Posts Tagged ‘television’

Time Commanders brings Total War back to TV tonight

Time Commanders, the BBC game show where contestants order around someone playing Total War, returns to British screens tonight. Imagine a blind Let’s Play of Rome: Total War directed by teams who didn’t know what Total War was but did between them share a Desmond in classics, a Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, experience leading their university rugger society, and four awful haircuts. After eleven years away, Time Commanders is back tonight with Gregg Wallace off Masterchef pitting board gamers against wrestlers in a recreation of 202 BC’s Battle of Zama. Have a butcher’s at this: Read the rest of this entry »

BBC Reveal Concept For Multiplayer Gaming TV Show

FUTURE?

The BBC have unveiled a concept for a live television game show based upon a multiplayer video game, smooshing together bits of The Crystal Maze with livestreaming and a top-down shooter. It sees contestants playing a game at home while a live-action presenter in the studio is zapped into the game world to be mean to them. This here ‘Multiplayer Broadcasting’ is not a show the BBC are actually making, to be clear, rather an idea Auntie’s R&D folks have been tinkering with. They’re interested in the future of audience interaction, see. Here, have a look:

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Sense8 Versus The Matrix

Sense8 starts badly. It’s a show about eight people with a telepathic link that allows them to share each other’s skills, language, and pansexual orgies. Those eight people each live in a different country, but their link means they are frequently thrust together – sometimes literally, re: orgies – across time and space to share the same moments.

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Judgement Call: Games And Reality TV

The Sims does the Great British Bake Off

There has never been an artificial intelligence as wise and handsome as baking’s Paul Hollywood. That’s just a fact. Here are a couple of other facts. There hasn’t been a strategy game as smart as Len Goodman or a piece of software as brilliant as Tim Gunn. You’ve never played anything that focuses on craft and skill as strongly as Masterchef does. SpaceX founder and high-falutin’ eau de toilette Elon Musk might believe that advanced artificial intelligence is an existential threat but until I can play a game that judges my work, I won’t be losing sleep about the rise of the sentient chatbots.

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Down The Tube: A Developer’s Guide To Television

You may have heard about last weekend’s extraordinarily disastrous attempt to film and broadcast a Pepsi-sponsored game jam, called GAME_JAM. At enormous expense (rumours fly of around $400,000), a group of in-indies – the likes of Zoe Quinn, Davey Wreden, and Robin Arnott – and YouTubers were supposed to be taking part in a reality-show-cum-game-jam for four days, to be professionally filmed, edited and broadcast on YouTube. The event didn’t make it through the first day before a number of the developers walked off set and refused to return, and everyone involved was upset and pissed off. It didn’t make it to day two. For a comprehensive account of what happened, you ought to read Jared Rosen’s article on Indie Statik, but the short version is: one of the people in charge was a sexist arsehole, the sponsorship was so ludicrous they weren’t allowed to drink anything other than Mountain Dew (not even water), and the atmosphere was miserable beyond anything conducive to making games. It was a massive, hugely expensive, disaster.

In response, we and asked Size Five GamesDan Marshall to use his experience working in television production to write a guide for developers when it comes to TV. What to look out for, the tricks of the trade, and why it’s probably best avoided altogether. We should stress, this is a general guide, and not directly related to those peculiar events in LA.

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Frosty The Snowman: Charlie Brooker, Games And TV

With a few notable exceptions, games haven’t broken into the world of television. There’s Videogaiden, of course, and I rewatch that at least once a year, but games are more likely to be mentioned in a news report about the commerce value of consoles or a violent occurrence than for their artistic or cultural merit. Arch-satirist and clever clogs Charlie Brooker has previously enjoyed some success with Gameswipe, but a trailer for his new programme, with writing from RPS chum Cara Ellison, Jon Blyth and Matt Lees, suggests that it might be a very important piece of television. A shame then that Brooker’s segment with journalist/presenter Jon Snow about the Playstation 4’s launch showed the latter displaying the unimaginative approach of an old man in an old medium.

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