Posts Tagged ‘Kevin Snow’

IF Only: Thaumistry and Southern Monsters on Kickstarter

Southern Monsters Screenshot

Kevin Snow’s work is notable for drawing strongly from specific cultures and folklore traditions. Snow’s two previous works, Domovoi and Beneath Floes, take on folk tales from Slavic and Inuit culture respectively. For Beneath Floes, he collaborated with the Nunavut-based game studio Pinnguaq (Singuistics, Qalupalik), which is why the game is also available in Inuktitut.

Both Domovoi and Beneath Floes deploy illustration as well as text; both show a taste for the uncanny as opposed to the simply horrific. Beneath Floes overlaps the supernatural threat and the threat that comes from our own failings and guilt; and while I enjoyed Domovoi, I thought Beneath Floes was more mature, more complex, and better written.

Now Southern Monsters promises to be Kevin’s biggest and most personal work yet, and it’s on Kickstarter and Steam Greenlight.

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IF Only: What to watch for

Screenshot of Interactive Fiction Database

Most of my columns look at a particular author, game, style, or theme in IF that you might be interested in trying out. But if you’re new to interactive fiction entirely and want to branch out into finding new work of your own, where would you look? Here’s a quick tour of some interesting things to look at and watch for.

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Icy Inuit Horror: Free Interactive Fiction Beneath Floes

Ice floe, nowhere to go.

I hadn’t heard of the Qalupalik, eerie human-like creatures from Inuit mythology who lurk near the edges of ice to snatch disobedient children away, until I played Beneath Floes. It’s a free Twine game with lovely illustrations and music about one person’s encounter with a Qalupalik – yours. It’s also about storytelling, and what stories mean as they’re passed on and retold to different people across years. It’s a mite spooky and unpleasant and cruel and warming and I’ll stop listing adjectives if you go play it. Better you read its words than mine.

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