Posts Tagged ‘point and click’

Kelvin And The Infamous Machine Now Time-Travelling

Kelvin and the Infamous Machine [official site] looks like the sort of simple, light, and mildy quirky adventure fit for the summer gaming season. The game stars Kelvin, who’s a bit of a dunce. He serves as lab assistant to Dr. Edwin Lupin, who, while once probably a pretty nice guy, goes off the deep end when his time machine (which looks suspiciously like a shower) becomes the laughing stock of the scientific community. Kelvin becomes our unlikely hero when he’s forced to stop Lupin from travelling back in time to interfere with history’s great minds and their world-changing works.

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Hands On: Nelly Cootalot – The Fowl Fleet

RPS had barely gotten started when free point-and-click adventure Nelly Cootalot: Spoonbeaks Ahoy appeared in 2007. I adored it, and it appeared in our first ever advent calendar. So in 2013, when a Kickstarter was announced to fund a full-length sequel, Nelly Cootalot: The Fowl Fleet [official site], we demanded you fund it. You did, and with additional funding from snazzily named publishers Application Systems, the game is coming out on the 22nd. Yesterday I sat down in a Starbucks with creator Alasdair Beckett-King and had a play.

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The Last Door Season 2 Knocking On Early Access

In Season two of the The Last Door,
You’ll delve further into the Veil as Dr. Wakefield, from before.
You know, the psychiatrist of Season 1’s Jeremiah Devitt,
Who’s now out in search of his client who hath split.
Now caught up in a web of lies and deceit,
The doctor’s search widens, past England’s back streets.
Will he locate his patient, that he doth look for?
Or will he find that he, too, is lost in the search of the Last Door?

Okay, so I’m no poet, but it’s Halloween and that’s the best Edgar Allan Poe impression I’ve got. The Game Kitchen’s Poe/Lovecraftian-inspired 2D point and click horror game The Last Door [official site] has started its second season on Steam Early Access.

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Futuristic Adventure Read Only Memories Is Out Now

Wearing its cyberpunk, retro point-and-click adventure game influence on its neon-stained sleeve, Read Only Memories [official site] wants to send you into the future to become a struggling freelance journalist. Living as one in the present, I can assure you it’s not the most glamorous of lifestyles, but if you wish to time travel to Neo-San Franciso 2046AD to find this out for yourself you can – Read Only Memories is out now.

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The Preposterous Awesomeness Of Everything Is The Strangest Thing I’ve Seen In A Good Long While

When a game’s website leads with the words, “Oh god I hope I finish it before I die and/or go mad,” that’s a hint. The Preposterous Awesomeness Of Everything [official site] is a point-and-click adventure that returns to the early-90s LucasArts’ verb interface, but comparisons to anything else end there. Describing itself as a game about “progress, politics and propulsive nozzles” what it doesn’t immediately mention is the abundant nudity.

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Freeware Garden: Troll Song Verse One

Presenting Clod the Magnificent and his dancing trolls!

Kick. Grab. Smash. Bite. Roar. Those are the commands you’ll find in the Troll Song‘s SCUMM-like point-and-click interface and they are as apt as they are original, for this is an adventure starring four trolls and trolls simply do not act like your average genre protagonist. They do not push keys from keyholes onto newspapers. They smash doors; fiercely so, when their own species’ survival is at stake.

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Freeware Garden: Goat Herd and the Gods

Over their long, illustrious history point-and-click adventures have starred everything from wannabe pirates and odd teenagers to private investigators and obnoxious wizards, but never a goat herder. Happily, the aptly named Goat Herd and the Gods has just been released to right this heinous wrong by casting Atl the Aztec goat herder as its protagonist.

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