Posts Tagged ‘procedural generation’

Meet some strange characters in this procedural doodad

Some character creators these days allow you to create your exact likeness, but that’s not you. That’s how you see yourself, and that’s the surface – not who you are really. Only software can solve this. Thanks to highly advanced algorithms, you can discover your true self today using Benjamin Vedrenne’s Random Access Character tool. It procedurally generates strange characters made from different objects, in different colours and patterns, with different body shapes and different ways of walking. It asks you to enter your name at the start so it MUST be using some kind of science magic to capture your essence. There’s no other answer. It even outputs GIFs to share so here, come see the true spirit of the RPS gang. Read the rest of this entry »

No Man’s Sky devs launching fund for proc gen games

After trapping a galaxy inside a computer using maths, No Man’s Sky developers Hello Games are launching an initiative to fund and support other devs’ wild dreams of procedural worlds. With first-hand experience of risking running out of money while working on something they loved, they’d like to help other folks working with procedural generation and experimental games research. ‘Hello Labs’, as they call it, has already befriended one project and more may follow. For now, it’s all a bit mysterious. Read the rest of this entry »

Hey, These Procedural Trees Are Cool

Cool.

Friday afternoon is as good a time as any to ask: fancy seeing some cool trees?

I’ve got some cool procedurally-generated trees to show you.

You want to see some realistic 3D trees with dynamic fruit and falling-to-pieces? I can show you those.

Fancy some eerie neon pixeltrees which mmmay be sentient? I’ve got those too.

Lots of good trees today, my friend.

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Generation Next, Part 2: How To Generate A Religion

Mark Johnson is the developer of Ultima Ratio Regum [official site], an ANSI 4X roguelike in which the use of procedural generation extends beyond the creation of landscapes and dungeons to also dynamically create cultures, practices, social norms, rituals, beliefs, concepts, and myths. This is the second in a four part series examining what generating this kind of social detail can bring to games.

As I enter the city centre, I find myself confronted by the massive edifice of the Cathedral of Urrothek, the Bleak Mouth of the Desert. Its architecture is reminiscent of the religion’s chapels I have seen throughout the land, but on a far grander scale. A detailed garden of plants and stones is laid out in a geometric pattern beyond the many double-doors leading inside, through which pilgrims continually pass. Traversing these doors myself, I see reflecting pools glittering, incense holders etched with unique designs, a number of twisted and unsettling altars dedicated to Urrothek, priests in Urrothek’s religious garments walking about the building, tables and desks with scribes hard at study, and an iron gate, set back into a wall behind the altars, leading to the crypt below in which the most faithful of Urrothek’s holy knights rest.

And all of this, of course, was procedurally generated.

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Procedural Painting For Aliens In Joy Exhibition

We adored the sprawling artworld of Secret Habitat but didn’t you find something fishy about creator Strangethink Software’s claims that a computer created all of the galleries and artists and artworks? It’d need an expensive roboarm just to hold a brush, for starters. Now Strangethink’s latest, Joy Exhibition [official site], has revealed the truth: it’s all made by little people trapped somehow inside computers. Joy Exhibition is a first-person arter, giving us procedurally-generated paintguns splatting procedural paint to create paintings for a gallery visited by procedural silent glowbeings whose judging eyes I feel burning through my every worthless creation.

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Make Something That Makes Something At ProcJam

Last year’s ProcJam produced talks worth watching about the current state of procedural generation, while the game jam’s participants produced a number of fun games to play. Now the dates and speakers have been announced for ProcJam 2015, which will run November 7th to November 16th.

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Not Man’s Sky: A Quartet Of Procedural Planety Things

Look, I know what we said about No Man’s Sky and hype and all that, but this isn’t about that. Stop pointing hissing “Hypocriiite” at me and howling like Donald Sutherland at the end of Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Give over. I’m trying to show you nice things. Sheesh.

Today I bring you a quartet of things showing pleasing procedurally-generated spacebits, two directly inspired by No Man’s Sky and two I’m mentioning again because they’re nice and you might like them. We can’t explore No Man’s Sky yet, but we can coo over many other colourful planets.

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Ultima Ratio Regum’s Procedural People Are Handsome

Ultima Ratio Regum [official site] can be downloaded and played right now, but its appeal for me isn’t in the 4X roguelike’s unfinished alpha release. Much like its inspiration Dwarf Fortress, I enjoy URR because of its grand ambition, its commitment to procedural generation, and its carefully detailed development blog.

This week’s blogged about addition is particularly fine: procedural ANSI faces, as pictured above.

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Procedural Playthings: Dream Houses And Archipelagos

The day I don’t ooh and aah over procedurally-generated prettiness, you will know I’ve been replaced by a Snatcher, and you will know what to do. Today I’m being distracted from work by Oskar Stålberg’s Brick Block [official site], a browser-based procedural building generator.

Plop down blocks and they’ll merge to grow arches, windows, doors, balconies, and terraces decorated with cute details like plants, pots, and beehives. As a fan of dollhouses and miniature things, it is delightful. He’s made procedural archipelago and city generators to play with too.

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Procedural Generation Jam Is Worth Watching On Nov 8th

You could make this in a weekend, probably.

I wouldn’t normally post about something like this so early, but it’s cool. If you judge game jams on their potential to create interesting works, then the Procedural Generation Jam wins by hoping to ride the wave of interest in “making stuff that makes other stuff” towards a slew of fascinating games, tools and toys.

If you judge game jams on your ability to join in with minimum effort, then the Procedural Jam wins again by also livestreaming an afternoon of talks from experts, including Hazel McKendrick of No Man’s Sky, Mark Johnson of Ultima Ratio Regum and Fernando Ramallo of Panoramical.

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First Look: No Man’s Sky

Like Powers Of Ten with lasers.

No Man’s Sky‘s trailer, first broadcast on December 7th as part of the Spike VGX awards, opens by stating that the game’s “every atom” is procedural. What follows shows a character emerging from an ocean full of fish, climbing inside a spaceship and flying into space in a single contiguous motion, interspersed with quick shots of different planet surfaces, gigantic space stations, space combat, deformable terrain and more.

It’s fantastic, and exciting, and it leaves you with no sense of what the game is. The trailer shows you just enough to suggest it might contain everything you can imagine. It’s the space game you always wanted, as far as you know.

Luckily I had an advantage. When I first saw the trailer, it was a few days before the VGXs, and it was with the nervous, tired, excitable Hello Games development team. I spent two hours afterwards quizzing them about procedural generation, but also about what you actually do in No Man’s Sky.
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We Built This City On (er) Maths: PixelCity

IS IT CARPET CITY?
Always fan of a bit of maths on RPS. So when Simon Parkin made me watch a little procedural city demonstration that’s been doing the rounds, I thought I should share. If you want to know how it’s done, you should turn to the developer’s enormous diary of its development. If you want to know what it does, you should look at the video beneath the cut or consider downloading its very-much-pre-alpha screensave incarnation.
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