Posts Tagged ‘boardgames’

How Do Boardgame Creators Feel About Tabletop Simulator And Infringing Mods?

We asked Paul Dean of splendid boardgaming website Shut Up & Sit Down to investigate the future of the enormously successful boardgame software, Tabletop Simulator [official site]. He spoke to the creators, as well as boardgame designers, to discover their feelings towards copyright-infringing mods that replicate their games, plus the possible benefits of paid mods and licensed DLC.

The first time I saw anyone playing Tabletop Simulator, I was pointed toward a jury-rigged version of the hidden identity game Mascarade, cobbled together using Dota 2 art for the cards. My immediate response was, “Well, this definitely isn’t going to last.” What I saw in this new software wasn’t just an explosion of interest in board games, but also the potential for so many copyrights to be infringed.

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Cardboard Children – Warhammer 40K: Conquest

Hello youse.

I promise that this will be the last Warhammer or Warhammer 40K related game I cover for a little while. For some reason it feels like there’s a Warhammer everything these days. Warhammer board games, Warhammer lunch boxes, a Warhammer lingerie line at Ann Summers. I don’t want to fatigue you with all this Warhammer talk, so I’ll make sure to cover something a little less Warhammery next week. But what’s a guy supposed to do when Warhammers of every shape and size keep flying through his door? ONLY WARHAMMER.

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Cardboard Children – Xenoshyft Onslaught

When Xenoshyft Onslaught spits you out – because that’s what this game does – you’re left scratching your head and wondering what on earth you can possibly do to win at this game. You’re also full of questions. You’re confused about the way certain cards work. Some of the rules in the rulebook are so unclear that you’ve just had to make a call about what the designers actually meant. Okay, so I think that this Quill Monster thing attacks your first guy then does an additional one damage to the first three guys in front of it. I think. I think. It niggles you. You’ve just been battered hard and you’re not sure if you were battered exactly right.

And yet. And yet. There’s something about this game that just gets its teeth and claws deep into you.

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Cardboard Children – Boardgame News

Hello youse!

We’re off the back of a string of five reviews, so it’s time for a NEWS UPDATE. Let’s call this the NEWS UPDATE OF MAY, or the MAY NEWS UPDATE. Of board games, obviously. And you might be thinking – “Well, Rab, you just did a news update last month, called the April News Update or something. Is there even more news about daft board games already?” And I’m all like that – “Well, yes.”

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Cardboard Children – Forbidden Stars

Hello youse.

Forbidden Stars is the much-anticipated board game of galactic conquest set in Games Workshop’s Warhammer 40K universe. It’s a game from Fantasy Flight Games, who used to do these big epic board games that shipped in what we called “coffin boxes”. Twilight Imperium III, Starcraft, Runewars, Descent First Edition – all these games came in big giant boxes, packed full of miniatures. These games launched before the current board game boom, when board gaming was still quite niche, and players were willing to plow through 40-page rulebooks before getting a game on the table.

But things changed. The audience expanded, and board games started to become more streamlined, more simple. The length of time you could expect to play a board game for started to shrink. Fantasy Flight released a Second Edition of Descent, and it was a prime example of how the industry was shifting. It was cleaned-up, stripped down, faster to run through. The rulebooks were improved and slimmed down. Descent Second Edition was a better game, probably, but it was definitely lighter. It had definitely lost a bit of that crunch.

And me? I was waiting for things to tip back a little bit in the other direction. I was waiting for the big, long, deep games to come back – with a little bit of that new-age streamlining in the mix. The perfect mix of the old ways and the new. And the wait, thankfully, is over.

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Cardboard Children – Fauna

Mate.

Mate. I didnae even know there were that many animals.

Sometimes it’s good to look at a board game that has a little bit of an educational slant to it. Board games are great to play with kids, and there’s nothing better than busting out something that can broaden their knowledge while they play. And you can broaden your knowledge too. Because, most likely, you’re an idiot just like me.

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Cardboard Children – Elysium

Hello youse.

Do you have the thing you need to get the other thing? If you want to buy an object, you need money. If you want love, you need to have the capacity to love. If you want to watch TV, you need to have a head.

What if the thing you needed to get the other thing had no connection with the thing you lost when the thing you wanted is finally in your hands? What if you had the capacity to love, and so did love, but then could choose to throw away your money or saw your own head off with a bread knife?

This is Elysium.

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Cardboard Children – Three Kingdoms Redux

“All great powers reunify after long periods of division, wane and break up after long periods of unification.”

Two years ago, in this very column, I wrote this:

“My dream is to design a Romance of the Three Kingdoms board game. What’s YOUR dream design?”

Today I review a Three Kingdoms board game. It’s called “Three Kingdoms Redux”, it’s by two first-time game designers, and I am completely stunned.

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Cardboard Children – Star Wars: Imperial Assault

Hello youse.

Star Wars: Imperial Assault is a giant box of board game stuff that lets you play two different types of game. One of them is a big campaign thing, with side-missions and a developing story. The other is a skirmish game, where you fling lots of little plastic Star Wars toys on a board, roll lots of dice, and try to come out on top. A campaign-based game is a difficult thing to review. Sure, I could just cover the mechanics and the first few missions, but often problems in a campaign game’s structure only become clear as things develop. The skirmish game is different. I can cover that right now.

And I will.

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