Posts Tagged ‘impressions’

Hollow Knight feels too familiar, despite being a solid metroidvania

Hollow Knight [official site] presents a peculiar issue. What do you do with a game that is genuinely good, but rather unoriginal? A game that is so, so similar to others that have come recently before it, but is still a beautifully drawn, solidly built metroidvania? Do you say, “Get this one, because it’s the most recent?” That’s not a coherent argument. Unfortunately for Hollow Knight, I think the design decisions that narrowly define it are really its core weaknesses. Read the rest of this entry »

Initial thoughts on Resi 7’s performance & Evil Deadiness

Adam’s handling our full Resident Evil 7 [official site] review, but in the meantime I thought I’d share some more immediate thoughts on how it runs, what it looks and feels like and if it seems at all on course to be the series reinvention it strove for. (By which I mean: I really, really wanted to play it too and this is how I justify doing so in work hours.)

Note that this does not include any storyline spoilers outside of the barest facts of the setting, or anything specific about the threats you face, but does discuss the broader structure and nature of some early obstacles. If you want to in totally cold, don’t read this yet, but if you already know basically what Resi 7 is about, you’ll be fine.
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Atlas Reactor is a MOBA that doesn’t require reflexes

If Frozen Synapse and Battlerite had a baby, it would bear an uncanny resemblance to Atlas Reactor. Think turn-based MOBA-style combat with an emphasis on predicting and responding to your opponent’s’ next move. If you’re not sure what ‘MOBA-style combat’ really means, have no fear: Atlas Reactor is a unique creature, and experience with its genre-spanning inspirations won’t give you much of a competitive edge. It certainly hasn’t for me.

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17 Day-One Observations About Civilization VI

Unlike Adam, I’ve not been lucky enough to spend the last month soaking in a deep Civilization VI [official site] bath, so I leave it to him to give you the complete picture. I’ve spent a big chunk of today with Firaxis’ latest historical turn-based strategy epic though, and already it’s filled me up with things to say about it. I’m genuinely surprised by how different it feels. There are reasons why I’m massively charmed by it, and there are reasons why it’s been frustrating me.

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Serious Sam VR Is VR At Its Most Stupid & Most Brilliant

I guess I don’t feel entirely comfortable saying that a game about nothin’ but shooting restored some of my damaged faith in VR, but what the hell: yee-haw! In my fond imagining, VR was going to take me to brand new places, not strand me in the blood-strewn alleys of modern videogaming’s norm. There’s no avoiding it, though: Serious Sam VR: The Last Hope [official site] feels so damned good. This is Time Crisis steroidal and unrepentant, eschewing both gimmick and complexity in favour of finger guns and laughter.

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Aragami’s Stealthy Shadows Contain Few Thrills

As a professional ninja, I’m constantly frustrated by the representation of my noble traditions in video games. There is so much more to our art than teleportation and sneaky backstabs. Where is the game that shows our penchant for wicker work? When shall I see the portrayal of every ninja’s natural instinct for Polynesian cookery? Yet again, this is all ignored in Aragami [official site].

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Maize Is A First-Person Puzzler Starring Talking Corn

My major question when first-person-puzzler Maize [official site] got announced was not “lolwut talking corn???’ but rather ‘what even is this game?’ We knew there was anthropomorphic crop but not a lot else. I like not knowing what something is when I come to play it, as it spares me from worrying ‘what if it just does this again or gets that thing wrong?’ So Maize and its weirdo plant-people has had me intrigued. Now, however, I do know what it is. Kinda preferred it when I didn’t.
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