable prices, it’s time to reconsider its viability as the centrepiece of a mid-range build. For those unaware, the RX 580 comes in both 4GB and 8GB VRAM flavours. I’m covering the latter here, and it’s hard to make an argument as to why you’d consider the former: it’s not that much cheaper, but does essentially cut you off from the flashiest graphical stuff (like Ultra-high quality textures) in games which support them. Having less memory can also generally scupper you when running with higher resolutions, and considering that the RX 580 appears to have been made with 1440p firmly in AMD’s collective mind, 8GB just makes more sense.

Once again, it’s an Asus ROG Strix OC Edition I’m testing, though since the overclock in question has such a tiny boost speed upgrade from 1340MHz to a maximum of 1380MHz, it should be representative of most partner-made RX 580s. This costs £330, which is a lot considering MSI, Gigabyte and XFX all have alternative models for around £280 or less. Here, however, you do get three fans, a sturdy backplate and an extra HDMI port for VR kit for your trouble.

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AMD Radeon RX 570 review: An all-round 1080p card

AMD RX 570

Back during the Great Mining Drought of a couple of months ago-ish, the RX 570 looked like the saving grace of AMD’s ludicrously price-inflated Radeon lineup. Admittedly, this was mainly due to the 8GB RX 580 being hurled violently though the £300 barrier, but even with fewer ‘stream processors’ (i.e. cores) and just 4GB of memory, the RX 570 was offering another FreeSync-enabled, 1080p/1440p alternative at a much, much lower price.

Now that the whole cryptocurrency thing has (mostly) died down, however, the RX 580 is in a much better position to not just resume its jostling with Nvidia’s GTX 1060 for mid-range supremacy, but also to relegate the RX 570 back to the status of an awkward middle child: not powerful enough to consider over these other two cards (4K, for instance, is beyond it), and too expensive to consider over budget alternatives like the RX 560 and GTX 1050 Ti. Can the RX 570 still justify itself?

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AOC G2460PF review: Superb 144Hz gaming for £170

AOC G2460PF

Take one look at the AOC G2460PF’s price of £170 and you’d probably think it was a pretty standard kind of display. After all, 24in Full HD monitor prices often start around the £100-200 mark, and you can find several screens around the same £170 mark that don’t have anything to shout about other than a mildly adjustable stand.

AOC’s G2460PF, however, is anything but ordinary. Despite its low price, this monitor has a 144Hz refresh rate and AMD FreeSync support, plus a height-adjustable and rotatable stand. It’s not overly garish, either, as the only concession it makes to being a so-called ‘gaming monitor’ is a thin red strip that runs along the lower bezel. Otherwise, you can happily put this on any kind of desk and not be embarrassed about it.

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AMD Radeon Vega RX 64 review: finally some competition for the GTX 1080

Asus Vega RX 64

Just as the Radeon Vega RX 56 targets Nvidia’s GTX 1070, the Vega RX 64 is AMD’s precision strike on the mighty GTX 1080. About damn time, too – by focusing solely on the mid-range and entry-level RX 400 and RX 500 series, AMD has given Nvidia free reign of the premium market for about two years. Time for some competition, methinks.

The model I’m testing is Asus’ ROG Strix version, or to use its full title for the only time in this review, the Asus ROG Strix RX Vega 64 OC Edition. The poetically-named ARSRV64OCE builds on AMD’s tech – which includes 8GB of High Bandwidth Memory 2 (HBM2), which stacks its memory modules units on top of each other, supposedly speeding up how long it takes to talk to your CPU – with a nifty three-fan air cooler and, as the name suggests, overclocked cores. It’s only a little bump, mind, upping the base clock from 1247MHz to 1298MHz and the boost clock from 1549MHz to 1590MHz. As to whether all that makes the RX 64 as capable as the GTX 1080 at 1440p and, perhaps most importantly, 4K, the answer is: yes! Pretty much!

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The last Week In Tech

goodbye

Apparently, Intel will soon be selling CPUs with onboard AMD graphics. I have now, officially, seen everything. Yes, that includes a man eating his own head. I’m therefore leaving immediately for Nepal, where I intend to live as a goat. Which reminds me. It’s been nearly six years since my very first story and I’d like to think I’m unrivalled on RPS when it comes to the shameless recycling of other people’s gags. But, whatever. This is, ladies and germs, goodbye-ee. It’s also time to consider what’s become of the gaming PC over the last half-decade or so… Read the rest of this entry »

Intel and AMD team up for new 8th Gen Core processor

Intel introduces a new product in the 8th Gen Intel Core processor family that combines high-performance CPU with discrete graphics for a thin, sleek design. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Two weeks ago, AMD unveiled its Ryzen Mobile processors for laptops, promising superior graphics performance for ultra-slim devices. Now, it’s Intel’s turn, as it’s just announced a brand-new 8th Gen Core processor that aims to deliver that same premium gaming experience for devices measuring less than 16mm thick. The clincher? AMD’s the one providing the onboard graphics. Funny how these things work out, isn’t it?

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AMD Radeon RX 460 review: A bargain or just bad?

Multi-bazillion-transistor behemoths like Nvidia’s Titan or the AMD Radeon R9 Fury are all well and good, but it’s rare when you meet someone who actually bought one in the wild. ut the stats suggest hardly any of us actually buy them. Very few, if the latest Steam surveys are anything to do by, with not a single Titan showing up in the list. That said, even Nvidia’s mid-range GTX 1070 card is only used by 1.93% of Steam gamers these days, and that’s after a year on sale. Indeed, the second most popular GPU after Nvidia’s last-gen GTX 960 is its old budget board, the GTX 750Ti, proving that cheaper cards are still by and large the most popular choice among the majority of gamers.

AMD’s RX 460 is yet another attempt to capture that end of the market, but since we first looked at it a year ago, AMD’s gone and updated it with a slightly newer variant, the RX 560. You can still buy an RX 460 if you scout around – Scan still sell the 2GB version for around £100 – but it’s the RX 560 that should be your prime consideration. They’re both based on the same GPU, but the RX 560 has a slightly higher clock speed, giving it a small boost to performance. We haven’t looked at the RX 560 in detail just yet, but you can still get a pretty good idea about what to expect based on our following thoughts about the RX 460. Aspirational it ain’t, but could this entry-level board make for good-enough gaming graphics? There’s only one way to find out.

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AMD Radeon RX 480 review: Graphics greatness you can actually afford?

AMD’s pixel pumping Radeon RX 480 is slightly old hat now. Despite its close competitor, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060, being alive and well and readily available to buy, the RX 480 has all but disappeared from online retailers – unless you want to pay massively over the odds for one, of course. That’s largely because it’s now been replaced by the newer RX 580, which shares the same GPU / chipset / thingy as the RX 480, but comes with a slightly higher clock speed, allowing it to run just a teeny bit faster compared to its 480 predecessor.

That said, until we’ve taken a closer look at said RX 580 to find out just how much better it is, you can get a pretty good idea of what it’s like by reading my original thoughts on the RX 480. So how does it perform? Forget the benchmarks, let’s give the new RX 480 a good old grope.

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 review: The 1440p Graphics Card Of Choice?

Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1070 neatly occupies what is normally my favoured slot in the overall hierarchy of any given GPU family, namely one rung down from the top graphics chip that’s actually bought in much more significant volumes. Except, Nvidia’s Pascal family isn’t entirely normal. We’ve already touched base with the GTX 1080 and the GTX 1060, and the GTX 1070 inevitably slots in between.

Things get even more complicated when you take the recently announced GTX 1070Ti into account, which nestles between the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080. We’ve yet to test the 1070Ti, so it’s difficult to say exactly how it compares to the rest of Nvidia’s Pascal pack, but with prices currently hovering around the £420/$449 mark (and regular 1070 prices not that much lower), it could end up being a much better buy than its non-Ti counterpart, especially if you’re after a card that’s capable of super smooth 1,440p gaming. We’ll be updating this article with more thoughts on how the 1070 compares to the 1070Ti in the very near future, but for now, let’s focus on the 1070 proper. After all, when Nvidia claims it can outperform its £1,000 Titan X mega beast, that’s reason enough to sit up and take notice.

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The best gaming CPU for 2017 and beyond

Yes. I know. There has indeed been an awful lot of CPU coverage lately. What with AMD’s Ryzen and Ryzen Threadripper chips, plus the sudden launch of Intel CPUs with up to 18 cores, not to mention Intel finally upping its mainstream ante from four to six cores, 2017 has surely been the year of the CPU. Which begs an obvious question. What is now the best gaming CPU? Judging that on the hoof as the launches come thick and fast isn’t always easy. But now the dust has settled. Now we know how all these new CPUs stack up. It’s time to pick a winner.

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AMD’s Ryzen Mobile chips are finally coming to laptops

AMD Ryzen Mobile

AMD have been making quite the comeback of late. First came their Ryzen desktop processors – which are pretty darn great compared to their respective Intel competition. Then, they went after Nvidia’s GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 graphics cards with their trio of Radeon RX Vega chips. Now, it’s time for AMD laptops to get a look in, as Ryzen Mobile is finally here. Read the rest of this entry »

Intel’s Core i5-8400: the new go-to gaming CPU

corei5-8400-1

Intel’s new 8th Gen Core chips are out and there is much rejoicing. For the first time in about five years, Intel has made an unambiguous step forward with its mainstream CPUs. In short, they’ve bunged in an extra pair of cores across the board. Where once you had two cores or four cores, now you have four cores or six cores. Of course more cores don’t automatically translate into a better gaming experience. But I still think the new Core i5-8400 will become the chip of choice for gamers. Here’s why.

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Intel’s new Coffee Lake CPUs: right chips, wrong price

intelcore

Or should that be nearly the right chips at slightly the wrong prices? Either way, as I was saying Intel has finally pulled its finger out and given us PC diehards something to be other than apathetic about. No, not ridiculoso $2,000 processors with 18 cores. But new mainstream processors codenamed Coffee Lake that have now taken the leap from solid rumour to retail reality. With more cores across the board, it’s Intel’s biggest upgrade for at least five years and undeniably a good thing for gamers.

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Incoming: some excellent new gaming CPUs from Intel

...this isn't one of them

I’m jumping the gun just a little but a few of you have sent emails on precisely this subject and there’s a significant quantity of fairly solid info out there, so let’s talk about the shape of all things CPU and gaming. AMD’s Ryzen chips have very obviously been the big news thus far this year. But completing the picture for the next six months or so is what will shortly amount to the most significant update to Intel’s CPU line up from a gamer’s perspective in about five years. For once, it’s going to be unambiguously good news… Read the rest of this entry »

Update: AMD’s new graphics and CPU awesomeness

AMDVega2

It’s all kicking off at AMD, peeps. The new Vega graphics chip is now more than merely a press release and has finally been released into the wild. Meanwhile, the insane ThreadRipper CPU with 16 cores and 32 threads has also landed. It’s all a far cry from just a few months ago when AMD was soldiering on with an elderly graphics product and a deadbeat CPU line up. Time to catch up with AMD’s latest hardware awesomeness. Read the rest of this entry »

AMD’s new RX Vega gaming graphics revealed at last

vegaair

It’s been an arsingly long time coming but AMD finally has some new graphics tech to flog and for all of us to game upon. The new Radeon RX Vega generation of gaming cards has been announced. Inevitably, we’ll have to wait just a little longer to find out exactly how fast they are but we know enough to begin answering some key questions and posing a few more. Is this the graphics revolution we’ve all been waiting for, for instance, or is it one derivation too many of AMD’s successful GCN architecture? Strap in and let’s go.

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Why Nvidia is overcharging us all off, just a bit

As I was saying, Intel’s CPU strategy has gone into meltdown. As a consequence, the cynicism of its approach in the face of weak competition – right up until AMD pulled its new Ryzen out of the proverbial – has been laid bare. But it’s not just Chipzilla that’s worthy of your scorn. For some time now, Nvidia has essentially been ripping us all off just a little bit. Here’s why. Read the rest of this entry »

AMD’s THREADRIPPER is not a name I created?

THREADRIPPER, I have only just discovered, is the dramatic name of AMD’s new high-end processor line launching in August.

My immediate questions are: when did AMD hire me and why can I not remember?

I’m sure AMD have some very talented copywriters and productnamers but when they name a processor THREADRIPPER and declare their CPU launch schedule to be an “onslaught” I know that it must have been written by me.

Me, who coined 2016’s smash-hit slang name for a fast PC, “silicon-snorting framecrusher”. Me, who’s tipped for Time Person of the Year 2017 for creating its opposite, “digestive-dunking framenudger”. Me, who says things like “pigrig … ripped full of beef with chops to spare”. Me, who writes this garbage every damn day. Read the rest of this entry »