Posts Tagged ‘New Testaments’

Nioh brings a ballet of breathtaking violence

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New Testaments is a new monthly column in which Amr Al-Aaser presents an overlooked modern game and explicates its best ideas.

Nioh is the kind of game that this column exists for. On release it quickly saw itself buried beneath the comparisons to Dark Souls, praised for the ways it imitated the series, and criticised for its failings in repeating From Software’s successes. But while Nioh clearly follows in the precedent set for the genre by Dark Souls, it does so in the same way something like Monolith’s BLOOD follows Doom: with a clear lineage, but with very different aims and aesthetic goals.

Nothing illustrates this difference in attitude more than the ki pulse.
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Sonic & All-Stars Racing Transformed turned the mascot racer into serious competition

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New Testaments is a monthly retrospective in which Amr Al-Aaser presents an overlooked modern game and champions its best ideas.

Sonic the Hedgehog might be fast, but he’s probably not the first thing that comes to mind when you think of top tier arcade racers. So it might catch you by surprise to find out that Sonic & All-Stars Racing Transformed manages to not only build on the legacy of games like Outrun 2, Split Second and Blur, but takes the mascot racer, a genre that often aggravates players with its random elements, and turns it into a serious competitive racer. All while being an absurdly fun celebration of all things SEGA. Read the rest of this entry »

Chronicles Of Teddy makes music into a language

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New Testaments is a new monthly column in which Amr Al-Aaser presents an overlooked modern game and explicates its best ideas.

From the opening titles it’s clear that Chronicles of Teddy is channeling a deep fondness of Zelda II. There’s homage clear in its presentation and its structure. But Chronicles of Teddy never quite reaches the heights of that inspiration. Its world is too meandering, and lacks the dense map design that would keep backtracking from being a problem. It has a good sense of weight and momentum, but its platforming is too fussy and its combat, while enjoyable when given space, never flows the way I wanted it to. No, what makes Teddy fascinating isn’t in the legacy of Zelda, but a quieter, if still revered, game: the LucasArts adventure game Loom. Read the rest of this entry »