Posts Tagged ‘interview’

Why Duelyst’s Developers Think Going Free-To-Play Was The Right Move

Despite a growing wealth of awesome free-to-play games, the term itself remains a dirty word for a lot of people. But free-to-play isn’t as black and white as some would like to believe. We’ve all paid top dollar for a game only to feel disappointed, and likewise, free-to-play doesn’t have to mean being drip-fed bits of game in between rigorous bouts of patting you down to find where your wallet is. And that’s exactly what Keith Lee and Emil Anticevic, head honchos over at Counterplay Games, the developer of Duelyst [official site], have been trying to prove.

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Fantastic Contraption: Why A Cat Is 100 Times Better

While at GDC I had the opportunity to sit down with Colin Northway, one of the creators behind the excellent VR remake (and the 2D original) Fantastic Contraption [official site]. We talked about how VR worked differently compared with traditional game design or, to put it less mundanely, why a walking cat dispensing sticks is better than a menu system. While at GDC Adam really loved Fantastic Contraption and, I think Graham was having a similarly good time with it back in the UK. We also made it one of our Games Of The Half Year so it’s high time we put this interview up!

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League Of Legends: Whalen Rozelle On How To Build A Fandom’s Connective Tissue

While in China for the League of Legends [official site] Mid-Season Invitational, I spent some time talking to Whalen Rozelle. He’s Director of Esports over at Riot and a lot of the conversation ended up being about creating connections. That’s a focal point for League of Legends at the moment – finding ways to forge personal connections between the professional scene and the viewers and the non-professional players.

Before I get into the Q&A itself I just wanted to say that I think this is one of those peculiar by-products of the way intellectual property and esports collide. There are multiple MOBAs which involve a lane-pushing element but they’re divided up into separate sports because they have different characters, engines, map elements, balancing and so on. Their complexity and their proprietary nature means you need to buy into a particular company to participate, either investing money or time or both.

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The Great Outdoors: The Flame In The Flood

The Flame in the Flood’s [official site] lead designer, Forrest Dowling seemed like an ideal candidate for my ongoing investigation of outdoor worlds in videogames both because of his name and because of his survival game. The Flame And The Flood sees you play as Scout, a woman trying to stay alive as she navigates her way along a fiercely flowing river. It manages to be a strangely cosy version of the outdoors with a wonderful, evocative colour palette and soundtrack. Here’s how it works:

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Overwatch’s Michael Chu On Lore And Storytelling

With Blizzard’s first-person shooter, Overwatch’s [official site] launch a few hours away, senior game designer, Michael Chu, has come to London as part of the game’s global release activities. I assume it’s been a very similar experience for him to playing the game’s UK map, King’s Row, although he tells me there have been “fewer hover-buses”. I was about to explain about the joys of “driving” the Docklands Light Railway but thought I should probably ask Overwatch-related questions instead. Maybe he will drive the DLR tomorrow.

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Twelve Minutes: A Groundhog Day-Style Mystery From The Witness Artist, Luis Antonio

Earlier this year I had the chance to play a prototype of Luis Antonio’s Twelve Minutes [official site]. If you like going into puzzle games as a total blank slate, stop reading here and just know that I was absolutely intrigued, wishing I could take the build away with me to play more. If you want to know more about the game and what Antonio has been working on in snatched hours of the evening in addition to his work as an artist on Jonathan Blow’s The Witness, read on (I’ll try to keep it light on specifics for puzzle fans):

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No Bullshit: The Culture & Creativity Of Cliff Bleszinski’s Boss Key Productions

When we received an invite to visit the studios of Boss Key Productions, Cliff Bleszinski’s new studio, we asked Rob Zacny to represent us. He was there to play Lawbreakers [official site], a game that he approached with some trepidation but the tense multiplayer action won him over. Given that Boss Key is an entire new creative venture for Bleszinski and his team, we wanted to know more. How does the studio work? What is it like to work with the man behind Gears of War, Unreal and Jazz Jackrabbit? And how do you make a salmon with legs?

Right at the front of the Boss Key Production employee handbook is the instruction: no bullshit.

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