Posts Tagged ‘Nuclear Throne’

Humble Indie Bundle 17: Lethal League, Nuclear Throne

Humble Bundles come every fortnight nowadays but the Humble Indie Bundle is still a rare treat, something a bit fancier than the rest – the flagship bundle. Numero diecisiete is now upon us (I know – diecisiete already! but it has been six years of HIBs), a pay-what-you-want bundle of games including Lethal League, The Beginner’s Guide, Super Time Force Ultra, Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime, and Nuclear Throne.

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Nuclear Throne Mod Adds Online Co-op

Online co-op multiplayer has arrived in Nuclear Throne [official site], Vlambeer’s John-pleasing rougelikelike shooter, thanks to an unofficial new mod. YellowAfterlife’s Nuclear Throne Together mod cleverly adds online multiplayer completely with Steam invitations and lobby lists, which is awfully impressive considering Vlambeer never shared source code – this is reverse-engineered. Now you and a pal can try to become kings of the nuclear wasteland together.

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RPS Asks… What’s The Game You’re The Worst At That You Most Enjoy?

Being bad at something doesn’t always mean it’s not enjoyable. And that’s never more the case than when there’s not an opponent to let down or feel crushed by. In the solitary land of single-player video games, it’s very possible to be absolutely dreadful at a game and yet adore playing it. Perhaps it’s even possible in multiplayer gaming too?

For me, the best example is Teleglitch. I’m not even going to tell you how embarrassingly far I’ve gotten into that game, but I’ve played it so much. But what is it for you?

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Nuclear Throne’s Vlambeer: “If The Customer Was Always Right I Wouldn’t Have A Job”

When I meet Vlambeer’s Rami Ismail, it’s in the middle of the annual Develop conference in Brighton. He’s a striking figure in a sea that’s half middle-aged businessmen and half wide-eyed, unshaven young developers in t-shirts: improbably tall, wearing a leather jacket on a hot summer’s day, hair everywhere, and a mile-a-minute patter that conveys extreme confidence without evident arrogance. He’s nearing the end of Ramadan, which means he hasn’t eaten during the day for several weeks, but has the energy and enthusiasm of someone about to climb Everest. Like his company’s offbeat action games and his often highly outspoken social media style or not, it is little surprise that this guy became so successful – though of course the raw, joyful appeal of games including Nuclear Throne, Super Crate Box, Luftrausers and Ridiculous Fishing went a long way towards that.

But would the confidence and conviction that he has when he wades headlong into the gaming issues of the day or, as he does in his keynote Develop speech the next day, declare that listening to one’s customers is not necessarily the best policy, be there if he didn’t already have the safety net of that success? In the unedited transcript below, we talk about that, about his feelings towards his own customers, indie ‘luck’, why games want rockstars, Ubisoft’s women characters controversy and why he doesn’t feel he can tell anyone else how to be successful.
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Swimming Upstream: Twitch Sells, Funds Indie Games

I've got those millions-of-random-Internet-kids-screaming-in-my-head-at-all-once blues

Twitch has its fair share of problems, but there’s no denying the utter ubiquity of the massive videogame streaming service. Heck, I use it for two separate shows here on RPS, and I’m sure plenty of you stream out your cursing-and-bad-joke-ridden exploits as well. It’s interesting, then, to see what Twitch has decided to do with the powder keg of potential influence sitting right beneath its purple buttocks. Its latest decision? A move into game sales and – in one special case – funding. You can now purchase Vlambeer’s madly addictive Nuclear Throne from Twitch. Meanwhile, the Twitch Plays Pokemon inspired Choice Chamber is having its Kickstarter funding matched dollar-for-dollar by the streaming goliath.

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