Posts Tagged ‘flash’

Pillage The Village

What should you be doing right now?

That’s right – smashing cartoon people face down into the ground so they die, and drop their golden coins. Then, when tired, come in and do the same on your computer. See? See what I did there? You thought it was one thing, but then it was something else! Secret of comedy, right there.

A nice big hand.

Pillage The Village is a really impressively crafted Flash game, that involves little more than throwing innocent people in the air, or viciously slamming them against the ground, in order that they die. For all the family! As you progress, the men become harder to murderise, letting out parachutes, or turning invisible in the ninja-style. But your floaty hand of crazed unjustice will see to them, especially as you spend the victims’ coins on new abilities in the betwixt-level shop. Also, “Pillage The Village” is a funny rhyme.

Look, they even made a little label to help us link to it:

Play Pillage The Village

Hyper(BUY OUR PRODUCTS)blast

Those chappies at Alienware, normally famous for making PCs designed for people who put blue lights underneath their Ford Fiestas while playing whatever Kiss.FM told them to listen to at a volume that ensures that neither they nor anyone in the surrounding fifteen miles can actually hear the generic tiresome drone beyond the lung-crushing thud of the bass filling their ample family-friendly boot space, have made a game: Hyperblast.

BUY EXPENSIVE TECHNOLOGY

Clearly it’s a promotional thing, designed to make stupid gaming sites immediately write a post naming Alienware and Intel and linking to their websites, but it’s also free.

More sensible sites would describe Hyperblast as a derivative of WipEout, but we’re choosing to say it’s like a cut-down Megarace, as WipEout never had Christian Erickson.

Perhaps the Flash game took a turn for the less entertaining on track 3, whereupon my car/ship/thing refused to budge from the starting line, but instead just fired uselessly into a wall. Upon restarting, I was able to move, but now I had an autofire, that also chose to spurt out any bonuses the moment I picked them up. But now I have the strangest urge to buy an Alienware PC with an Intel chip inside. Perhaps I’ll buy some delicious Waitrose lemon sorbet instead, and see if that curbs the desire. (Thanks to Eurogamer for the link).

The Visitor (Note: Not The ABBA Album)

I’ve yet to rattle on about my love for Samorost and Samorost 2. Flash games I loved so much I bought the CD soundtrack. (If you’ve never played them, go do so right now.)

I’m sure there’s a genre title for the sort of game, where you have a background on which obvious items can be clicked, triggering animated events. It’s minimal interaction, maximum art. Done badly, it’s the worst sort of pixel-hunt. But done well, it can be really very beautiful.

Bye bye kitten

The Visitor can’t exactly be described as “very beautiful”, but it is done well. An alien creature grub crashes to earth on a meteor, and in a very short game, you help him make his grisly way through a nearby homestead. It’s so refreshingly gruesome, reversing your instincts and having you aid the revolting alien creature to achieve his goals. There are quite a few awkward moments where the next click doesn’t feel natural, but it’s generally possible to muddle past them, and no great chore to click about until you find the right order. And while there’s only one true puzzle, it’s a fun one. Go play.

It’s the work of one Zeebarf, and is his first project of this type. So off to a flying start. Apparently there’s talk of a sequel, and a longer project he’s already working on. Big thanks to reader Will for the tip-off.

And now I’m listening to the Samorost 2 soundtrack again.

The Flash Adventures Of Mateusz Skutnik

Would be the best name for a game ever. It is, however, a description of what I spent half of yesterday playing.

She has the sexiest accent ever.

Skutnik is a former architect, turned Flash animator, who spends his spare time either painting watercolour graphic novels, or designing episodic Flash adventures. It’s the latter that’s caused him to garner a lot of the internet’s attention – attention I somehow hadn’t paid beyond playing his intriguing DayMare Town a few months back.

I began with his most recent story, Covert Front – a tale about being a behind-the-scenes agent during the Second World War, investigating a deep mystery about some manner of experiments being carried out by the Nazis. Fantastically atmospheric, the scratchy, hand-drawn Flash design betrays his architectural skill, creating an excellent cartoon space in which to unravel the peculiar narrative. It’s very much based on what I soon realised was Skutnik’s trademark style – machine-based puzzles, and foraging point-n-click exploration. The two episodes appear to be only the beginning of a larger story, with part 2 – Station On The Horizon – coming out only last week.

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Which-Way Adventure

Ok, this is the stupidest thing you’ll play this year. And I bet all of Kieron’s money that you play it through at least seven times.

A common screen

Which-Way Adventure is a Flash-drawn choose-your-own-adventure where the choice between jumping down a manhole or crawling through a fence can be the difference between becoming trapped in 1908 as a shoe cobbler’s apprentice, or seeing a lady acrobat with her top off before being eaten by a Manticore. Perhaps you’ll destroy capitalism, or maybe you’ll become a hobo, riding the trains, before being eaten by a Manticore. There’s a fairly strong chance you’ll be eaten by a Manticore.

It’s ages old, so snooty netsnobs will sneer, but I, like you, hadn’t seen it before. And our lives are more enriched.

Manifold

Kongregate combine the awesomeness of free games with the hellish nightmare of talking to strangers on the internet. Fortunately, you can ignore the chat windows and concentrate on the games. Or indeed ask for help if you get stuck.

bounce

I draw your attention toward Manifold – a deceptively simple-looking Flash game, involving guiding your little guy from one side of a small screen to the other. Haven’t I sold it yet? Joel Esler’s cunning puzzler makes it more interesting with the inclusion of a Gravitational Manifold Anomaly Device. “Don’t get mad, get GMAD!” Using WASD for movement, you can click and draw on the screen to throw your GMAD at any surface, whereupon it will create a little gravity-defying bubble, propelling you in the direction in which you drew. Using this, you need to thinkum to work out a route past whatever obstacles are in your path.

It’s immediately interesting, and very quickly tricky. But quick and intuitive, and created with a minimalist skill. And free. Oh yes indeed, free.

Attack Of The Z

Let’s all practise our alphabet.

Catch me some zzzzzzzzzs

Except in a really confusing way.

Super Letter Game is a Flashy little number that requires you to find all the letters of the alphabet hidden inside a sea of Zs (which only sounds good if you pronounce it the sensible American way). It’s not easy though. The letters swim and spin in the direction in which you move your cursor. So move toward a letter and it will dash away. It’s all about carefully moving in the opposite direction, and then pouncing at the right moment. And missing those evil Zs. It’s the work of Laurie Cape, a Leeds-based web designer, with a strange mind.

I’ve always found Z to be particularly sinister. It’s not pretentious like Q (what the hell does Q think it’s doing all the way up there in the middle of the alphabet, with the likes of N and R? It belongs at the end, and I’m starting the petition to get it moved now). And it’s not Mr Out Of Sorts K. Z is over-confident, and too powerful for its own good. In Super Letter Game, it’s downright threatening. It’s madly comforting to find a nice friendly C, or a jolly old W, sliding around inside. Don’t worry little letters! I’ll rescue you from the Zs!

Epic Saga

Pyschonauts developers, Double Fine, have released a new range of free, web-based minigames to play. And by “range”, I of course mean, “one of them”. But as the site says under its grand banner, “When there’s only one candidate, there’s only one choice!”

Stolen from Double Fine.

The game is Epic Saga, a beat-em-up that quite literally matches the glory of Rise of the Robots. Looking an awful lot like the wonderful Videlectrix old-skool game spoofs by the Homestar Runner people, it’s hardcore retro something something. (Is this the “delirious rambling” GSW were on about?)

Right and kick, then.

It’s interesting to see that often missed gaming technique of creating games that are hard to not win. Also, it’s really very funny, with comments such as, “Oh my the gods, what have I done?” after a win. Sadly it’s the same end sequence whichever character you play, but if you’ve had enough of Virtua Kombat XVIII constantly beating you because you haven’t practised at it since you were seven months old, this is all quite a relief. (Thanks to Richard Cobbett for the link).

Rose & Camellia

The Independent Gaming Source regularly blogs come interesting ‘indie’ material, but this Japanese Flash game based around aristocratic feminine face slapping is one of the finest referrals so far.

Translation honours go to Selectbutton who report that:

The plot, according to the text below the game, is that the player girl is a commoner who marries into a noble family. One day after the marriage, her new husband breathes his last—but the pampered harpies running the House refuse to give this low-blood the honor that is her due. There is only one way to resolve the matter!

And that’s flicking your mouse across the screen to pulp the chops an array of snooty harridans. I wish I could offer some kind of critical dissection of this, the slapping game. And yet all I can think is that this is the only game ever to have an oscillating “slapping slider” dictate your attack rate.