Posts Tagged ‘mac’

Awake Into Dreams: TRIP

I could have sworn I’d already mentioned TRIP, which seems like what would happen if gentle, musical exploration game Proteus poured hallucinogenics all over its cereal in the morning and shovelled the whole lot into its mouth using a delicate crystalline spoon carved out of frozen absinthe. ‘ART GAME’, says the trailer in brightly coloured letters that desire to be taller than buildings, before proceeding to show various creatures slowly jiving in luridly lucid landscapes. Maybe I dreamt that I wrote about it or nearly wrote about it but assumed I shouldn’t as it had been a dream rather than a PC game. Or I just misplaced a tag or two. It’s out now, on PC and Mac, priced at £7.29. Launch trailer below, impressions when I’ve formed them.

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Space Peril: Drox Operative Now In Beta

Depths of Peril and Din’s Curse are wonderful games that anyone interested in RPGs would be very wise to spend some time with. For why that is, look here and here. They’re among the few non-ascii games to capture most of the reasons that I adore roguelikes with such a burning passion and they contain worlds of consequence and reaction that should make morality sliders and alternate endings blush with embarrassment. A new game from Soldak is of great interest then, particularly when it sounds a bit like DIN IN SPACE. Drox Operative’s beta is available to prepurchasers now. Thoughts when I’ve played it and more info below.

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Bouncing Ball Bearings: Sphere

Sphere is another in an increasing list of impressive student projects created in Unity. Here, a strong central idea is delivered through the medium of a first-person puzzle game with the most flimsy of narrative trappings. What’s clever here, as in so many of these playgrounds of spatial progression, is the mode of transport. Not portals, not cubes, but the titular sphere, a small, bouncing ball which chimes musically as it goes. Recall it with a click of the left mouse and the trail that it followed after being lobbed is marked on the screen; holding down the right button sends the player travelling along that same trail. Trailer below. Play online or download, for Mac or PC, here.

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The Sun Goes Down: A Mother’s Inferno

Boarding school is no place to leave him

Free fear for all! A Mother’s Inferno, created by seventeen students at the Danish Academy of Digital Interactive Entertainment in the fall of 2011, is a short, experimental first-person adventure built in Unity that is interesting despite its flaws. More variety in protagonists is an excellent way to diversify the horror genre, as promised by the trailer for Among the Sleep and where that game will put players in the booties of a toddler, A Mother’s Inferno casts them as a parent. A train journey with a son and mother goes to Hell, literally and rapidly, and plunges into Dantean depths. Available in browser or to download on PC and Mac. Teaser below.

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In Another Junkyard: The Other Brothers

I think The Other Brothers, soon to star in their own “family friendly adventure”, may be distant relatives of The Great Giana Sisters. I thought I’d written about the game before because I know for sure that I’ve watched the teaser trailer a few times and hoped that, despite the Mario connections, the game was going to be pointy and clicky rather than runny and jumpy. The footage just released to /The Indie Game Magazine suggests there will be no pointing or clicking at all, which makes me sad, but perhaps you enjoy having handsome lip furniture, and jumping up and down while being assaulted by giant rats in abandoned warehouses?

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Looking Glass Half Full: Lilly Looking Through

That was unexpected. I saw a link over at IndieGamesMagazine and half an hour later I sit here barefooted, the socks charmed off me by the demo version of Lilly Looking Through which is one of the most beautiful things I’ve ever pointed at and clicked on. There’s a short trailer below in which you’ll be able to see that the heroine might just be one of the most delightfully and attentively animated characters to ever grace a game. It’s more Amanita than Lucasarts, with hotspots to click and activate rather than the freedom of the environment, although the short demo ends with a magnificent introduction to a wider world.

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Wot I Think: Dark Scavenger

John pointed me in the direction of Dark Scavenger and at that point all I knew is that he’d written this about it in the past: “They’re calling it a turn-based combat point-and-click adventure.” He’d also said ‘Wuh?’, ‘Huh?’ and even ‘Buh?’. Swelling with hubris I installed the game believing I could be the man to answer those questions, intricate as they are. That was Tuesday. Today I bring definitive and detailed responses along with an oddly shaped slice of wot I think.

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Tiny World Tour: Ludum Dare 23

Ludum Dare 23, get your Ludum Dare 23 here! I’ve gathered together eleven of my favourites from the recent 48 hour compo/jam, although that’s not to say I’ve played all 1,402 of the entries. The theme was ‘Tiny World’ and below you’ll find a musical, an existential microjaunt, a personbreeding simulation and a space cat trader, with other delights sprinkled about. There are also unconventional marks out of ten, based on number of graphics, similarity to Tetris and inclusion of comical readme file.

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Broom For Improvement: Dustforce Level Editor

Enticingly attractive sweep ‘em up Dustforce will receive a spit, a polish and a level editor tomorrow. It’s all free of charge to existing owners, although that does mean you’ll be spat on and rubbed with a dishcloth whether you like it or not. Their rules, not mine. I used to enjoy making levels for games but at some point it stopped being fun and started feeling like a chore. Imagine my wide-eyed glee when I saw the video below, showing off the simplicity of Dustforce’s construction equipment.

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There’s Wallace: Thomas Was Alone


Thomas Was Alone first came to my attention while I was trying not to watch the GTA V trailer six thousand times to work out if one of the character models was a fatter, older version of an important bloke from a previous entry in the series. I wasn’t sure whether a platform game about quadrilateral quandaries was all that interesting but David Housden’s music decided me, mysterious and melancholy it brought about a quivering of the lip and, having just listened again, definitely reminds me of The Postal Service more than a bit. It’s something of a shame then that the music now has to fade out to make room for narrator Danny Wallace, who you may know from radio, television and books.

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