Posts Tagged ‘NVIDIA’

EA’s Project Pica Pica leads new wave of photorealistic ray-tracing graphics demos at GDC 2018

Project Pica Pica

You love games. We love games. We love 2D games, 3D games, pixel games, life-like games, even slightly shonky-looking games. But what about if games looked, I don’t know, even better? Like, cinematic rendering, photorealistic kind of better? Well, Nvidia are on the case, as they’ve just announced their brand-new, not-at-all-incomprehensible “RTX Ray-Tracing” technology at GDC 2018.

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Nvidia’s Turing graphics cards apparently delayed AGAIN

Not Nvidia's Turing

Normally, delays are considered a Bad Thing, but as the great graphics card price crisis rumbles on, it’s not like any of us actually have any money to upgrade our PCs anyway, so the later, the better, really, when it comes to hardware.

Indeed, the latest gossip appears to suggest that Nvidia’s next-gen Turing graphics cards won’t be here until the autumn now, after previously being tipped for a reveal at the end of this month during Nvidia’s GTC conference, and then later for a mid-June release date once that initial rumour had been well and truly busted.

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Maybe Nvidia won’t be releasing their new Ampere/Turing graphics cards at GTC 2018 after all

Wrong kind of Turing

Earlier this week, the hot goss on the graphics card grapevine was that Nvidia was going to launch its new, next-gen line-up of GeForce GTX graphics cards at this year’s GTC 2018 conference later this month. Dubbed Ampere, or maybe even Turing (no one can quite decide between the two it seems), these cards would replace Nvidia’s current range of 10-series cards, such as the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 etc, with a brand-new, potential 20-series or maybe even 11-series of cards that would go something like the GTX 2070 and GTX 2080, or GTX 1170 or GTX 1180, making some of this generation’s best graphics cards even better.

However, despite several outlets confirming with  lots of ‘sources close to the matter’ that this will in fact happen, a new report from Tom’s Hardware suggests that all this is actually a load of hogwash and Nvidia won’t be launching anything of the sort at GTC this year, or indeed GDC while we’re on conferences beginning with the letter ‘G’.

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Nvidia’s new Ampere GeForce graphics cards could be here as soon as April

Nvidia Titan V reveal

Nvidia’s next generation of GeForce GTX graphics cards could be here as soon as April, according to the GPU rumour mill, with their first public unveiling taking place at the company’s GPU Technology Conference (GTC) next month.

That’s according to TweakTown, who spoke to a “well-placed source” in the graphics card business. We love us some well-placed sources us.

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The great GPU crisis – why are graphics cards so expensive now, and just how bad is it?

ZEC tales

Updated to reflect the latest, even more horrifying graphics card prices & availability, plus the concurrent RAM shortage.

If you’ve made a point of leaving any conversation as soon as you hear the sound ‘bitc…’ start to emanate from someone’s face-hole, I’ve got some bad news for you. The effects of the cryptocurrency goldrush are no longer confined to twitchy-eyed evangelists and screechy news headlines – for the second time in recent memory, it’s caused a huge spike in graphics card prices, both new and second-hand, as the crypto-clan rush to snaffle up any GPU they could possibly use to mine blockchain currencies such as Ethereum and Zcash. Even the recent decline in crypto exchange rates hasn’t brought GPU pricing back down to Earth – quite the opposite, in fact.

This means two things for us, in practice. 1) Now is the worst possible time to buy a new graphics card for gaming 2) now is the best possible time to sell on any unused old graphics cards you own.
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Best graphics cards 2018 for 1080p, 1440p and 4K gaming

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080Ti

With graphics card prices soaring once again thanks to the lovely exploits of nefarious cryptocurrency miners, choosing what graphics card to buy has never been more difficult – which is why this here article is all about identifying the single best GPU you can get for playing games at 1080p, 1440p and 4K at a price that suits you. Read on for advice on what and how to pick your next graphics card for 2018. Read the rest of this entry »

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050Ti review: The best 1080p graphics card under £200

It’s been a pretty bleak couple of months for anyone hoping to buy a new graphics card, but there’s still a bit of good news to be found for those whose ambitions stop firmly at getting a great gaming experience at 1920×1080, as entry-level cards like the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050Ti on test here have been largely unaffected by recent price hikes.

Indeed, the GTX 1050Ti currently occupies the top spot in our Best graphics card 2018 article for 1080p gaming, and more importantly can still be found for as little as £150-odd in the UK and a fraction over $200 in the US. That’s almost half the cost of Nvidia’s next card up, the GTX 1060, which you can read more about in our Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 review. It won’t be much good for anything beyond 1080p, but if Full HD gaming is your bag, then the GTX 1050 Ti is an excellent choice.

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 review: The best 1440p graphics card (for now)

The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 is Nvidia’s new mid-range contender, chasing the coat tails of its more powerful big brother, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 and rubbing shoulders with the AMD Radeon RX 580 for 2560×1440 gaming goodness. Or at least the 6GB version of Nvidia’s card is, as you’ll also find lesser 3GB variants on sale as well.

3GB models have the same basic DNA as 6GB GTX 1060s, but they have slightly lower clock speeds and fewer cores, meaning performance won’t be as good as their 6GB counterparts. Indeed, we wouldn’t really recommend the 3GB GTX 1060, if only in the name of future-proofing yourself against the ever increasing memory requirements of the latest games. As you can see from our Best graphics cards 2018 article, you should really be looking at the 6GB version if you want something to rival the GTX 1070 at resolutions beyond 1080p, as there are plenty of cheaper cards, namely the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050Ti, that do 1080p just as well as the 3GB GTX 1060 without you having to spend almost £300 for the privilege. Fortunately, we have one such 6GB card on test to show us what it’s capable of. Say hello to the MSI GeForce GTX 1060 6GB Gaming X.

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 review: Still the best 1440p graphics card in 2018?

For many PC gamers, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 is the next logical step up from the excellent GTX 970. While not as powerful as the beefy Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080, it still offers significant gains over its lesser sibling, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060, providing a smoother, more flexible gaming experience at both 1080p and 1440p alike, and even a teeny bit of 4K. The problem is, graphics card prices have currently sky-rocketed beyond all reasonable consideration at the moment, putting potential GTX 1070 buyers in a bit of a tough spot.

In fact, we wouldn’t recommend buying any mid-to-high-end graphics card at the moment until this crypto-mining business settles down again. You can read more about other options in our Best graphics card 2018 article, but provided you can actually find one in stock and don’t mind paying through the roof for it, then read on. After all, when Nvidia claims it can outperform its £1,000 Titan X mega beast, that’s reason enough to sit up and take notice.

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070Ti review: Better than the GTX 1080?

The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070Ti is a bit of a funny old thing. I’ve spent countless hours trying, and failing, to determine where this 4K-bothering card sits in Nvidia’s overall strategy,  and while its position in the Nvidia hierarchy is obvious – between the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 and the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 – it seems to be more of a toned-down 1080 than a souped-up 1070. It’s got hundreds more cores than the GTX 1070 – 2432 of them, compared to just 1920, but falls short of the GTX 1080 by just 128 of them. Why, then, would you not just make that tiny extra leap to a full-fat GTX 1080?

To help answer that question, I’ve got Zotac’s take, the GeForce GTX 1070Ti AMP Extreme, while Katharine has MSI’s GTX 1070Ti Gaming 8G. Together, we should hopefully find out how Nvidia’s newest card stacks up against its siblings – and whether it’s got the chops to dethrone the GTX 1080 in our Best graphics cards 2018 article for 4K gaming.

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 review: The best 4K graphics card right now

The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 is no longer top dog in its GPU family – that honour now goes the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080Ti and, of course, the frankly ridiculous Titan Xp. However, with graphics card prices currently hitting all-time highs due to the rather ridiculous craze for cryptocurrency mining, the GTX 1080 is now our top choice for those after a 4K capable graphics card. If you don’t believe us, check out our Best graphics card 2018 article to see why we’ve picked this one and not its Ti counterpart.

To help us discover why it’s our 4K graphics card of choice, we’ve got the economically monikered MSI Gaming X 8GB Twin Frozr VI. To the benchmarks!

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080Ti review: A 4K monster that isn’t worth the extra cash

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080Ti

As muscular as the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 is, there have been some not-entirely-unwarranted grumbles about its underlying tech; specifically, that it’s basically a GeForce GTX 1070 with more of the GPU’s cores enabled. The GTX 1080Ti is much bigger break from the rest of Nvidia’s 10-series, and a much more overtly ‘high-end’ card. It uses the bigger, beefier GP-102 GPU, same as in the bonkers-expensive Titan X and Titan Xp, and wields 3584 processing cores to the GTX 1080’s 2560. Its 11GB of memory is the most you’ll find in a mainstream card, too.

Obviously, these upgrades will put a proportionally larger dent into your finances (which is part of the reason why it doesn’t currently occupy top spot in our Best graphics card 2018 list as our 4K card of choice). The MSI GeForce GTX 1080Ti Gaming X Trio I’ve been testing – with its factory overclocking and custom triple-fan cooler – is a staggering £900 right now, and generally the cheapest GTX 1080Ti I can find that’s actually in stock still asks for £850. With the GTX 1080 currently hovering around £650, this card needs to prove it’s not just a list of fancy-sounding specs.

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Nvidia’s GeForce Now PC beta is much better at cloud gaming than you think

GeForce Now

Cloud gaming has become a bit of a dirty word these days. There have been plenty of people who have tried their hand at it over the years, promising high-end, lag-free gaming without the need for all that bulky, costly hardware, but most (*cough*Gaikai*cough*OnLive*cough*) have ended up on that age-old trash heap of crushed dreams and broken promises, their meagre uptake prompting them to disappear back into the ether almost as quickly as they appeared.

This time, though, Nvidia might have finally cracked it, as the beta for their GeForce Now streaming service has finally arrived on PC in Europe and North America. It’s free, uses your very own game library and their respective cloud saves, and, whisper it, it’s actually pretty good. So rejoice all you laptop and creaking PC people whose rigs would probably faint at even the slightest suggestion of running something like Doom or Shadow of War at Ultra quality settings and 60fps. Your time in the gaming big leagues has arrived.

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Best of CES 2018: The top PC gizmos you’ll want to own this year

CES 2018

The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is over for another year. It was a slightly weird show this year, marred by an embarrassing power outage, one too many pointless robots (Cloi, I’m looking at you) and the creeping feeling that the world’s biggest tech show might just be becoming a bit irrelevant.

Fortunately, PC gamers still have plenty to look forward to in 2018, from giganto gaming screens and teeny tiny powerhouse NUCs to mouse mats that can charge your phone, metal-clad motherboards, and probably yet another hike in GPU prices when EVGA unleashes its crypto mining dream machine power supply that can run something silly like 14 Nvidia GTX 1070s all at the same time (thanks, guys). But all that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Read on for what I’m officially deeming the best of CES 2018, all without a single stroppy robot in sight.

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Cel-shaded PUBG, ’70s Truck Sim and zinester Assassin’s Creed with new Nvidia tool


Post-processing tools for games aren’t new – hello Reshade and SweetFX – but the world of dramatically altering a PC game’s appearance with what could loosely be described as real-time Instragram filters has always been a scrappy wild west. Nvidia have this week built themselves a governor’s mansion on this new frontier, introducing a feature called ‘Freestyle‘ to the GeForce Experience suite of game optimisation, streaming and screenshotting tools. It might lack the open source and community-driven scope of ReShade, but it’s easier and slicker to use on the games that support it – and the results can be dramatic. Gimmicky, sure, but making a game you’re otherwise tiring of into a neon fever-dream can be a real shot in the arm.

Presenting for your wide-eyed delectation and howling disapproval – Plunkbat: The Animated Series, Assassin’s Creed Oranges: Vice City and American Truck Simulator: Grindhouse Edition.
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CES 2018: AMD unveils new Ryzen CPUs and Nvidia takes gaming to the big screen

AMD CES 2018

The yearly tech fest that is the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) doesn’t officially start until tomorrow, but both AMD and Nvidia kicked things off early this weekend, detailing what’s in store for the rest of the year regarding their latest graphics cards, CPUs, and… “big format gaming displays”? Read on for a potted summary of all the big important bits you might have missed.

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Asus ROG Swift PG258Q review: 240Hz gaming gone mad

Asus PG258Q

There’s something faintly ridiculous about the Asus ROG Swift PG258Q. Maybe it’s the fact it has a glowing red Asus ROG light coming out of its elevated, three-pronged stand. Maybe it’s the colossal 240Hz refresh rate. Or maybe it’s the price, which most retailers currently have pegged somewhere around the £500 mark (or $513 if you’re in the US). That’s a fair bit of cash for a 25in 1920×1080 screen, especially when the Acer XF270HUA gives you a 27in, 144Hz 2560×1440 display for the same money. Nah, on second thought, it’s definitely the light.

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The last Week In Tech


Apparently, Intel will soon be selling CPUs with onboard AMD graphics. I have now, officially, seen everything. Yes, that includes a man eating his own head. I’m therefore leaving immediately for Nepal, where I intend to live as a goat. Which reminds me. It’s been nearly six years since my very first story and I’d like to think I’m unrivalled on RPS when it comes to the shameless recycling of other people’s gags. But, whatever. This is, ladies and germs, goodbye-ee. It’s also time to consider what’s become of the gaming PC over the last half-decade or so… Read the rest of this entry »

Asus ROG Swift PG248Q review: A 180Hz miracle monitor?

Asus PG248Q

Buying a monitor used to be a fairly simple affair. You’d pick one black rectangle from the dozens of other black rectangles, and if you really pushed the boat out you might get one with an adjustable stand, or, heaven forbid, a rotating screen.

These days, there’s a lot more going on. You can still opt for the faithful black rectangle, but if you’re the type of person who likes rainbow-coloured keyboards, mice and motherboards, you can now get a monitor to match. Take Asus’ ROG Swift PG248Q. This 24in display has a glowing red ring round the base of the stand, as if the resulting monitor has arrived from another dimension inside its slate-like base. Thankfully, it can be turned off via the surprisingly easy-to-use menu buttons on the rear of the screen, but at least the option’s there if you happen to like that sort of thing. Read the rest of this entry »

AMD Radeon RX 460 review: A bargain or just bad?

Multi-bazillion-transistor behemoths like Nvidia’s Titan or the AMD Radeon R9 Fury are all well and good, but it’s rare when you meet someone who actually bought one in the wild. ut the stats suggest hardly any of us actually buy them. Very few, if the latest Steam surveys are anything to do by, with not a single Titan showing up in the list. That said, even Nvidia’s mid-range GTX 1070 card is only used by 1.93% of Steam gamers these days, and that’s after a year on sale. Indeed, the second most popular GPU after Nvidia’s last-gen GTX 960 is its old budget board, the GTX 750Ti, proving that cheaper cards are still by and large the most popular choice among the majority of gamers.

AMD’s RX 460 is yet another attempt to capture that end of the market, but since we first looked at it a year ago, AMD’s gone and updated it with a slightly newer variant, the RX 560. You can still buy an RX 460 if you scout around – Scan still sell the 2GB version for around £100 – but it’s the RX 560 that should be your prime consideration. They’re both based on the same GPU, but the RX 560 has a slightly higher clock speed, giving it a small boost to performance. We haven’t looked at the RX 560 in detail just yet, but you can still get a pretty good idea about what to expect based on our following thoughts about the RX 460. Aspirational it ain’t, but could this entry-level board make for good-enough gaming graphics? There’s only one way to find out.

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