Posts Tagged ‘id Software’

Doom Update Adding New Modes, First DLC Detailed

Even before we got a proper look at multiplayer in the new Doom [official site], it was clear that singleplayer would be its strength. It’s a shame Bethesda have only announced a load of multiplayer DLC, and adding new weapons and things across three paid DLC packs does sound weird for an id Software game. But hey, that’s the plan and it’s going ahead. Today publishers Bethesda announced the first pack will hit August 5th with a new pistol, a new playable demon, new maps, and so on.

New free stuff is coming too, mind. A free update tomorrow will bring new multiplayer modes along with more stuff for the SnapMap editor.

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Quake Champions Video Explains Special Abilities

In all the sound and fury of E3, I’d missed one big detail about the newly-announced Quake Champions [official site]: its ‘champions’ are actually classes each with a unique ability. Oh! Luckily, id Software studio director Tim Willits is on hand in a new trailer to explain the abilities of the four champions revealed so far. Expect charges, dodges, blinks, and dastardly wallhacks.

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How Doom’s Glory Kills Maintain Momentum

This is The Mechanic, where Alex Wiltshire invites developers to discuss the inner workings of their games. This time, Doom [official site].

Doom, the new one, has one heck of a sense of forward momentum. It’s a game of aggression and constant movement. You’re the Doom Marine: you move like the wind and your shots are unbroken by the need to reload.

At the heart of how Doom creates this response in players is a single feature which, paradoxically, is all about pausing your interaction with the game, pressing you so close to the enemy that they often fill the screen. It’s a feature, after all, that was intended to capture something special about the original Doom that had little to do with movement, but it turned out to trigger all kinds of secondary effects. The feature was:

THE MECHANIC: Glory kills

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More FPS For Your FPS: Doom Launches Vulkan Support

A new Doom [official site] update has launched today, adding support for using the Vulkan API on supporting graphics cards. In short, Doom’s guts are now crammed full of the new hotness in goingfastness and the game should run better on most computers, letting you either bask in the glorious frames or crank up the prettiness.

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Have You Played… Quake 2?

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game retrospectives. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

I played Quake sometime around its release, though I don’t remember being enamored by it or spending much time with it. Instead Quake 2 was the first Id Software game I ever really loved, and even then it was mainly thanks to mods.

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Bang! Doom Update Adding Centred Weapons Option

Ooh aren't we old.

The new Doom [official site] already does a fine job of bringing some of that old ’90s feel to modern days, them lot will tell you, but id Software are adding something very old-school. An update arriving this week will add the option to have your fella hold his weapons right in the middle of the screen, just as space marines did back in the day. Oh, the update will also add a ‘Photo Mode’ to help folks take nice holiday snaps.

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Frags For The Memories: Quake Is Twenty Today

Twenty years ago today, id Software released Quake. Following a multiplayer test that gave the world a first glimpse of the studio’s new, cutting edge 3d engine, the full game arrived on June 22, 1996. Its bizarre mash-up of medieval architecture and crunchy, industrial weaponry didn’t run through the sequels, which have focused on both singleplayer and multiplayer combat, and there hasn’t been anything else quite like it in the two decades since release.

Arena-based Quake is set for a revival with the recently announced Quake Champions, but here, we remember the original. Happy twentieth, Quake.

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