Posts Tagged ‘Epsilon’

Premature Evaluation: Epsilon

I wonder: what percentage of hostage taking situations are successfully resolved for the hostage-takers? It’s a hard thing to Google, as the general assumption is, not unreasonably, that “successful” in this context means the hostages are released alive. The hostage-takers, however, need not survive at all. Indeed, while videogames tend to present this situation as one of near mechanical symmetry or at least balance, the forces of the state are, in reality, way OP. Sure, they have the difficulty of not wanting the hostages to expire amid the crossfire, but this is surely countered by the need of the state to confidently extinguish such threats without compromise, lest they be encouraged. The win-condition for the hostage-takers, meanwhile, is assuredly not when they have repulsed or killed an assault force; that is merely a reversion to the starting conditions, but with fewer resources and angrier opponents.

Each week Marsh Davies kicks down the door of Early Access and checks the corners for stories and/or blinds himself with his own flash grenade. But not this week, as flash grenades are not yet a working feature of the pre-alpha Epsilon, a tactical shooter in which you struggle to guide a team of exceptionally inert anti-terrorists using a mixture of pre-planned waypoints and firstperson action.

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First Person To Say ‘Portal Rip-Off’ Will Be Shot

Screenshots aren't always the best way to promote a game, eh?

Though it is, and consciously so. But in an interesting way. As is often brought up in discussions about Portal, the aspect of it we ultimately spent all those hours jaffing off excitably about was its characterisation, its narrative, its voice-work – but rarely its portals. It’s telling that Epsilon‘s one-man creator EON started work on the game before Portal was released, but following its announcement – i.e. during that period when we did all expect the puzzles to be the game’s finest element. It starts with the same basic space-rift navigation concept, but then ploughs much, much further.
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