Posts Tagged ‘feature’

Have You Played Command & Conquer Tiberian Sun?

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game retrospectives. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

Oddly, Tiberian Sun was the first C&C I ever played. I spent at least a year of my life obsessed with Dune 2, but Command and Conquer itself and Red Alert arrived during my dark ages – the period where I didn’t have a PC capable of running contemporary games. By 1999, I was back in the game, having built a new system to find out about this Half-Life thing everyone was talking about. When I clapped eyes on screenshots of Tiberian Sun, I was in love – how far it seemed to have come since Dune 2.

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Cardboard Children – City Of Iron

CoIbanner

Hello youse.

City of Iron, a game by Ryan Laukat, impresses not only with its gameplay – which is deep and intriguing – but with its sense of aesthetic cohesiveness. This is a game designed from the ground-up, brick by brick, until it hangs together as a statement of the designer’s artistic intent. The art, by the designer, tells a story of a steampunk world populated by varied strange factions. The game itself tells a story of struggle and greed, and the allure of evil. I like it very much.

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Wot I Think: Zero Escape: Zero Time Dilemma

Flip a coin. If it’s heads, carry on. If it’s tails, embark upon a 20-hour adventure in which you might be cut in half with a chainsaw, dissolved in acid, or turned into nuclear goop in a big uranium-fuelled explosion.

This is the first and most central decision of visual novel/room escape game Zero Escape: Zero Time Dilemma. Nine people are trapped in a facility, and six people must die in order to reveal the six passwords for the exit. What’s more, every 90 minutes, everyone is put to sleep and their memories are wiped, which – as you might imagine – makes everything terribly confusing to piece together, for both them and you.

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Jalopy: Trapped In The Sausage Shop

Jalopy

Something that happens every now and again is I try to play Jalopy [official site]. It’s the driving game where you’re tasked with keeping a dilapidated old car roadworthy as you go on trips across the former Eastern bloc.

I really like Jalopy, but I don’t think the game and I are a natural fit because terrible – or at least non-great – things seem to happen a lot each time I play.

Last time I ran out of momentum to go up a hill but an angry AI driver behind me meant I couldn’t go backwards. In the end I parked on top of that AI driver, abandoned my uncle in the passenger seat and walked off down the dual carriageway.

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Premature Evaluation: The Culling

Every week, Brendan is thrown into the deadly arena of early access to fend for himself amid the crafting games and first-person murderthons. This time, he tries to survive The Culling.

When the man with the pink mohawk walked into my tripwire and got his leg trapped, I knew I had him. This creep had been chasing me the whole way down-river, firing arrows at me and harrassing me every step of the way. He pursued me to the arena in the centre of the jungle, where I quickly set up a handful of traps at various entry points. He plodded in and – snap! – gotcha. I ran at him. This was it. Spear up, Brendan. Revenge!

Then I was smashed in the side of the head with a pickaxe. The man’s team mate was still alive.

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Wot I Think – Human: Fall Flat

It’s hard not to compare Human: Fall Flat with Ubisoft’s Grow Home and Boneloaf’s Gang Beasts, because Human: Fall Flat [official site] tumbles in the exact same physics-powered footsteps. In Grow Home you control a little robot called BUD, unsteady on his feet, using physics to solve puzzles and climb a giant plant. In Gang Beasts you control little blobby creatures, unsteady on their feet, using physics to have multiplayer fights. In Human: Fall Flat you control a little blobby creature called Bob, unsteady on his feet, using physics to solve puzzles and progress through its rooms. However, rather importantly, HFF makes a strong effort to do something appropriately different with the same ideas. Here’s wot I think.

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What Civ VI Could Learn From Civilization: Call To Power

I’m not entirely sure what’s going on. I’m playing Civilization: Call to Power, and at some point the world turned from relative Civ familiarity (with shoddier mechanics) into a Twilight Zone where everything is just… wrong. I think things started getting strange when my still ancient-looking capital city of Rome circa 1700AD started being showered with little animations of paper, crippling the city’s production. Sending a spy to investigate, I uncovered that a man in a blue suit (all the rage in 1600s Thailand, apparently) was behind it all – a scummer lawyer catapulting bloody injunctions.

What in Sid’s name is going on?

Civilization: Call to Power and its sequel are baffling, yet also fascinating – they’re the shameful secrets of the esteemed 4X series that Sid Meier and Firaxis had no involvement with, borne of huge ambitions, an inexperienced dev team at Activision, and (fittingly, given the stifling, all-pervasive role of lawyers in the game), a lawsuit.

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