Posts Tagged ‘Daniel Dociu’

Guild Wars 2’s art style passes from father to son

Horia Dociu various concept art for Guild Wars 2

Recently I had the chance to talk to ArenaNet (and thus Guild Wars 2) art director Horia Dociu about his work at the studio. One of the interesting things about his promotion to the role is that he succeeds his father, Daniel. As a result there’s a lot in our Q&A which is actually just a touching account of a partnership/mentor/mentee relationship across two generations of a family which was nice to read. I particularly love the point about making sure people have a place where it’s safe to try and to fail. Beyond that we talked via the email questions and answers about the art of the game which has been the most personally satisfying for Dociu The Younger, how to keep an art style from looking dated in a living game and the relationship of concept art to in-game assets… Read the rest of this entry »

BLDGBLOG Interviews Daniel Dociu


Daniel Dociu is the chief art director of the Guild Wars developers ArenaNet, and one of the best concept artists in the business. I was delighted to see that my favourite blogger, Geoff Manaugh, has taken some time out to interview him.

BLDGBLOG: So how much description are you actually given? When someone comes to you and says, “I need a mine, or a mountain, or a medieval city” – how much detail do they really give before you have to start designing?

Dociu: That’s about the amount of information I get.

Game designers lay things out according to approximate locations – this tribe goes here, this tribe goes there, we need a village here, we need an extra reason for a conflict along this line, or a natural barrier here, whether it’s a river or a mountain, or we need an artificial barrier or a bridge. That’s pretty much the level at which I prefer for them to give me input, and I take it from there.

BLDGBLOG, in case you’re not familiar with it, is an admirably progressive architecture blog, which regularly touches on subjects such as science fiction landscapes and videogame architecture. A peerless read.