Posts Tagged ‘John Carmack’

Oculus and Facebook facing ZeniMax in trial

The legal battle between Oculus Rift owners Facebook and Bethesda parent company ZeniMax, who allege that the cybergoggles are partially built on work ZeniMax own, has reached a jury trial. Turns out, real courtroom battles are nowhere near as fun as Judge Judy or Ally McBeal would have you believe. Still, this week sees folks including Facelord Mark Zuckerberg take the stand, and some of the testimony is interesting or, at least, bantermonious. For one thing, Facebook think VR needs another 5 or 10 years to get where they want it (them ruling the cyberworld?). Read the rest of this entry »

ZeniMax Vs. Oculus: Palmer Luckey Didn’t Develop Rift

I am sorry to bring you an update on ZeniMax’s lawsuit against Oculus, a dispute over how much ZeniMax and then-id Software technowizard John Carmack contributed to the Rift’s development. I’m sorry because courtroom drama is so dry. I’d much rather tell you about how Jessica Fletcher, Phryne Fisher, or equivalent amateur sleuth uncovered evidence, how they charmed their way into a high-society dinner, pumped a suspect for details with grace, then cracked their safe with a bobby pin.

No, instead all I can tell you is ZeniMax lawyers claim that the Rift only became the technological wonder we know today thanks to work by Carmack and other ZeniMax employees, not solely by Oculus founder Palmer Luckey. Heck, they say Luckey “lacked the training, expertise, resources or know-how to create commercially viable VR technology, his computer programming skills were rudimentary, and he relied on ZeniMax’s computer program code and games to demonstrate the prototype Rift.” Oof.

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John Romero Reveals Super Mario 3’s PC Port

Yesterday, on the 25th anniversary of the first Commander Keen release, id Software co-founder John Romero revealed a video of the studio’s Super Mario Bros. 3 demo. Created in a single week back in 1990, the year of Commander Keen, the demo was presented to Nintendo to show the viability of a PC port of the game. The second level has been redesigned to ask the important question: “Like it?”

Whether or not Nintendo did like the demo, history doesn’t make clear. What we do know is that they were concentrating all of their energies on games for their own hardware. How different the PC landscape might be if that hadn’t been the case.

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Oculus Connect 2: Everything You Need To Know

Oculus Connect 2 is currently taking place in California and it’s brought with it a dozen announcements. No, not the price – though it’ll be at least $300. No, not a more specific release date than “Q1 2016”, though they did say the Touch controllers would be out Q2 2016. But if you want to know about watching Netflix in a virtual reality cinema, playing Minecraft on a VR headset, and which games are being developed specifically for the Oculus Rift and Oculus Touch, then read on for details and videos.

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The Zenimax And Oculus VR Lawsuit Is Moving Ahead

It’s an interesting turn of events in the life of Oculus VR. Earlier this week The New York Times confirmed that the lawsuit accusing Oculus VR of stealing trade secrets and code for the development of the headset would not be thrown out.

So what the heck is going on here, exactly? More after the jump.

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Old News: Strafe-Jumping’s Near Death In Quake 3

No, run then jump and hol- no, look, you're just standing there.

I learned to strafe-jump the hard way back when games were games, my keyboard made of broken glass, and my mouse an actual mouse biting my fingers as I clicked. I still welcome Quake Live adding an automated slower substitute. Everyone should get the experience the joys of zipping around like a rubber ball. Though exploiting wacky movement physics bugs is central to Quake in my heart, some have been less keen on it.

Even John Carmack, the chap who inadvertently created all those glitches, once tried removing strafe-jumping from Quake 3. “I hate having players bouncing around all the time,” he said.

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Free-To-Frag: QuakeWorld’s Once-Planned Business Model

Ironically, I took these screenshots running around maps on my own.

When John Carmack started tinkering with Quake’s multiplayer code in 1996, his plans for the QuakeWorld client went deeper than TCP and UDP. Its new netcode made playing an FPS online over dialup not total garbage, sparking the multiplayer FPS explosion, but Carmack had also once intended for QW to be what we’d now consider free-to-play. Though the plans changed and this never happened, I can be endlessly fascinated by scraps of video game history like the time John Carmack thought about selling the right to have a name.

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