Posts Tagged ‘review’

Wot I Think: The Banner Saga 2

Despite its flaws, The Banner Saga [official site] is one of the most memorable indie releases of 2014, and now the second act is here to push the story to even more desperate frontiers. But does The Banner Saga 2 improve upon its predecessor’s lackluster strategy combat while still expanding on its promising story? Here’s wot I think. (Note: there are spoilers for the first Banner Saga’s ending).

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Wot I Think: Everybody’s Gone To The Rapture

Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture [official site] is The Chinese Room’s newly-on-PC game about exploring an English village in the hopes of finding out where everyone’s get to. I played it when it came out on PS4 a while back but I’ve just worked my way through the PC version and can now tell you Wot I Think:

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Wot I Think: Sorcery! Part 3 – The Seven Serpents

Earlier this week I allowed myself to catch up on the Sorcery! series, learning wot I think of the first two games. And since then I’ve been mainlining the third, released just last week. Inkle’s latest, Steve Jackson’s Sorcery! Part 3: The Seven Serpents [official site], makes some significant advances on what were already fantastic games – is it for the good? Here’s wot I think:

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Wot I Think: Fallout 4 – Wasteland Workshop

Wasteland Workshop is the second serving of Fallout 4 [official site] DLC that offers players new settlement items, crafting options, and the chance to capture wild creatures before pitting them against one another in purpose-built arenas. Beyond that, there’s not much else to it, no quests, no story, which is a fact reflected by its modest £3.99/$4.99 price tag. But is it worth your time? Here’s Wot I Think.

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Wot I Think: Sorcery! Parts 1 And 2

Three games into Inkle’s four-part video game conversion of Steve Jackson’s legendary choose-your-own-adventure (CYOA) Sorcery! books, I decided I should catch up on the first two, and review them. Before noticing Richard already did. Oops. So, anyway, I’m covering the first two today, having chosen my own adventure through both. Then I’ll come on to the latest entry released last week. Of Sorcery! Parts 1 and 2 [official site], here’s wot I think:

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Apollo 11 Sim Makes A Strong Case For Longform VR

One of the many lingering questions around the first wave of consumer virtual reality is whether we can realistically expect experiences which involve more than a handful minutes spent staring slack-jawed at some rendered paradise or briefly experimenting with a motion-controlled, cartoonish physics gimmick. I’m still combing through the 60-odd titles released on the HTC Vive’s not-a-launch day, and the bulk is solidly within the either the Brief Visual Experience or Didn’t We Basically Do This On Eyetoy In 2006 boxes. That’s OK: it’s early days and everyone’s still figuring this stuff out. But in terms of what I should actually use my Vive for day-to-day in the meantime, I’m coming up a bit short. Video is the main driver for now, but clearly I’d like to be gaming too.

Apollo 11 is more in the ‘experience’ box than the ‘game’ box, but what it does offer is something to spend an evening with, rather than just a slice of an evening. It’s a signpost to a VR future which simulates fantastic voyages, not simply hands-off lollygagging at something for a heartbeat. It’s also, like almost everything else I’ve tried, an all-too-able demonstration of current VR’s limitations, but I guess I’m starting to take that for granted now.

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The First Must-Have VR App: Virtual Desktop

VR, be it Vive, be it Oculus Rift or something else, is currently primarily discussed in terms of games, but given that what we’re fundamentally talking about is a new paradigm for computer displays, that’s hardly the be all and end all of it. There may well be various applications of VR in other fields – medical, scientific, tourism, military, porn, to name but a few – but general desktop computing is something that pretty much all of us have in common.

A question which has occurred to me since almost the earliest days of this stuff has been “can I use VR goggles instead of a monitor?” Less physical space but more virtual space, and the possibility of doing Minority Report-y things with the operating system. Virtual Desktop is the first attempt at meaningfully answering that question, and it’s about as essential a VR application as there is right now – but it also demonstrates why the technology just isn’t quite there yet.

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