Posts Tagged ‘feature’

Cardboard Children – Lost Patrol

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There was a time when people who played board games weren’t obsessed with things like “balance”. Back in the day, you’d sit and play a board game and no-one would say anything about the “mechanics”. Nobody ever talked about design. There was a time when a board game was a game inside a cardboard box, and if you were lucky it gave you a measure of fun that you wanted to experience again and again and again.

Lost Patrol is exactly that kind of game. It is a game of inevitable death in the jungle. A game you can’t win unless you get really lucky. A game that if you do win, you’ll be talking about it for months. It’s to Games Workshop’s credit that they brought back this old-school game with its ridiculous hostility intact. This is a 2-player game without balance. One player is probably going to lose, and the other is going to win. The only question is how soon the enemy player will win, and how hard the good guys will get smashed.

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The Visceral And Intriguing Artwork Of Scorn

When the Scorn trailer came out a couple of weeks back I was fascinated by its aesthetic. It has that potent mixture of architecture and biology which skims so close to revulsion but is also incredibly beautiful. It reminded me of conversations about abjection from art history, of ideas about transgressing bodily boundaries, of monstrous organs, dripping fluids…

But I wanted to know what Scorn‘s developers thought. What led game and level designer Ljubomir Peklar and his colleagues to these spaces for their game? Here are their answers and some of the wonderful artwork they’ve shared. You can click on each image for a larger version if you want to examine the fine details!

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Have You Played… Cities: Skylines

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game retrospectives. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

I was certain I was done with city building sims. In fact, I think I thought I was done with sims. Gone was the magic of the classic Sim City 2000, the perfect balance of cartoony mayhem and rude interruptions of graphs. It felt like play, not work, even connecting up the water pipes. The genre disappeared down a hole I wasn’t interested in descending, a terrifying underground world where graphs ruled. And then along came Cities: Skylines, and I was proven wrong.

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Wot I Think: I Am Setsuna

I Am Setsuna is an attempt by Square Enix and Tokyo RPG Factory to recapture the glory days of the JRPG. From the mournful piano overlaying the title screen to the world map where your character stands tall like a rampaging kaiju next to a diorama village, it aims to intoxicate you with nuclear-grade nostalgia – but does it live up to their legacy or is it just a pale, snowy imitation?

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Premature Evaluation: RimWorld

Every week Brendan scours the wastes for an early access title to tame and take home with him. This time, the haphazard space colonies of RimWorld [official site].

Before I tell you about RimWorld, let me tell you a story that happened in RimWorld. It’s about that girl up there, drinking a beer. If you’re not convinced to jump in by the end of this tale, then we have nothing more to talk about. We can’t be friends. Everyone else: we’re still cool. So here it is, the story of Min, a pop star with a privileged upbringing, who is about to come crashing down to earth.

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Wot I Think – Aurion: Legacy Of The Kori-Odan

Like most of you (be honest), I know almost nothing about Cameroon. I also know precious little about communing with ancestral spirits, launching fireballs, or punching dudes in the face. How fortunate, then, that Aurion: Legacy of the Kori-Odan exists.

Released in April this year following a successful Kickstarter by Kiro’o Games, Aurion is many things. It’s a fusion of a side-scrolling beat’em up with a JRPG. It’s the first release by a small games studio in central Africa. It’s a long, winding, and philosophical story inspired by several cultures and genres and forms of media. But what ultimately matters is that it’s pretty damn fun.

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