Posts Tagged ‘RPG’

The RPG Scrollbars: Back To World of Warcraft: Legion

Like many, my relationship to World of Warcraft [official site] has shifted over the years, from second home (though never second job, unlike many) to an occasional jaunt to go catch up with my Undead Mage and see the latest fun stuff and twists and turns in Blizzard’s ongoing demonic soap opera. Sure, it’s a theme park, but so’s Disneyworld. I like making return trips to The Haunted Mansion too. And, with Legion, Blizzard’s done a much better job than its previous expansions of providing reasons to either stick around or come back. With Patch 7.2, Tomb of Sargeras, I decided to check back in on the battle against both The Burning Legion and the six-month content drought. From my perspective as a casual soloer, sure, but there’s quite a few of us.

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The RPG Scrollbars: Predicting Planescape

If you go down to planescape.com today, you’re sure of a big surprise. Unless you’re expecting a countdown, in which case, it’s that. What could it mean? Well, if you open the page source, you’ll see a secret message hidden in there – 0x50 0x53 0x54 0x45 0x45. Convert that from ASCII numbers to letters and you get PSTEE. The two most likely translations of that are either Planescape Torment: Enhanced Edition as Beamdog’s latest updated release, or someone is really looking forward to going down to Gregg’s for a pastie sometime on Tuesday. It’s not confirmed. It could be something else. Maybe there’s a ‘Planescape Kids’ TV series coming out. Nobody’s told me.

Though it would explain this changelog I found lying around the other week… Read the rest of this entry »

The RPG Scrollbars: Before Mass Effect Andromeda

Since the original trailers, some players have had questions about Mass Effect Andromeda [official site] and some of its details. In the name of answers, we present this snippet from the official prequel novel. Available March 28th from all good bookshelves.

From where Director Tann stood, the curves of the Nexus stretched out like the wings of an angel, embracing Andromeda and all its potential. He winced at the thought. Human thought. Sentimental. Shameful. A thought most unbecoming of a salarian, who should have seen nothing but steel and forceshields, aluminium and plastic.
        The buzzer rang. Ah. Distraction. How welcome.
        “Send him in.” Read the rest of this entry »

What can PC RPGs learn from Zelda: Breath of the Wild?

Regardless of platform, when you’ve got so many people rushing to call a game ‘possibly the best game ever’, it’s worth taking a look. This week then, what can RPGs learn from the 1994’s Rise of the Robots – the action brawler that combined ugly rendered graphics with ridiculous AI, and a musical score produced by the Queen’s own Brian May sitting uncomfortably on his keyboard for a while.

Hmm. I can’t think of anything. Fine. Let’s talk about the new Zelda instead. In particular, how its devotion to freedom goes well beyond simply giving you a map to play. Inevitably, spoilers follow, though it’s not really a plot game. Neverthless:

WARNING. I’M TALKING ABOUT THE FINAL LOCATION/VILLAIN

THIS IS A THING THAT WILL BE TALKED ABOUT IF YOU READ ON

COMPLAIN ABOUT SPOILERS AND I WILL LAUGH AT YOU

(A LINK TO THE PAST IS STILL THE BEST ONE)

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The RPG Scrollbars: Old Habitats Die Hard

There’s no better way to cause trouble than to talk about ‘firsts’. Say for instance that King’s Quest IV featured the first female adventure character, and you’re probably going to be drowned out by some pedant waving a copy of Infocom’s Plundered Hearts in your face. That pedant may even be me. Of course, that’s nothing compared to the folly of calling, say, Everquest the first MMO and leaving it without some very quick clarification. The extent of the first M in MMORPG, the importance of success over existence, the jump between mainframe and computer and all manner of other stuff makes it tricky to plant a flag everyone can actually agree deserves to be there.

But there aren’t many games with a better claim than Lucasarts’ Habitat, the latest classic game to get a fancy modern revival project. It definitely deserves it.

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The RPG Scrollbars: Notes On Writing A Universe

Hello, God talking. At least, within a certain small sphere. Like a few of Team RPS, I’ve been writing for games as well as writing about them recently, most prominently as the writer of Daedalic Studio West’s The Long Journey Home [official site] – a space exploration RPG with roguelike elements (but not the crap ones). You know. A SERPGWRENCO. We’re now at the stage where my job is basically done, the universe is designed, the dialogue is all written, and I’m asking tramps on the street if I can borrow their whisky just so I can breathe heavily into the bag. There’s not much more fun than working on a game inspired by some of your favourites, notably Star Control 2. At the same time, well… oh dear, here comes that pesky hyperventilation again…

But I’m not here to market, but to talk tools. I know I’m always interested in seeing behind the scenes, so this week, I thought I’d pull back the curtain a little to talk not so much about what I’ve been working on, but what I’ve been working in.

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How Darkest Dungeon found new horror through its turn-based combat

This is The Mechanic, where Alex Wiltshire invites developers to discuss the inner workings of their games. This time, Darkest Dungeon [official site].

Darkest Dungeon is an RPG in which four flawed heroes face damnably transcendent terrors as they explore the ancient narrow passages beneath a cursed mansion. Notch by notch, their grasp on sanity slips and their vitality trickles thinner as their torch dims and new horror befalls them.

This is a game in which pressure mounts, misfortune crushes, and mistakes are punished. You can’t expect your party to always survive, whether driven to death or madness, and its turn-based combat plays out with the constant understanding that every decision can turn on a knife-edge: a missed hit, an ill-considered target, the wrong ability. And a lot of that tension is founded on something that on its face sounds prosaic, even old-fashioned:

THE MECHANIC: 2D combat Read the rest of this entry »