Posts Tagged ‘Omikron: The Nomad Soul’

In Honor Of Bowie, The Nomad Soul Is Now Free

The god of pop passed away at the weekend, and it’s hit many of us harder than we would have expected. I’ve been listening to nothing but Bowie all week – Station To Station remains his best LP, since you ask – but another, stranger way to play tribute would be to play 1999’s Omikron: The Nomad Soul, the David Cage (I know, I know) game in which Bowie’s face and music play something of a starring role. Sweetly, its current publisher Square Enix is giving away free Steam keys for it (note – a separate link for US folk is below), in honor of the great man’s passing.
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Wuzza Wuzza: The Nomad Soul Re-Released on GoG

Hitting an all-time low polygoncount

Back before Quantic Dream’s David Cage was thoughtlessly proclaiming that only his barely-interactive exercises in ropey story-telling could save the world, he was busily being absolutely, 110% mad as a box of polecats and making gloriously cracked games about parallel worlds and David Bowie. There are a million and one things wrong with Omikron: The Nomad Soul, but its unflinching dedication to doing everything ever, regardless of all sense and logic, and somehow dragging the universe’s greatest pop star along for the ride, makes it something of a forever-milestone.

It’s back to bamboozle us anew, with a re-release on GoG.
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Eurogamer: Nomad Soul Retrospective

Wazza wazza wazza.

This weekend saw my retrospective piece about Omikron: The Nomad Soul arrive on Eurogamer. It was an interesting one – the process I mean – the game being from David Cage was obviously interesting. Trying to get it working on PC ended in sadfaced failure when I discovered ATI has stopped supporting DX6.1. Amazingly, having been commissioned to write the piece and with time running out, I found I owned it on Dreamcast. And that I still owned a Dreamcast. So while this is first and foremost a PC game, my playing of it last week was a brief affair with a (very) old lover. It starts like this:

“David Cage is a man of extraordinary vision. Whether you believe his games match his ambition is a very personal thing. I will argue with you that Fahrenheit is one of the most exciting games I’ve ever played, even though it’s broken in about 657 ways. Perhaps this is what’s most exciting about Quantic Dream’s output. However, I cannot find a similar love for Omikron: The Nomad Soul. And that’s not because I can’t run it on my PC.”

It carries on here.