Posts Tagged ‘George Buckenham’

Tour a virtual gallery in The Zium Museum

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Have you ever been wandering around a museum, turned a corner, and been baptised in a never-ending stream of confetti and balloons? I hadn’t either until I took a stroll around The Zium Museum, a virtual gallery “composed of eclectic and wonderful things”. There’s more to see than confetti and balloons, promise.

The gallery was curated by Michael Berto, who’s used the work of 37 developers and artists to construct a virtual museum. I’ve only walked around it for ten minutes, but you can bet I’ll be heading back this evening for a more thorough investigation.

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A Psychogeography Of Games #4: George Buckenham

This is article 4 of 6, adapted from my Psychogeography of Games series for London’s Videobrains. If you enjoy these articles, please consider backing me on Patreon.

I’m soaked before I even get to George’s door. He lives in ‘Globe Town’ – a small part of North East London in the borough of Tower Hamlets. I call him from Globe Street and walk up and down, failing to find the landmarks that he can see in the regimented tower blocks. In the end he points out a woman with a Dunlop branded umbrella and via her I find my way to the buzzer.

The buttons are silver rounded pale yellow, brushed steel braille under my fingertips, I tap in the number of his flat, stop to take photos of the stairwell on my way up. Wrought iron, broken frosted glass, paint peeling.

George Buckenham is a Londoner. He grew up in the suburbs of SW London, a place called ‘New Malden’, and today (in a month’s worth of rain) we have agreed to walk across London, without once using a map, from where he lives now to where he grew up. 14 miles (22km).

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Of Mice And Gamepads: The Future Of Controllers

If I’m going to be dull and reductive about it, playing videogames works like this: we tell a game something through an input device – say, a gamepad, motion contoller, touch screen or keyboard – and get a response back in the form of images or sound. It’s like a conversation, but it’s shaped by the devices we use to talk. Without the Wiimote, there is no Wii Sports. Without the touch screen, there is no Fingle or Bloop.

If I don’t own the relevant controller, then I can’t play these games. But what if the controller doesn’t even exist? Many games are impossible to conceive of because we don’t have the hardware to act as muse. Are we living on a junk diet of gamepads and mice – or a rich land of controller plenty?

Let’s have a chat with a few developers and see wot what they think.

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