Posts Tagged ‘Clickuorice Allsorts’

Clickuorice Allsorts: Cute Subnautica Lego pitches

Subnautica Lego idea

A reader sent me some links to really well-done Subnautica Lego pitches on the Lego Ideas forum so I wanted to share them! Here’s Survivors of the Degasi and Exploring the Safe Shallows. The Lego Ideas forum lets people pitch ideas for sets that they want Lego to convert into real products. You need 10,000 supporters for a set to qualify for review and these are nowhere near. They’re also based on a third-party IP – from the T&Cs I don’t think it immediately precludes a set from eligibility but it would complicate matters. ANYWAY! I just really liked how well the projects seemed to get the sense of Subnautica (look at the peeper fish!) PLUS because the submissions can use only existing Lego pieces you could build them/bits of them anyway. The shallows terrain segment gave me some ideas for building my own reef – not Subnautica-themed – using my young relatives’ Lego collection!

Clickuorice Allsorts: Overwatch and in-game toxicity

I want to flag up a video with Overwatch [official site] game director Jeff Kaplan talking about the rise in in-game toxicity. Tackling bad behaviour is interesting, but this video is the first time I can remember someone in a high profile game with toxic behaviour issues spelling out the community members’ own responsibility. He also points out that time spent firefighting is time not spent on other features. “Sure we can try to build game systems to encourage [positivity] more, and we will,” says Kaplan. “But we need the community to own up to their part in the accountability that they have for really creating a great game space.”

Further curious and cool snippets about games can be found via the Clickuorice Allsorts tag page!

Clickuorice Allsorts: Making good detective games

Detective games are a strange genre because it’s so rare they manage to conjure up the feeling of you being a great detective. They fail for a range of reasons but my solution to the genre’s struggle has tended to be that you should play as Watson not Sherlock or Hastings not Poirot – there’s a reason the books are often from the perspective of a bystander – and yet that’s still a cop out. Mark Brown (formerly of Wired and Pocket Gamer, now of YouTube) has poked at the subject in a video* which was a good prompt to think more about the things which do work. If you like it, you can support Mark’s work via Patreon.

*Slight spoilers for Life is Strange. The Shivah and Discworld Noir.

Clickuorice Allsorts: Shenzhen Solitaire on MS-DOS

Shenzhen Solitaire

When I saw that Shenzhen Solitaire – the solitaire minigame spun off from Shenzhen I/O – was out for MS-DOS on floppy disks I’ll admit I nearly consigned it to the novelty promo pile along with emails about cassette mix tapes or my friend whose response to new music is always “Yes, but can I listen to it on my Discman?”. HOWEVER! It gets more interesting because developers Zachtronics have written up the project as a blog post. I didn’t follow all the technicalities, but it was super interesting to know more about the choices the pair made, and the quirks of the systems involved under the hood. I find optimisation techniques fascinating so dirty rectangles discussion was a lovely accompaniment to my cup of tea!

The DOS release is available through a Kickstarter running until September 11th.

Clickuorice Allsorts: How Headlander’s look works

Headlander

You want to click on a thing that’s interesting to read RIGHT NOW? This Clickuorice Allsort is a beautiful-looking confection in the form of the art direction document for Double Fine’s head-swappy Metroidvania, Headlander! Writer and director, Lee Petty, lays out things like the game’s influences, and why particular stylistic choices were made – the use of the colour spectrum to accompany progress through levels, so red and orange for early on and blue/violet for later – BUT it also has all these explicit reminders to the team not to fall into common traps of the trade, like mistaking visual unity for uniformity. If you’re interested in art OR design OR Headlander OR all three there’s loads to pick through and enjoy here.

We’ll try to build up a bag of these Clickuorice Allsorts so you can dive in for an interesting nibble whenever you fancy…

Clickuorice Allsorts: Why Steve Gaynor makes games

steve gaynor

The most recent two episodes of the Designer Notes podcast is well worth listening to if you’re interested in game development. In it, podcast creator (and Civilization IV designer) Soren Johnson interviews Steve Gaynor, co-founder of Fullbright Company and designer of Tacoma. Designer Notes is a podcast about “why we make games,” and typically charts a designer’s career, from the first game they played, to how they got started in the industry and how they ended up wherever they are now. In Steve Gaynor’s case, parts one and two cover early forays into level design, working on a FEAR expansion, joining the BioShock 2 team, designing Minerva’s Den, going indie to make Gone Home, and finally the challenges of making Tacoma. Check out the podcast’s archives for lots more, too – the Amy Hennig episodes are particularly great.