Posts Tagged ‘John Romero’

John Romero wants you to buy his Doom 2 floppies

Would you like a $3,000 copy of Doom 2? Sure, that’s a little bit more expensive than the £5.99/$4.99 Steam version, but you’d be getting five whole floppy disks! When the world ends, that plastic might be valuable. Still not convinced? Well then, I guess John Romero will have to sell his copy to someone else.

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Romero family’s Gunman Taco Truck out, designed by 9-year-old

I had heard that Brenda Romero was working on a new, serious game which in part explored the relationship between Mexican culture and food, but Gunman Taco Truck [official site] wasn’t what I was expecting… Oh, wait, this isn’t that? This action game about blasting your way across post-apocalypse United States and selling tacos to the survivors was actually designed by a nine-year-old Donovan Brathwaite-Romero and co-developed by him with his mum Brenda and stepdad John Romero. It’s now out on Steam and there’s a trailer below. Read the rest of this entry »

Romero’s Blackroom Kickstarter Cancelled Until Demo Finished

John Romero and Adrian Carmack have cancelled their Kickstarter for Blackroom [official site], four days after launching it, but will return once they’ve finished a gameplay demo. The pair of former id Software Doomlords and Quakers had pitched Blackroom as an FPS filled with all the good old stuff – circle-strafing, rocketjumping, secret rooms, a metal soundtrack, and all that – but only showed ideas and concept art. Which, yeah, isn’t much for potential backers to go on. They’re hopeful Blackroom will fare a lot better once people can see it a bit.

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John Romero Releases New Doom Map

How can John Romero convince prospective Kickstarter backers that he’s still got it, that he’s ready to make a new circle-strafing gibfest? The Doom and Quake level designer is currently trying to crowdfund a new ‘classic’ FPS with his fellow former id Software pal Adrian Carmack (no, John Carmack was id’s tech guy; no, no relation), but so far they’ve only shown artwork and ideas from Blackroom – not much when you’re trying to get $700,000. So, as a warm-up and to work the crowd, Romero has released a new Doom map, a replacement for E1M4 – Command Control. Download it here.

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Romero & Carmack Return With FPS BLACKROOM

John Romero and Adrian Carmack, two of the founders of id Software, have reunited to work on a new FPS game. It’s called BLACKROOM [official site] and it has just arrived on Kickstarter, seeking $700,000 of funding. As you might expect, Romero is pitching the game as a return to the principles that drove the original Doom and Quake. Rocket-jumping, circle-strafing and “expert abstract level design”. All of the levels will be the work of Romero himself, though there will also be full modding and custom map support, and they’ll take place across diverse environments thanks to a sci-fi plot involving holographic technology gone bad.

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John Romero Reveals Super Mario 3’s PC Port

Yesterday, on the 25th anniversary of the first Commander Keen release, id Software co-founder John Romero revealed a video of the studio’s Super Mario Bros. 3 demo. Created in a single week back in 1990, the year of Commander Keen, the demo was presented to Nintendo to show the viability of a PC port of the game. The second level has been redesigned to ask the important question: “Like it?”

Whether or not Nintendo did like the demo, history doesn’t make clear. What we do know is that they were concentrating all of their energies on games for their own hardware. How different the PC landscape might be if that hadn’t been the case.

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Let’s Watch: John Romero Plays Doom

Then, shooting.

I am rapt watching John Romero play and talk about Doom. Over a two-and-a-half-hour Let’s Play series, the hallowed former id Software lead designer and co-programer has gone into fascinating detail on his level design philosophy, technical tricks, the game’s development, and his other work, but it’s equally splendid to hear about stuff that never happened. Here’s an old idea for deathmatch co-op: played on regular levels with monsters around, the only way to score points is to hit the end-level button first, so players swing between cooperating and making a violent break for the finish. Lovely.

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Doomdump: Unseen Treats From Romero’s Archives

Shoot me from my good side.

“HAPPY 21ST BIRTHDAY, DOOM!” John Romero tweeted yesterday. “In honor of this legal drinking age birthday, I’m about to release some never-before-seen DOOM game art!”

I know what you’re thinking – “21 years old! The US drinking age is barbaric.” Then you pause and realise “Wait, never-before-seen Doom art? Ooh!” And yes, it is splendid. Since then, the id co-founder has shared treasures including scans of the clay models id turned into monster sprites, and all sorts of abilities, textures, and gore that never made it into Doom. It’s a joyous Doomdump.

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Are Social Games Really Social? Games?

FEAR US FOR WE ARE GIANTS.

Embarrassed kids are amusing. A parent or authority figure co-opts a line or two of their lingo, and they act like it’s the cataclysmic end of everything they hold dear as foretold in The Prophecy. It is, to them, a corruption – a barely recognizable remnant of something they once loved that’s been chewed up, spat out, and then obliterated by a fortuitously timed meteor. It’s interesting, then, to watch fully (or at least, mostly) grown adults react the same way any time social games come up.

And yet, while the parent/grandparent parallel still applies, there is some reason behind social gaming’s reprehensible reputation. The overwhelming majority of the titles that gum up Facebook’s works bombard users with requests and notifications while waging a rapidly escalating war on their wallets. Worse, calling them “social” is a major stretch, seeing as friends in Zynga’s “ville” games or even Funcom’s The Secret War are less people and more currency. It’s almost enough to make you wonder if all those “incredible gaming possibilities” Facebook proponents tout are even real. That in mind, I spoke with Brenda Brathwaite and John Romero – whose company Loot Drop just launched Ghost Recon: Commander – about how the modern age has shaped social games and whether or not they’re having a negative effect on the people who play them.

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Hair Apparent: John Romero Details “MMO-ish” FPS

Ahem.
After a number of ventures that took him from an ill-fated N-Gage Red Faction spin-off to an ill-fated Gauntlet sequel, Doom co-creator (with locks that flow like choruses from the mouths of angels) John Romero is eyeing his old-school bread-and-butter. Speaking with Eurogamer, he described his previously hinted at shooter as a “MMO-ish” and “PC first.” I like both of those things. Let us hope his new game is fated to be ill in the colloquial, “that was totally ill” sense and not the one that’s, er, more commonly come to be associated with John Romero.

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John Romero’s About To Make You His Twitter Follower

I bet a Daikatana 2 Kickstarter would actually work

2012 is, I suspect, going to be a milestone year for old men like some of you and all of us at RPS – one in which old names resurged and old genres returned. Schafer, Fargo, Avellone, Harvey Smith, Molyneux (potentially), XCOM and now, perhaps, one John Romero. The lion-maned, occasionally controversial co-creator of Doom has been away from mainstream games for a while now, focusing on social and mobile titles at the likes of MonkeyStone and Loot Drop, but he recently took to the Twitters to declare “Definitely not! I have plans…” when questioned as to whether he’d entirely abandoned “old school FPS.”
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“You Can Shoot ‘Em And They Don’t Go Down…”


John Romero has posted some long-lost video of Id Software in the days just before the release of Doom. It’s a good half hour long, and you can hear various people from Id, as well as the film-maker, commenting in awe at deathmatch in the early FPS. It’s embedded beyond the click. (Thanks to Tim for the tip.)
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