Posts Tagged ‘maps’

Fantastic Cartography: Why Videogame Maps Matter

I well up a bit looking at this. So many memories.

Every Sunday, we reach deep into Rock, Paper, Shotgun’s 141-year history to pull out one of the best moments from the archive. This week, Adam’s celebration of videogame cartography, from cloth maps to digital records of procedural worlds. This article was first published in 2011.

Some of my earliest memories of gaming are not of the games themselves but of the things that came bundled in the box with them. Whether it was a hefty manual, full of lore and encyclopaedic listings, or a little extra something. My games don’t even come in boxes anymore. Recently, I’ve been thinking about the shelves in the house where I grew up, full of big cardboard slabs with none of this DVD case finery. I’ve been remembering the excitement of opening the box on the bus, surreptitiously because my parents always thought I’d lose the manual or disks before we reached home. And I’ve been thinking about what else I sometimes found inside.

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Counter-Cartography: CSGO Reviving De_Cbble

This is Jim's house, isn't it? Jim! We're in your house!

Dave Johnston is best known for creating de_dust and de_dust 2, but he also made other maps for Counter-Strike. No, I’m not talking about cs_tire, the reddish-brown retirement home which was cut from an early beta. (That’s me establishing my CS credentials). I mean de_cbble, the quaint castle-set map.

Over on the Counter-Strike: Global Offensive blog, the CS:GO team have written about their work in re-creating and updating de_cbble for the new game, alongside an entirely new map they’re adding soon. They say mean things about the old de_cbble.
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Beyond The Alpha: Have Fun In Arma 3

One. Is Looking. For Something. To. Do. Over!
The scenario: you have the Arma 3 Alpha and you’ve exhausted the stock missions the game comes with. You’re also rubbish with the editor, and you don’t live with someone Arma Arm Armasson, who can show you what to do with it. Don’t worry. There’s no such person, so you’re not missing out on his sage wisdom. And Arma 3 is pretty easy to have fun with. Here’s what people have been up to
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Cartoludography: Crusader Kings II Republic Gets A Trailer

Cripes, they'll kill everyone!

If you listen carefully you’ll be able to hear Adam, all the way hidden in darkest Manchester, mumbling to himself about how much he likes Crusader Kings II. Listen now… [mumble mumble awrite ourkid i love crusader kings ii mad for it mumble mumble]. Did you hear it! He’ll be uncontrollable with glee to learn there’s a new trailer for the Republic expansion, as well as two other smaller expansions out now.

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Real Digital: Game Maps Drawn From Memory

Guess the game without cheating

This is wonderful, and as fine an example there is of how videogames exist as something far beyond pixels on a screen. Mapstalgia is a Tumblr blog consisting of videogame level maps drawn (mostly) by hand – from memory alone. Digital worlds recreated solely from the echoes they left in brain-flesh. Obviously there’s a lot of Zelda and Sonic and that lot, but you’ll also find Quake, Freelancer, Vampire Bloodlines, Morrowind, Team Fortress 2, Battlefield 1942 and even King’s Quest II and Zork in there. Marvel at how they evoke places you know well, how they get it both right and wrong and most of all that these layouts continue to exist in human brains long after they were last seen in the digital flesh.

I’m going to have a go at drawing Quake III DM17 from my addled memory alone in a bit – I’ll add it to the post once done, if it’s at all legible.

Via @liquidindian.

Fantastic Cartography: Memories And Maps

I well up a bit looking at this. So many memories.

Some of my earliest memories of gaming are not of the games themselves but of the things that came bundled in the box with them. Whether it was a hefty manual, full of lore and encyclopaedic listings, or a little extra something. Most of my games don’t even come in boxes anymore, although sites such as Steam Covers can help to keep the physical alive. Recently, I’ve been thinking about the shelves in the house where I grew up, full of big cardboard slabs with none of this DVD case finery. I’ve been remembering the excitement of opening the box on the bus, surreptitiously because my parents always thought I’d lose the manual or disks before we reached home. And I’ve been thinking about what else I sometimes found inside.

Read the rest of this entry »