Posts Tagged ‘NVIDIA’

Best of CES 2018: The top PC gizmos you’ll want to own this year

CES 2018

The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is over for another year. It was a slightly weird show this year, marred by an embarrassing power outage, one too many pointless robots (Cloi, I’m looking at you) and the creeping feeling that the world’s biggest tech show might just be becoming a bit irrelevant.

Fortunately, PC gamers still have plenty to look forward to in 2018, from giganto gaming screens and teeny tiny powerhouse NUCs to mouse mats that can charge your phone, metal-clad motherboards, and probably yet another hike in GPU prices when EVGA unleashes its crypto mining dream machine power supply that can run something silly like 14 Nvidia GTX 1070s all at the same time (thanks, guys). But all that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Read on for what I’m officially deeming the best of CES 2018, all without a single stroppy robot in sight.

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CES 2018: AMD unveils new Ryzen CPUs and Nvidia takes gaming to the big screen

AMD CES 2018

The yearly tech fest that is the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) doesn’t officially start until tomorrow, but both AMD and Nvidia kicked things off early this weekend, detailing what’s in store for the rest of the year regarding their latest graphics cards, CPUs, and… “big format gaming displays”? Read on for a potted summary of all the big important bits you might have missed.

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Asus ROG Swift PG258Q review: 240Hz gaming gone mad

Asus PG258Q

There’s something faintly ridiculous about the Asus ROG Swift PG258Q. Maybe it’s the fact it has a glowing red Asus ROG light coming out of its elevated, three-pronged stand. Maybe it’s the colossal 240Hz refresh rate. Or maybe it’s the price, which most retailers currently have pegged somewhere around the £500 mark (or $513 if you’re in the US). That’s a fair bit of cash for a 25in 1920×1080 screen, especially when the Acer XF270HUA gives you a 27in, 144Hz 2560×1440 display for the same money. Nah, on second thought, it’s definitely the light.

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080Ti review: A 4K monster that isn’t worth the extra cash

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080Ti

As muscular as the GTX 1080 is, there have been some not-entirely-unwarranted grumbles about its underlying tech; specifically, that it’s basically a GTX 1070 with more of the GPU’s cores enabled. The GTX 1080Ti is much bigger break from the rest of Nvidia’s 10-series, and a much more overtly ‘high-end’ card. It uses the bigger, beefier GP-102 GPU, same as in the bonkers-expensive Titan X and Titan Xp, and wields 3584 processing cores to the GTX 1080’s 2560. Its 11GB of memory is the most you’ll find in a mainstream card, too.

Obviously, these upgrades will put a proportionally larger dent into your finances. The MSI GeForce GTX 1080Ti Gaming X Trio I’ve been testing – with its factory overclocking and custom triple-fan cooler – is £750, and generally the cheapest GTX 1080Ti I can find still asks for £698. With the GTX 1080 dropping as low as £500, this card needs to prove it’s not just a list of fancy-sounding specs.

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Best graphics cards 2017 for 1080p, 1440p and 4K gaming

Best graphics cards 2017

There are almost too many top graphics cards to choose from, which is why this here article is all about identifying the single best GPU you can get for playing games at 1080p, 1440p and 4K. Read on for advice on what to pick and how to pick your next graphics card. Read the rest of this entry »

The last Week In Tech

goodbye

Apparently, Intel will soon be selling CPUs with onboard AMD graphics. I have now, officially, seen everything. Yes, that includes a man eating his own head. I’m therefore leaving immediately for Nepal, where I intend to live as a goat. Which reminds me. It’s been nearly six years since my very first story and I’d like to think I’m unrivalled on RPS when it comes to the shameless recycling of other people’s gags. But, whatever. This is, ladies and germs, goodbye-ee. It’s also time to consider what’s become of the gaming PC over the last half-decade or so… Read the rest of this entry »

Asus ROG Swift PG248Q review: A 180Hz miracle monitor?

Asus PG248Q

Buying a monitor used to be a fairly simple affair. You’d pick one black rectangle from the dozens of other black rectangles, and if you really pushed the boat out you might get one with an adjustable stand, or, heaven forbid, a rotating screen.

These days, there’s a lot more going on. You can still opt for the faithful black rectangle, but if you’re the type of person who likes rainbow-coloured keyboards, mice and motherboards, you can now get a monitor to match. Take Asus’ ROG Swift PG248Q. This 24in display has a glowing red ring round the base of the stand, as if the resulting monitor has arrived from another dimension inside its slate-like base. Thankfully, it can be turned off via the surprisingly easy-to-use menu buttons on the rear of the screen, but at least the option’s there if you happen to like that sort of thing. Read the rest of this entry »

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070Ti review: Better than the GTX 1080?

Between finding out the GTX 1070 Ti was a thing and actually getting my hands on one, I spent a lot of time trying, and failing, to determine where this 4K-bothering card sat in Nvidia’s overall strategy. Its position in the Nvidia hierarchy is obvious – between the GTX 1070 and the GTX 1080 – but other than sharing 8GB of memory, it seems to be more of a toned-down 1080 than a souped-up 1070. After all, it has far more cores than the GTX 1070 – 2,432 of them compared to the 1070’s 1,920 – but just 128 fewer cores than the (ostensibly) beefier GTX 1080. Why, then, would you not just take the tiny step further to a GTX 1080?

It gets weirder, too: Nvidia seems to have a strange rule against its partners setting their GTX 1070 Tis up with factory overclocks, meaning that you can only buy at stock speeds (1607 MHz base, 1683 MHz boost). Workarounds have already been found for this (overclocking isn’t outlawed per se), but it seems an awful lot like Nvidia’s scared of the 1070 Ti sapping GTX 1080 sales. That, or they just wanted to give a central digit to AMD’s Radeon Vega RX 56 by outperforming it with a less ‘important’ card. I dunno, basically. But to help cure my ignorance, I’ve got Zotac’s take, the GeForce GTX 1070Ti AMP Extreme.

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AMD Radeon RX 460 review: A bargain or just bad?

Multi-bazillion-transistor behemoths like Nvidia’s Titan or the AMD Radeon R9 Fury are all well and good, but it’s rare when you meet someone who actually bought one in the wild. ut the stats suggest hardly any of us actually buy them. Very few, if the latest Steam surveys are anything to do by, with not a single Titan showing up in the list. That said, even Nvidia’s mid-range GTX 1070 card is only used by 1.93% of Steam gamers these days, and that’s after a year on sale. Indeed, the second most popular GPU after Nvidia’s last-gen GTX 960 is its old budget board, the GTX 750Ti, proving that cheaper cards are still by and large the most popular choice among the majority of gamers.

AMD’s RX 460 is yet another attempt to capture that end of the market, but since we first looked at it a year ago, AMD’s gone and updated it with a slightly newer variant, the RX 560. You can still buy an RX 460 if you scout around – Scan still sell the 2GB version for around £100 – but it’s the RX 560 that should be your prime consideration. They’re both based on the same GPU, but the RX 560 has a slightly higher clock speed, giving it a small boost to performance. We haven’t looked at the RX 560 in detail just yet, but you can still get a pretty good idea about what to expect based on our following thoughts about the RX 460. Aspirational it ain’t, but could this entry-level board make for good-enough gaming graphics? There’s only one way to find out.

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050Ti review: The best budget card under £200

When we last looked at AMD’s entry-level Radeon RX 460, I wasn’t too impressed, so can its nearly-but-not-actually competitor from Nvidia, the GeForce GTX 1050, do any better? Well, the answer to that is slightly muddled, as I’ve actually got the GeForce GTX 1050Ti – the 1050’s slicker, slightly more expensive sibling. So, can the Ti win where the 460 failed and deliver good-enough gaming at a budget price?

For starters, you’ll have to pay a lot more for a GTX 1050Ti than an RX 460, as the cheapest 1050Ti cards rock in at about £135 in Brexit tokens or about $160. This particular 1050Ti from MSI, meanwhile – the GeForce GTX 1050Ti Gaming X 4GB – really blows the budget at just under £160 in the UK and $180 in the US according to Newegg. This is getting on for an entry-level 3D board, even if you do get a little extra for your cash in the form of a factory overclock of around 8% over a standard 1050Ti and the promise of some additional overclocking headroom thanks to improved cooling and power supply.

Still, when your typical GTX 1050 costs around £120 / $130, the RX 460 (and its closely related successor, the RX 560) can be found cheaper still at around or just under £100 / $120, the GTX 1050Ti has a lot to prove to make it worth your time. Let’s see how it holds up, shall we? Read the rest of this entry »

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 review: A big leap, but not quite a 4K slayer

Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1080 is no longer top dog in its GPU family – that honour now goes the GTX 1080Ti and, of course, the frankly ridiculous Titan Xp. It has, however, come down quite dramatically in price since I first looked at it, arguably making it a better buy than ever before if you’re after a 4K-capable graphics card. The economically monikered MSI Gaming X 8GB Twin Frozr VI pictured above, for instance, cost a wallet-breaking £695 a year ago. Now you can pick up one like Gigabyte’s equally succinct GeForce GTX 1080 Turbo OC for as little as £489 from Scan. Or, if you head over to our Black Friday 2017 hub, you can find one for just £439 over on Ebuyer. The 1080Ti, on the other hand, has remained at a steady £700 since launch.

A no-brainer, right? Not quite, as there’s also the GTX 1070Ti to think about as well, which costs even less at around £420 and promises near 1080 performance. We’ll be taking a look at the 1070Ti shortly, so we’ll update this page with our findings soon to let you know how we got on. For now, though, I’ll turn my attention back to the regular GTX 1080.

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Nvidia Geforce GTX 1060 review: The New 1440p King?

Welcome to part two of my leisurely stroll through the new GPU landscape. Last time around, it was the mighty Nvidia Geforce GTX 1080, which suddenly looks a lot less mighty thanks to the arrival of the Titan X. Today, however, we’re looking Nvidia’s new mid-range contender, the GTX 1060. As before, I shall be spurning objectivity, benchmarks and frame-rate counters for a what-does-it-actually-feel-like approach.

I call it a mid-range card, but it seems Nvidia is currently engaged in an attempt to realign the entire graphics market. The Titan X is $1,200 and the GTX 1080 is $600 (well, $700 for those ghastly ‘Founder’s Edition’ cards), but the GTX 1060 we’re dealing with today costs just $260/£250 – that is, if you’re looking at the 6GB version, of course, as since we tested the GTX 1060, Nvidia has also released a less powerful 3GB model.

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 review: The 1440p Graphics Card Of Choice?

Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1070 neatly occupies what is normally my favoured slot in the overall hierarchy of any given GPU family, namely one rung down from the top graphics chip that’s actually bought in much more significant volumes. Except, Nvidia’s Pascal family isn’t entirely normal. We’ve already touched base with the GTX 1080 and the GTX 1060, and the GTX 1070 inevitably slots in between.

Things get even more complicated when you take the recently announced GTX 1070Ti into account, which nestles between the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080. We’ve yet to test the 1070Ti, so it’s difficult to say exactly how it compares to the rest of Nvidia’s Pascal pack, but with prices currently hovering around the £420/$449 mark (and regular 1070 prices not that much lower), it could end up being a much better buy than its non-Ti counterpart, especially if you’re after a card that’s capable of super smooth 1,440p gaming. We’ll be updating this article with more thoughts on how the 1070 compares to the 1070Ti in the very near future, but for now, let’s focus on the 1070 proper. After all, when Nvidia claims it can outperform its £1,000 Titan X mega beast, that’s reason enough to sit up and take notice.

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Nvidia’s GTX 1070Ti is arriving next week for £420 / $449

Nvidia GTX 1070Ti

We all knew it was coming, but Nvidia have finally confirmed the GTX 1070Ti. Sitting roughly between the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 in terms of specs and performance, the card will start shipping from November 2nd, with pre-orders open right now should you feel so inclined. It will set you back a fair chunk of change, costing upwards of £420 / $449 depending on which manufacturer design you go for, but with Nvidia’s next-gen Volta cards still seemingly a long way off and many regular GTX 1070 cards still priced in a similar kind of ball park, the GTX 1070Ti might be the card for you if you want something to rival AMD’s brand-new Vega cards. Read the rest of this entry »

Why Nvidia is overcharging us all off, just a bit

As I was saying, Intel’s CPU strategy has gone into meltdown. As a consequence, the cynicism of its approach in the face of weak competition – right up until AMD pulled its new Ryzen out of the proverbial – has been laid bare. But it’s not just Chipzilla that’s worthy of your scorn. For some time now, Nvidia has essentially been ripping us all off just a little bit. Here’s why. Read the rest of this entry »

The strange story of the PC’s not-death

Remember when the PC was dying-going-on-dead? Actually, it’s still dying with analysts prognosticating a further five per cent slippage in PC shipments this year. And yet the PC gaming hardware industry hit record sales in 2016, busting the $30 billion barrier in the process. Meanwhile, the market for innovative PC technology that’s at least ostensibly gaming-relevant has gone positively mental. Not that gaming PCs doing better than regular PCs is breaking news. But I wonder how much we’re all actually benefiting from those 18-core CPUs, VR headsets, 240Hz superwide monitors and 1TB SSDs. How much better, in other words, have your gaming PCs really got? Read the rest of this entry »

AMD’s 16-core CPU and other exciting stuff

Yes, yes, a 16-core CPU is likely-going-on-definitely irrelevant for PC gaming. But it’s an exciting notion in simple technological terms and it represents something that certainly is important for gaming, namely that the PC as a platform has woken up again. Along with that mega-CPU from AMD, we also have the imminent prospect of new graphics card families from both AMD and Nvidia, new CPUs from Intel in response to AMD Ryzen assault, an intriguing new APU, again from AMD, that could just make for some nice cheapo laptops with genuine gaming chops and, well, plenty more. And the annual Computex tech shindig hasn’t even kicked off yet…

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Nvidia release the most powerful GPU ever for the fourth time in under a year – but why?

It hungers for --new blood--

I appreciate that headline inclines a little towards melodrama, but this is really the situation: with AMD having spent the past year as something of a sleepy giant, Nvidia have been engaged in serial one-upmanship with themselves. Just under a year ago, their GTX 1080 GPU became handily the world’s most powerful consumer graphics card, followed by the even beefier 2016 Titan X shortly afterwards, which was then marginally pipped by the comparatively affordable GTX 1080 Ti last month. Now they’ve leapfrogged themselves once again with a new $1,200/£1,180 brute known as the GTX Titan Xp.

Specs’n’that below, but I think the bigger question here is ‘why are they doing this?’ Are they scared of AMD’s long-delayed riposte, or are they trying to trounce yesterday’s reveal of Microsoft’s new 4K Xbox?
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Nvidia’s new $700 1080 Ti in theory beats $1200 Titan X

With Nvidia‘s long dominance of the top end of the graphics card market potentially under threat from AMD’s upcoming RX Vega line, they’ve just offered a speculative riposte. The Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti is a buffed-up take on the year-old 1080, and though conventional wisdom (i.e. Nvidia naming traditions) would place it between that card and their $1200 Titan X, the claim is that their $700 new’un actually beats the X.

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FreeSync vs G-Sync revisited: FreeSync 2 is coming

This didn’t go too well for AMD’s FreeSync technology last time around. But lo, a shiny new version of FreeSync is inbound. Give it up for FreeSync 2: This Time It Actually Works. OK, that’s a little unfair. But hold onto your mechanical keyboards, folks, because FreeSync 2 is as much about streamlining the PC for HDR support (and indeed making AMD your weapon of choice for HDR gaming) as it is syncing your graphics card and your monitor nicely. Confused? You aren’t the only one… Read the rest of this entry »