Posts Tagged ‘case-modding’

The best bonkers case mods at Computex 2018

Best Computex case mods

This year’s Computex will probably be remembered for both AMD and Intel’s duelling “Mine’s got more cores than yours, pal” processor announcements and the conspicuous absence of the new Nvidia Turing GPUs. But if there’s one thing that nicely encapsulates the show as a whole, it would be the assortment of mad custom case designs on display.

They’re the logical conclusion of where, judging by two days spent on the show floor, PC component design is heading: big, brash and almost definitely laden with RGB lighting. It’s a testament to how ambitious some of these designs are that even among such flashy company, certain models still manage to stand out. Here are five of them!

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The Story Of QuakeCon’s (Post) Secret Best Case Mod

QuakeCon is over. By now, you’ve probably perused several hundred thousand BYOC (Bring Your Own Computer; basically a gigantic, nonstop four-day LAN party) case mod galleries. You’ve seen the competition winners from every conceivable angle. You’ve ogled the Star Wars action figures, giant NES controllers, weathered Fallout terminals, and very uncomfortable fish alike. But come on: that’s standard flashy case mod fare. This one, however, was created on the fly, during the show, by hundreds of attendees. Its core component? Post-It Notes

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The Dispenser Mod


So I wonder: when people like Bit-Tech post comprehensive instructions on how to build incredibly lavish case mods, does anyone actually go ahead and do it? Have you ever gone and modded up your case or monitor to look like something it isn’t? I’ve got some nice stickers on mine… but that’s about it.

Anyway, go take a look, the next project from arch-modder Ton Khowdee is How To make the make a full-on TF2 sentry gun case. The crazy fool.

A Living Case Mod

Biomodd is a work of installation sculpture, biology, case-modding, and game design by a chap called Angelo Vermeulen. The idea is to create an ongoing relationship between an enclosed ecosystem in the case, and the games being played on the hardware. Vermeulen explains his idea in an interview over on WMMNA:

“It’s a human sized transparent structure that contains several suspended computer components and different types of plant life such as green algae and vines. The computer runs Linux (Fedora) and its monitor will be suspended downwards to illuminate a bed of fast-sprouting seeds. Basically, we’re testing how close we can bring together the biological and electronic world. At the same time we’re also exploring potential game concepts.”

It’s a little unclear what the game concepts entail, because Vermeulen’s project is not only interdisciplinary, but also ongoing and nomadic between various installation spaces. Nevertheless, the core idea (as outlined in this video) is to create a virtual work that is linked to and representative of the biological ecosystem in the case. Playing will allow some manipulation of the conditions the organisms find themselves in, and the condition of the organisms has ramifications for what goes on in the game world.