Posts Tagged ‘Peter Molyneux’

S.EXE: Groin Gravitators

COME HERE YOU BIG OWLHAIRED FOOL

My circumstances have changed yet again as I make my way around the world on a silly adventure with game developers. I find myself writing this week’s S.EXE in the muggy heart of the most boisterous American city, New York. It is currently pissing it down, and yet, as my friend Rob Dubbin remarks, it is hot like ‘a city on the surface of Venus’ and comes accompanied with a particular pungent smell.

My computer is hating Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines, so before I wrestle the next instalment of my diary into the RPS featuresmachine, I thought I’d utilise the things around me to bring you a change of scenery. These things are: my partner in crime and Kotaku comics Elizabeth Simins, beer, and a copy of Andrew Gray’s Groin Gravitators on Ouya or internet. Join me to play a game about Peter Molyneux’s groin!

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The Abysmal Godus Is No Longer Abysmal, APPARENTLY

look into the eyes of the chap on the left

Peter Molyneux and 22 Cans’ intended Populous heir Godus is the most miserable gaming experience I’ve had in many a year. It was so crushingly short on joy and cleverness, it seemed like a tech demo made without a design, it seemed to believe Farmville was gaming’s future, it was a betrayal of its own heritage, and it was an insult to all that had been promised. I struggled to find anything to convince me that it existed for any reason beyond making money. As an angry young man, I loathed games often. These days, I simply feel sadness and tiredness when I play a game I don’t enjoy. But Godus I loathed, and completely so. There should be no surprise, by now, at unmet promises, but the sheer scale of the oath-breaking here was breathtaking.

Now there is Godus 2.0. There are apologies. There are promises. There is talk of it being an almost ground-up rethink. It may very well be true, and certainly an attempt at salvage on this scale is to be admired. But we have been fooled so very many times before.
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Molyneux On Religion, Godus’ “Crazy” Single-Player

Peter Molyneux is up to his old tricks again, for better or worse. He’s gone gaga for Godus, and he wants the world to hear all about it. And who knows? Maybe this time – finally, after years of squandering his legendary status on unfulfilled promises and mediocre games – he’s onto something. Godus certainly sounds fascinating, with Molyneux describing it as a massively polytheistic EVE-Online-inspired social experiment that seems destined for player-driven chaos. But there are still far too many question marks, with the Curiosity-born god of gods and an offline single-player story being the biggest. So I took my promise-weary, cynical heart to Molyneux, and here’s how he replied.

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Molyneux Promises Ludicrously Big For Godus

True fact: pretty much all I do is interview Peter Molyneux. I try to do it as much as possible, because that’s the only time Jim lets me out of my box. Coincidentally, Molyneux knows a thing or two about boxes. His most recent one, Curiosity, erupted into a poof cloud of half-truths and forgotten promises, but now he’s sweeping them away to reveal a god game that might just be worth getting excited over. Admittedly, I say this with the caveat that Molyneux’s swung pretty wide of the mark in recent years, so take his promises to heart with a hefty swill of caution.

That said, he describes Godus as an insanely ambitious massively multiplayer EVE-Online-inspired god game social experiment – a “reinvention” of the genre if ever there was one. Head below for details on multiplayer, crazy god wars, why Curiosity was instrumental in reaching this point, the lessons Molyneux’s taking from EVE’s successes and failures, and tons more.

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Telling Tales: Molyneux Vs Vanaman


Game Informer have done a lovely thing and put Sean Vanaman (the creative lead and author of Telltale’s The Walking Dead games) in the same room as famed promiser-of-worlds, 22Cans’ Peter Molyneux. The consequence of this gentlemanly meet was an extended discussion of how Telltale have tried to up stakes on the adventure genre, writing for games in general, and some stuff about zombies: a topic on which all developers now have to pass a three-stage exam if they want to be allowed to continue developing videogames.

Watch it below.
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Molyneux On GODUS’ Surprise Publisher, Free-To-Play

Peter Molyneux likes to say things – perhaps a little too much, if a few forgotten promises pertaining to Curiosity and GODUS are any indication. Yesterday, he and I discussed Curiosity’s aftermath, what it means for GODUS, and why things like a PC version of the almighty floating cubolith never surfaced. Today, we continue that discussion with what exactly the sudden (and very unexpected) addition of a publisher to GODUS’ mobile arm means for everyone else, whether or not the game will employ free-to-play and/or microtransactions, and where all of this leaves 22Cans’ much-ballyhooed 22 experiments. It’s all after the break.    

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Molyneux On Curiosity, GODUS, And Forgotten Promises

Most cubes contain air, sugar, or tiny men named Rubik. Not Peter Molyneux’s, though. Instead, Molyneux himself emerged from the cuboid cocoon with promises of virtual immortality. Bryan Henderson from Edinburgh, Scotland will soon be godding at an eons-old level even though he’s just 18. For some, though, that prize rang hollow. “All that tapping,” many cried, “for the sole purpose of advertising 22Cans’ next game?” And what would’ve happened if GODUS‘ Kickstarter didn’t succeed in the first place? Would the prize have been something else entirely? Also, what does cell phone cube tapping have to do with a primarily PC god game at all, and why weren’t we able to at least participate in the tapping on PC? Molyneux initially promised it, after all. There are, in other words, some things to answer for. I got in touch with Molyneux to ask about all the rather questionable changes of plan, and also how all the “god of gods” stuff will affect GODUS for everyone else. Here’s the first part of our chat.

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