Posts Tagged ‘Paradox’

Crusader Kings II And More In Humble Paradox Bundle

Fine PC publisher Paradox have joined up with those Humble Bundleers to offer a pay-what-you-want bundle of- hey, haven’t we done this before? So we have! I think this latest Humble Paradox Bundle is better than the first, though.

As ever, you get a selection of games from a list including Crusader Kings II, Magicka, Knights of Pen & Paper, and Europa Universalis IV depending on how much you cough up.

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Wot I Think: Magicka – Wizard Wars

After a year of Early Access, Magicka: Wizard Wars [official site] has finally graduated from Hogwarts. We’ve already shared our thoughts on various versions of the game but there’s still plenty to say about this maybe-a-MOBA and its complex combo-based elemental magic system. Here’s wot I think.

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Breaking History: A Crusader Kings II Journal – Part One

Let’s Play Crusader Kings II [official site]. Or rather, let’s watch Crusader Kings II play itself.

Partly inspired by the ongoing Civ V AI Battle Royale and partly by my own longstanding interest in the interplay of game mechanics without player intervention, I’ve decided to run a Crusader Kings II campaign, beginning at the earliest possible start date. I’ll be running the game in observer mode – that is to say, there will be no human player – and I’ve drawn up a set of rules to govern which parts of the world I’ll be observing most closely. Empires will rise, Kingdoms will fall. The mighty will end up rotting beneath carparks in Leicester.

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Collaborative Storytelling In Pillars Of Eternity

I take roleplaying seriously. That’s not to say I have a cupboard full of lucky dice or a handcrafted elven tunic – what I mean to say is that when I play an RPG, I try to make all of my decisions based on my character rather than the systems. I’ll pass up a huge pile of loot if I don’t think that taking it would be in-character. Roleplaying is a performance of sorts and Pillars of Eternity [official site] encourages my particular approach to the genre by combining a huge, tightly scripted plot with systems that go some way toward mimicking the best qualities of a human Dungeon Master.

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Mega-City One: Skylines Breaks Paradox Sale Records

Cities: Skylines [official site] has sold 250,000 copies in the 24 hours since launch, including preorders as day one sales. That’s more than any other Paradox game in the same period – Europa Universalis IV surpassed 300,000 sales around six months after release – and around a quarter of SimCity 2013’s first fortnight of sales.

Paradox are understandably pleased by the reception but they’re already looking to the future of the game. When I played it before release, Colossal Order CEO Mariina Hallikainen told me that the team already had free content lined up – features that weren’t quite ready for release, including tunnels. Support should continue for years though, as with Paradox’s grand strategy mainstays, and will come in the form of paid expansions and free patch updates.

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Wot I Think: Cities: Skylines

Cities: Skylines [official site] feels like the response to a question. That question is “what, exactly, do people want?” By contrast, 2013’s SimCity felt like the response to an order: “make them do this.” I don’t wish to get caught up in criticising the controversial EA city-builder, especially in light of the all-but-closure of its longstanding developer Maxis this week, but the ethos of these two games is so very different, even though they’re both in theory offering the same scenario: design a city from the ground up, keep it running, make it richer, make it grander.
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Subverting The Nazis: Alternative Hearts Of Iron Playstyles

Hearts of Iron [official site] is the one Paradox grand strategy series that I’ve been unable to befriend. Partly that’s because it’s a more guided experience, a game about a specific war rather than a historical sandbox and it’s partly because of the micromanagement involved in production and resource chains. Hearts of Iron IV might change that, with its cleverly streamlined factory operations and improved minor nations. More on that later this week.

First of all, I wanted to discuss the difficulty of playing the bad guys.

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