Posts Tagged ‘crowdfunding’

Xenonauts 2 starts its crowdfunding drive with a demo

Xenonauts 2

Kickstarter is always a risk, but so is X-Com. Even a 99% shot has a chance to miss, but you go for it anyway, and I’d say that Xenonauts 2 is in with a pretty dang good chance of being a solid squad tactics game. The fact that it’s halfway to its £50,000 funding goal within two hours of appearing on Kickstarter suggests that their audience agrees, and if you’re still not convinced, there’s a single-mission playable demo to poke around, hosted on GOG.

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Sword of the Stars devs Kerberos branch out to tabletops

Tabletop Simulator

Kerberos Productions – creators of the Sword of the Stars 4X strategy series – may have a slightly patchy track record, but they’re a studio that’s never short on heart. This month, they’ve been Kickstarting funds to start a board games division, adapting their universes into dice-and-cardboard form. Possibly hedging their bets, they also released a prototype of their upcoming Sword of The Stars: The Pit board game as a mod for Tabletop Simulator today, letting folks try it for free.

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Planet X3 is a brand new CGA DOS game in development

Planet X3... and yes, this is VGA. Read more if you want your magenta & cyan hell.

Among the folks I follow on YouTube, I tune into The 8-Bit Guy whenever I feel like seriously learning about retro computer history. On top of his hardware breakdowns and restoration projects, he semi-recently made a strategy game for the Commodore 64 called Planet X2. For some time he’s been working on a PC-based sequel designed to support even the most ancient of IBM-compatible machines, and recently launched a Kickstarter to further fund development, which hit its target within mere hours.

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All pilots, suit up for the stunning Project Wingman demo

Project Wingman

I am in continual awe of what tiny independent developers are capable of these days. While jetfighter action game Project Wingman may boast a couple of additional names on its credits, it’s primarily a one-man project. Given that it looks, sounds and plays every bit as good as Namco’s Xbox 360-era Ace Combat 6, if not better, that’s nothing short of mindblowing. Better still, the lengthy 3-mission demo (which led to the project’s Kickstarter being funded in mere hours) is just the tip of the iceberg of this gorgeous tribute to a favourite series.

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Spiderweb Software launch Kickstarter for new series, Queen’s Wish

Spiderweb Software have been producing huge elaborate RPG series since 1994, and yet there’s still a good chance you’ve not heard of them. Created chiefly by one guy, Jeff Vogel, his series like Avadon, Avernum and Geneforge have incredibly dedicated followings, and we’ve covered them a bunch before. The Avadon series concluded in 2016, and they finished remaking all the Avernums earlier this year, and now, for the first time in seven years, Spiderweb are announcing a new series: Queen’s Wish. And a Kickstarter too. Read the rest of this entry »

Dogfight a giant space-worm in the Solar Warden demo

Solar Warden

They really don’t make space combat games like Solar Warden anymore. Come to think of it, they never made them like this, unless you count the wonky X-Com Interceptor. Currently in its last week of crowdfunding via Kickstarter, Solar Warden is a strange but exciting blend of X-Com style Geoscape management, real-time fleet command and action space combat with the promise of some Descent-inspired encounters in the full game. You can (and should) try an early demo build right here and now.

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Rusty Lake Paradox is a movie/game crossover, seeking funds

You might have noticed that RPS is rather fond of the Rusty Lake series. A collection of free room escape games, and so far three longer adventure games, each introduces aspects of a deeply bizarre and unsettling tale. Twin Peaks meets Ancestry.com. Now the two guys behind the prolific series are making a movie/game crossover for the series, and Kickstarting the project. Read the rest of this entry »

Taste Swery’s The Good Life in prototype demo

To Tom and Barbara, the good life means escaping the rat race to farm in their suburban garden and pash. To Kanye West, the good life feels like Atlanta, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, or summertime Chicago. To Deadly Premonition director Hidetaka “Swery” Suehiro, The Good Life is his next game about rural murder and mystery. Swery and his White Owls studio are currently trying to crowdfund the game, which sends an American photojournalist into an English village where people can turn into animals by night and murder is afoot, but it’s still short of its goal. So last night they released a prototype demo so everyone can poke around. Read the rest of this entry »

Harm Other is the ultimate in videogame morality plays

Harm Other

A starving puppy crosses your path. Do you:
1. Make it a home-cooked dinner [+5 Hero Points]
2. Make it into a home-cooked dinner [+5 Jerk Points]

It’s a conundrum we’ve all faced before. Harm Other – from Something Awful gaming writer turned silly game-maker Dennis Farrell – takes the trope to its most (il)logical extremes. Right now it just exists as a cute little playable proof-of-concept, but a commercial version has been fully crowdfunded, so give it a look, if you want a quick chuckle to end the day on.

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1920’s mech RTS Iron Harvest is a Kickstarter success

Total historical accuracy

I’m not sure if I subscribe to the idea of ‘Kickstarter Fatigue’ being a thing, but it’s hard to deny the increasing difficulty faced by games finding their footing via crowdfunding lately. Iron Harvest, an ambitious RTS using the 1920+ setting (as seen in board game Scythe, based on the art of Jakub Różalski) has been a grand exception. It hit its initial Kickstarter funding goal within 36 hours, and just cleared its final $1.5m stretch goal in the last moments of its month-long funding drive.

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Myst celebrates 25 years with a 7-game collectors box

Cutting edge, circa 1993

As much as we love to snark about Myst and its obtuse puzzles around here, it’s hard to deny the nearly 25-year-old adventure series’ influence on the industry. Developers Cyan are aiming to celebrate the upcoming anniversary with the release of a boxed collectors edition release of all seven games in the series, polished up, tweaked and tuned to make them all play nice with modern machines and all wrapped up in some very authentic-looking packaging.

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Deadly Premonition director’s The Good Life returns to crowdfunding

The Good Life

Part of the reason I’m not a betting man is because I’m terrible at predicting odds. I figured The Good Life was a sure thing when it last surfaced: A unique premise from the quirky director of a cult hit game, with a satisfying chunky art style, a solid (or so I thought) pitch video and the most important thing of all for instant internet success: Kitties. Tons of the fuzzy little friends.

When the original funding drive on Fig tanked, I felt let down. Thankfully, Suehiro ‘Swery65’ Hidetaka and his crew aren’t so easily dissuaded, and they’ve officially re-launched their attempt to fund The Good Life: Now with extra dogs.

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System Shock’s remake back on track, delayed til’ 2020

System Shock

Not too long ago, we reported that things were sounding a bit wobbly over on the System Shock remake’s Kickstarter page. Plans to divert from a pure remake to redesign the game from the ground up had spiraled out of control, and money was running low.

While some less optimistic folks took this as a death knell for the project and declared it done and dusted at the time, the reality of the situation doesn’t seem to be nearly so dramatic. The game is officially back on track using their previous design, but it has come at a cost of time.

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Iron Harvest puts an alt-history spin on Company of Heroes

Iron Harvest

If you’re the kind of history buff who also likes big stompy warbots, you’ve probably seen the art of Jakub Różalski around. His most famous work depicts an alternate 1920s where a technological boom after the first world war led to the early development of gas-guzzling mechs, often depicted standing incongruously amidst otherwise-idyllic farmer’s fields.

The 1920+ setting (as it’s officially known) has already been used in the board game Scythe, but King Art Games (Battle Worlds: Kronos, The Dwarves) have loftier goals for the concept. With Iron Harvest, they seek to adapt these artworks into a single-player, campaign-focused RTS in the vein of Company of Heroes. They just need some extra money to do it, and (ideally) implement multiplayer.

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Duochromatic nightmare FPS HellScreen seeks funding

HellScreen

The nature of some games just can’t be conveyed by a single screenshot. HellScreen above is a perfect example. Unless you know that you’re looking at a Doom-style FPS using an imposing and intense two-colour palette and providing the player with a rear-view window for situational awareness, you’d probably just think your were looking at a wall of mechanical noise, instead of a man battling a robo-squid.

This makes HellScreen a bit of a hard sell, but I do hope that you’ll all take a look at the Kickstarter trailer for the game within.

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Starmancer is a neat looking space station sim inspired by Dwarf Fortress

starmancerheader

If you want to get my attention, opening your Kickstarter pitch with a mention of transhumanism is a great way to go about that. Another great way is to make a game that’s essentially ‘RimWorld in space’, and developers Ominux Games seem to have succeeded on both counts.

Starmancer is a space station sim where you play as a human/AI hybrid tasked with managing a human crew. The devs point to Dwarf Fortress as an inspiration, with colonists that get up to sneaky stuff like blabbing about their days to their crew mates, forming relationships and potentially starting mutinies if you chuck their friends out of airlocks. Starmancer’s Kickstarter campaign is set to comfortably exceed its target, with an alpha that’ll start in the next few months and a full release planned for January 2019.

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In Other Waters explores an alien ocean through a unique interface

Inotherwatersheader

I’m almost ready to leave the enticing waters of Subnautica, so I was pleased to find another alien ocean to submerge myself in this morning. I’ve just played the demo of In Other Waters, a narrative-driven exploration game about investigating a strange planet and doing xeno-biology.

Unlike with Subnautica, my impression of what that world really looks like is entirely in my head. All I actually see of planet Gliese 677Cc is a real-time map, with dots and contours that represent the wildlife and terrain. It’s a great reminder that your imagination can do far better graphics than any video game, and developer Gareth Damian Martin is looking for funding on Kickstarter.

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Cosmic adventure game Genesis Noir is on Kickstarter

genesisnoir

It takes something special to coax me into playing a point and click adventure game. I’ve butted my head against puzzles with arbitrary solutions so many times that I’ve come close to writing the genre off as just not for me, but Genesis Noir has two hooks that draw me in. First, the devs say the puzzles will revolve around simple experimentation, and there’s as much emphasis on them as there is exploring and shaping an abstract universe. Second, that universe is the product of a deific shooting with the Earth a “fragment of shrapnel hurtling towards the fragile heart of a god”.

Devs Feral Cat Den have just launched a Kickstarter campaign, bringing with it more details about the game and a little teaser that’s playable in your browser.

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Trüberbrook’s hand-crafted miniature world is a wonder

Truberbrook

That, up there, is a screenshot. It’s okay to stare. Now consider that it looks just as good in motion, if not better. After seeing some footage of the hand-crafted world of Trüberbrook in action, it’s easy to forget that this is a point-and-click adventure, rather than an Aardman-rivalling work of hyper-detailed miniature animation. But it is, and it sounds rather brill.

A production of German art collective btf, Trüberbrook is their first game project, although they seem to have found some degree of fame over in Germany with a pair of late-night TV shows to their name. Production seems to be going smoothly, with the game already fully funded on Kickstarter after just a few days. Take a look at the trailer and pitch video (featuring some great production scenes) within.

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Blue Omen Operation blends Mario RPG & retro anime

Blue Omen Operation

Sometimes, an aesthetic is all its takes for a game to capture my heart. In this case, a mixture of Go Nagai-inspired retro anime stylings (pointy line-art, intense eyes and big hair ahoy) paired with a colour palette and pixel-art style reminiscent of PC-98 visual novels was all it took for me to sit up and pay attention to Blue Omen Operation, an indie JRPG currently doing pretty well on Kickstarter.

The generously-sized playable demo helped too. It’s rather good. You should try it.

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